March 20, 1950

LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

I am quite prepared to answer that question, because I paid what I thought was a deserved compliment to that colleague of mine. I am only going to say that I hope this paper, whether it be a weekly, a monthly or an annual, will suggest to the government that I be sent on a trip around the world at the expense of the people of Canada. The article to which I refer is headed "Grounds for Suspicion" and reads as follows: Current attempt of George Cruickshank and Calgary's A. L. Smith to "talk out" bills proposing incorporation of companies for the exporting of natural gas from Alberta to British Columbia is an example of a tarnished weapon being put to use in a worthy fight. Normally a filibuster is a pointless procedure, but the battle spearheaded by Messrs. Smith and Cruickshank-

Alberta Natural Gas Company

They should not have put my hon. friend's name ahead of mine.

-is of serious concern for British Columbia, and for the lower mainland in particular.

I am not going to read the whole of the article at this time. It is from the Abbotsford, Sumas and Matsqui News, a paper that has a larger circulation than any paper in my colleague's entire riding.

As I said, I am going to be extremely brief tonight. I am just going to quote one wire I received from my riding, although I could go on quoting them all night. This is from the minister in the province of British Columbia and reads as follows:

Retel sixteenth resolution recommending all Canadian pipe line route was given' unanimous support by our legislature at last night's sitting . . .

L. H. Eyres

Minister of Trade and Industry

This is the sort of thing that some of my colleagues cannot understand. Incidentally here is a letter from the provincial Liberal member for the city of Kamloops. I shall read just part of it:

We who are spearheading the pipe-line issue appreciate very much the work you have done, and we trust it will result in our mutual satisfaction.

I am watching the clock. I shall be brief. One of my colleagues rose in his place lately and talked for 52 minutes telling what a great man he was. I am going to tell what a great province British Columbia is in 15 minutes. One of the things I am most interested in, in this discussion, is what was mentioned by one of the previous speakers, namely, the building up of industries within our dominion, and more especially within the province of British Columbia. We have lost many of our overseas markets. We all know that. There may be different opinions as to the reasons for it, but we who come from farming districts know that we have lost many of those markets. We have to develop new markets overseas. We send great touring bodies over there. I do not know whether it would be just as cheap to pipe some of those delegations over there as it is to fly them over.

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LIB

James Sinclair (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. Sinclair:

Be careful to whom you are directing your remarks. They all look the same in Hansard.

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PC
LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

I hold in my hand a magazine which discusses where to build factories. I hope that every hon. member will get a copy of Canada's Weekly of February 17.

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LIB

James Sinclair (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. Sinclair:

Where is it published?

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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

If my hon. friend wants me to go on for forty minutes he can only

blame himself for it. Over the article entitled "Where to build your factory" there is a beautiful picture. That is the reason I should like you to see it. The subheading reads:

A number of localities which, it is thought, may recommend themselves to firms considering the establishment of branch factories in Canada, are being described in this series of articles.

Chilliwack, British Columbia

By a special correspondent

I shall read only a part of it, but I hope that you will all get a copy of it. Chilliwack happens to be the largest centre within the finest riding in the Dominion of Canada, namely, Fraser Valley.

This article differs from most of those which have preceded it in that it deals with one of Canada's smaller cities, situated in the locality which is mainly rural. Throughout Canada, there are many such. The sites they offer may not attract the industrialist with a multimillion corporation behind him. The factors governing his choice are manifold. He requires not only ready access to his raw materials, a ready market, transportation facilities and power, but has necessarily to consider a host of other problems, not the least of which is the labour situation. He will have to site his plant with due consideration for its suitability for the North American or, conceivably, a world market for his product.

I could read the whole article, but I do not intend to take up the time. I think I have made my point clear. I do not expect to speak on the pipe-line bills again. The people of my riding, and the people of the province of British Columbia, know exactly where I stand on the matter. They know that I believe sincerely in what I say on this question. As I said before, anybody in my province, or in any other province, who opposes me is sincere in his belief in the opposite direction, exactly as I am sincere in my belief in developing Canada first rather than the United States. I want to make a suggestion to the government. There is no rush in this matter. The sponsor of the bill that is before the house tonight said he had no idea where his company intended to build. He said he had no idea of the route over which his company intended to build a pipe line. I have no definite authority to speak on behalf of the company whose bill I had the privilege of sponsoring last year, the Westcoast Transmission Company, which has been mentioned tonight. It will be remembered that we gave them a charter without possibility of having the necessary details of an all-Canadian route written into it.

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LIB

James Sinclair (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. Sinclair:

Whose fault was that?

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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

That was the fault of all of us, including myself. I have every reason to believe that the company would be willing to have those details written in. I agree with speakers who have said previously tonight that there is no reason to rush this matter.

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195C


I have every reason to believe that the West-coast Transmission Company is willing to have its charter amended and an allCanadian route written into it. I would not say that unless I had some idea of what I was talking about. I ask the hon. member for Coast-Capilano (Mr. Sinclair) not to interrupt me. I did not interrupt him.


LIB

Joseph-Alfred Dion (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

Order.

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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

I object to being interrupted every minute when I am trying to speak seriously. I believe it is in the best interests of this country-

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LIB

Joseph-Alfred Dion (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

Order.

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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

I am trying to speak seriously. If you want me to talk for forty minutes I shall do so. I say to the hon. member for Coast-Capilano that he took sixty or seventy minutes to tell what a great man he was. I am making a serious suggestion. I would not make it unless I had some idea what I was talking about. I have every reason to believe that the company that got a charter last year, that we may have let slip through last year, without having an allCanadian route written into it, has made a formal application which is now under consideration by the Alberta petroleum board and the government of that province, and that this application is on a straight allCanadian route.

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LIB

William Alfred Robinson

Liberal

Mr. Robinson:

Have they withdrawn their United States application to the board of transport commissioners?

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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

Not so far as I know. I will answer that. I am trying to give the information, Mr. Speaker, but they will not let me do so.

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LIB
LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

I want to repeat what I said. I have every reason to believe that I think this company is agreeable to having an all-Canadian route written into its charter with the proviso that the same thing be done by other companies going to the west coast. This company already has a charter. Could there be anything fairer than that? So far as I know, they have not withdrawn their application.

When some of our west coast athletes were young they were taught to play ping pong and other pussyfoot games. I was brought up in the city of New Westminster. We were taught to play lacrosse. You had to be able to take it. When you play lacrosse you have to be able to box a bit. I was also taught that in boxing or in any other game the first rudiment of self-defence is to protect yourself

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Alberta Natural Gas Company in the clinches. I do not play these schoolboy games of ping pong. I played lacrosse, and in that game you have to protect yourself in the clinches. What did this company do? They made their application. They made the statement to their sponsor, and they made a statement in the railway committee room, that they were going to build an all-Canadian route. Then they discovered that their opposition was applying for the cheaper route down through the United States. What did they do? They protected themselves in the clinches. They also applied for a charter for a route down through the United States. That is only common sense and good business. I am not a businessman, and I am certainly not a lawyer, and above all I am not a mining engineer. That will sink in deep.

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?

An hon. Member:

Or a world traveller.

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LIB

March 20, 1950