February 16, 1950

PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, joining with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) in paying tribute to one of the members of this house who had endeared himself to all his fellow members, no matter in what part of the house they sat, I wish to emphasize particularly one aspect of his life which impressed itself not only upon those who knew him intimately but upon the whole country. If there was one word more than any other which will always be associated with the memory of the late T. L. Church- or Tommy Church, as he was known to everyone-that word is friendship. All through his life he followed the injunction of St. Luke: Make to yourself friends.

I doubt if any Canadian ever had more personal friends. It is certain that no Canadian ever knew as many people by their first names. He had an extraordinary memory, but that memory was not a mere device by which he sought recognition from others. It was a part of his interest in other people, in the human beings whom he knew. '

My own friendship for Tommy Church goes back a great many years. I knew him first when I was a boy in Toronto playing games. He was interested in everyone who was on the track team, who played football or hockey, or other games of the kind. He was interested in people.

I well recall the kindly and generous things he used to do for young people who came to the city of Toronto for the first time.

I know that many people who occupy positions of responsibility, in his own home community and in other parts of the country as well, owed to Tommy Church the opportunity to make a good start in life.

Mr. Church knew people of all ages and of every walk in life. It was all a part of that deep affection and concern for all he met. During the first world war, when he

was mayor of Toronto, 1 think he saw every train that left with men who were going overseas. I am sure he met every train coming back that carried servicemen- wounded, on leave, or about to be demobilized. He was in all reality what he was so often described as-the soldier's friend. That friendship was extended particularly to wives and children of the men who did not come back, and to those in difficult circumstances who found not so easy the adjustment to life when they returned.

As has been said by the Prime Minister, Mr. Church loved Toronto. In fact, throughout Canada his name was symbolic of Toronto. If he spoke in this chamber of the city council, of the harbour, of the general hospital, of the Canadian national exhibition, we all knew, and we were intended to know, that he was speaking about the Toronto city council, the Toronto harbour, the Toronto General hospital or the Toronto exhibition. He would have been surprised if anyone suggested that they were not the best in Canada. That did not mean that he was restricted in any way in his views as a Canadian, but his first loyalty was to the city in which he was born and brought up, and to which he had contributed so much.

But he had infinitely wider interests, and I think it is proper at this time to recall that along with Sir Adam Beck he did perhaps more than any other single man in Toronto to bring to reality the Ontario Hydro Electric Power Commission, which has been of such great advantage to the people of that province.

His friendships-and it is by those that he will be so well remembered here and elsewhere-were built on an unselfish foundation of abiding and real'interest in the welfare of all with whom he came in contact. As has been said already, he was a man of strong beliefs. At a time when it may be helpful that people of strong beliefs do adhere to their principles, he left no doubt as to where he stood on any subject in which he had some interest.

Mr. Church believed in his own city first. He believed in Canada. He believed in the great and continuing purpose of the British commonwealth and the empire. He believed that Canada's full growth as a nation, Canada's greatest opportunities in the years ahead as a sovereign state, lay within that partnership in whose association we had grown to nationhood and in which he saw the greatest future for the years ahead. He certainly did not fail to express that belief on any single occasion when the opportunity presented itself.

Mr. Church did an infinite number of kindly things which meant much to many people. I for one shall never forget the scene in St.

James cathedral in Toronto and at the cemetery where people stood with tears streaming down their faces as they remembered the man they loved, as they remembered perhaps in many cases the things that he had done in an unselfish way to help them along the road to life.

Tommy Church was one of those rare beings to whom these words of Alexander Pope apply in their full meaning:

Who broke no promise, serv'd no private end,

Who gain'd no title, and who lost no friend.

Topic:   THE LATE THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, not only on behalf of those associated with me, but perhaps as one who has had a fairly long membership in the house, I wish to express both regret at the passing of Mr. Church and sympathy for his sisters who have survived him. As the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) has said, when a young man arrived in the city of Toronto the one person who was almost sure to welcome him was Tommy Church-just as, on the arrival of a new member, Tommy was the one older parliamentarian who was sure to greet him. No matter what his views were, no matter what party he belonged to, no matter under what auspices he came, Mr. Church immediately took an interest in him as a younger member of the house.

I am glad that, although we differed so much in our views, I was able to form a friendship with him, a friendship that was possible because there were some things we had in common.

I think it was obvious to all of us at the last session of parliament that Mr. Church was failing fast. The manner in which he went through the session, the energy which he put into the debates of the house, the way in which he spoke of policies for which he will long toe remembered, was amazing.

The leader of the opposition has spoken of the interest of the late Mr. Church in the Ontario hydroelectric system, that great publicly-owned institution. We shall all remember, because of that interest of his in the public ownership of public utilities, how prominent a part he played last session in the discussion of certain matters which came before the house. I said to some of my friends one evening when Mr. Church was speaking that he was failing, and I thought that what we were witnessing was like the bright flicker of light before the candle goes out. Therefore I was not surprised when I heard with sorrow over the radio that Tommy Church had passed to the great beyond, upon which he had fixed a sure and certain hope.

Mr. Church loved this House of Commons; he loved this parliament. He was old-fashioned, as the Prime Minister (Mr. St.

The late T. L. Church Laurent) has said, in his adherence to the British empire rather than to the commonwealth. He preferred the old term. I am sure my hon. friends of the official opposition will not misunderstand me when I say that Tommy Church was a survivor of an old-fashioned conservatism which served its day and generation well. We shall miss him here because of the views that he invariably expressed, and the forthright manner in which he expressed them.

As has already been said, Mr. Church's life was one of kindnesses. He represented Broadview, a constituency in which there are a good many underprivileged Canadians, and Tommy Church was the friend of all, poor and rich alike. I have heard it said that when he went into his constituency he could meet almost everyone there and call them by their first names. I believe there is little exaggeration in that statement. He was a friendly soul, a man greatly beloved and respected by all who knew him. I recall the words of William Wordsworth:

That best portion of a good man's life,-

His little, nameless, unremembered acts

Of kindness and of love.

I think those words might well serve as an epitaph to Thomas Langton Church.

Topic:   THE LATE THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, we in this corner wish to associate ourselves with others in paying tribute to our late good friend and colleague, Tommy Church. Our very high respect for Mr. Church grew as a result of his warm friendly personality, his integrity and his deep devotion to his public duties. We respected and admired him also for the courage he displayed in remaining true to his strong and deep convictions to the very end. I am glad that I knew Mr. Church and gained inspiration from what I consider to have been a good life.

Mr. Church viewed with some sorrow and considerable alarm the steady and progressive disintegration of the British empire during the past few years. On numerous occasions in this house I heard him express that alarm. Indeed he was among the few to voice his fears about the forces that appeared to be wrecking the British empire. I think his courage and devotion reached their highest peaks on the occasions when, almost alone, he expressed his keen desire to see the empire preserved, with Canada playing a leading role in its regeneration.

In Mr. Church's death the house has lost a good and faithful member, the constituency of Broadview a devoted servant, the Conservative party one of its pillars, and his relatives and associates a warm and true friend.

The late T. L. Church We express our sympathy to his party and to those who are left to mourn the loss of a fine man.

Topic:   THE LATE THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH
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PC

Joseph Henry Harris

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. H. Harris (Banforlh):

Mr. Speaker, perhaps there are not many in this house who knew our late departed friend as well as I did. The Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) mentioned the year 1898. I am unable to go back that far, but I remember well that in 1905 I drove a pony and cart to take voters to vote for the late Mr. Church. I remember so well coming into this house for the first time as the youngest member of that day. Mr. Church was then a member and at that time he represented a western portion of the city of Toronto and I the eastern. With the change in population and other changes brought about by time, it was necessary for him to find another seat. My riding was split into two and he took over a large number of my people. I took the remainder.

I can see the late Mr. Church, during the last election campaign, at the corner of Gerrard and Broadview in Toronto. I can see him entering stores and greeting storekeeper after storekeeper, all of whom knew him well, and many of whom supported him because they loved him. They not only loved him; they also loved the principles for which he stood.

I know these people. I learned to know them when I was quite young, and I know what they thought of our departed friend. I know that they realized, as the Prime Minister said a moment ago, that the late Mr. Church was a champion of all the merits of a worthy daughter of the empire. We appreciate the sentiment of the Prime Minister, but I also know that the valiant sons and daughters who came back from two world wars after serving Canada loved the late Mr. Church more than any other person from that great metropolis of close to a million people. They appreciated the fact that he saw every troop train leave, and met every train that brought them back. These sons and daughters of Canada knew where they stood, and they knew they would have a supporter in this assembly to look after their interests.

I feel it a high privilege to have this opportunity of paying a tribute to the late member for Broadview. It was also my good fortune to know his sisters, one of whom has also passed on. I knew the late member for Broadview for forty-five years. Far too many men of that calibre have been lost to Canada. If any young men or young women within range of my voice this afternoon are still considering their future course, particularly in reference to their leaning toward the empire or otherwise, let them take a leaf out

of the book of Thomas Langton Church, who, whatever you may say, in my opinion was one of Canada's greatest statesmen. He accomplished much, not for himself but for Toronto, for Ontario and for Canada, and much for the empire, which is playing such a vital part in the events of this day and generation.

Topic:   THE LATE THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Jean Frangois Poulioi (Temiscouala):

Mr. Speaker, may I join the countless friends of the late Mr. Church in conveying to his family, to his native city of Toronto and to his party my deepest sympathy in their great loss. Seldom have we heard such fine tributes as those which have been paid this afternoon to the memory of a great Canadian and a great man who is no longer among us.

I knew Mr. Church for many years; he was exceedingly kind to me. I remember that the first occasion I had to thank him was when I was fighting some private legislation which concerned my constituency. I did not ask for his support, but I received it in most generous measure, and from that time on we were friends. We also had mutual friends in the city of Toronto, and he did me the signal honour of introducing me to the primate of his church.

Reference has been made to his natural congeniality and his ability to make friends, but nothing has been said of the high regard in which he was held by the high clergy of his church. During the last Christmas season he had an invitation from the primate of that church to spend some time with him in Halifax. Unfortunately the invitation could not be accepted, but when I saw the report of the funeral I was not at all surprised to learn that for many hours before the service he lay in state in his church, and that the service was conducted by the primate, the Most Reverend Archbishop Kingston, assisted by the Dean of Toronto.

That did not mean that Mr. Church was at all narrow-minded. He represented a constituency named Broadview, and he deserved to represent it, because he was so broadminded. For the dignitaries of other churches, in particular the Roman Catholic church, he had the same respect he held for his own clergy. Often he told me that he had attended celebrations to honour Monsignor Casey in Toronto, and he was on the most intimate terms with His Eminence Cardinal McGuigan, the present Roman Catholic archbishop of Toronto.

I never heard Tommy Church say anything nasty about anyone in the House of Commons; that is why he enjoyed the respect of all. He held deep convictions; and in that

regard I should like to read a very fine sentence which was uttered by one of our mutual friends, Bishop Renison, speaking of him in St. James cathedral last Friday:

He was one who was touched in youth by the glorious spiritual conception of the British empire.

Personally I did not always agree with him on certain matters, but we could remain friends without sharing the same views. That is the great privilege of members of the House of Commons. We come from all corners of this country; we do not always hold the same views, but we remain friends because we respect each other and understand the point of view of the other man, though that point of view may be entirely different from our own.

The late Mr. Church did a great deal for the city of Toronto. During his lifetime I said of him, without desiring to give offence to anyone else, that no one had done as much as he had done for his native city. In regard to the transportation system, for example, he saved the city twenty-four or twenty-five million dollars; and he was known to be honest. If he had not been, we would not have heard the eulogies that have been uttered today.

Sir, the memory of Tommy Church will live for ever. He did a great deal for our soldiers, as has been said. He did a great deal also for the underdog, for those who seemed to have no friends, who were turned away by all. They found a friend in Tommy Church because they were weak, because they were poor, because they were ill. He wanted them to be well and happy.

I always admired Mr. Church's courage and his deep conviction every time he spoke in the house. During the last session he was more active than any other private member. It seemed to be his swan song. He wanted to accomplish as much for his country, in this House of Commons, as he did during the time he occupied the chair of the first magistrate of the queen city of Toronto.

May I conclude with a personal recollection? A few days before his death eight or nine years ago, Mr. Lapointe was piloting his estimates through the house. He did not seem to be very well, and he was having trouble with some members of the opposition who were repeatedly harping on the same matter. It was very hot, and Mr. Lapointe was tired and ill. Tommy Church was instrumental in putting an end to the questioning, so Mr. Lapointe sent him a note of thanks. It read, "My dear Tommy: You are the prince of them all." I have no doubt that those who have charge of Tommy Church's correspondence will find that note. He kept it and showed it to me and to some of his friends,

The Ministry

because he was quite proud of it. I shall close by paraphrasing that quotation; Tommy Church was the prince of them all.

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THE MINISTRY

ANNOUNCEMENTS OF RESIGNATIONS AND APPOINTMENTS

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I should like to mention the changes that have taken place in the ministry since the last session.

Hon. Colin Gibson resigned as Minister of Mines and Resources on January 18. Hon. J. J. McCann was appointed Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys, retaining his present portfolio of national revenue, also on January 18.

Hon. Robert H. Winters resigned as Minister of Reconstruction and Supply and was appointed Minister of Resources and Development on January 18.

Hon. Walter E. Harris was, on the same day, appointed Minister of Citizenship and Immigration. Because I was standing I did not applaud that announcement, but I share with other hon. members their pleasure at seeing the member for Grey-Bruce assume additional responsibilities in the conduct of the affairs of the country.

I should like to table the relevant orders in council dealing with those appointments, and to add that Mr. Harris, of course, prior to taking the oath of office as a minister of the crown, resigned as parliamentary assistant to the Prime Minister and president of the privy council.

Topic:   THE MINISTRY
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENTS OF RESIGNATIONS AND APPOINTMENTS
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PARLIAMENTARY ASSISTANTS

ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESIGNATION AND APPOINTMENTS

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. Si. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I should like to announce that Mir. Ralph Maybank resigned as parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Mines and Resources on January 18, and on the same day was appointed parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys.

Mr. George Prudham was appointed parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Resources and Development on February 1, 1950.

I wish to table the orders in council relating to those appointments.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY ASSISTANTS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESIGNATION AND APPOINTMENTS
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TRANSFER OF DUTIES

GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES COMPENSATION ACT

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I wish to table orders in council dealing with the provisions of the Public Service Rearrangement and Transfer of

8 HOUSE OF

Constitutional Conference Duties Act. The functions of the Minister of Transport under the Government Employees Compensation Act, 1947, were transferred to the Minister of Labour. The control and supervision of the government employees compensation branch of the Department of Transport were transferred to the Department of Labour. It was felt that the functions to be performed in connection with the service were somewhat similar to the functions that were being performed by the Department of Labour in connection with unemployment insurance and like services. It would therefore be more convenient to have those services administered by that department.

The duties and functions of the Minister of Finance under the act respecting the national battlefields at Quebec and amendments thereto were transferred to the Minister of Resources and Development. They are functions similar to those the department has to exercise in connection with national parks in other parts of the country, and it was felt it would be conducive to the expeditious handling of business, as well as more economical administration, to have the minister charged with the administration of other national parks entrusted with the responsibility for the operation of the battlefields commission at Quebec.

I table the orders in council relating to these transfers.

Topic:   TRANSFER OF DUTIES
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES COMPENSATION ACT
Sub-subtopic:   QUEBEC BATTLEFIELDS COMMISSION
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REPORTS AND PAPERS

CONSTITUTIONAL CONFERENCE

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I should like to table two copies in English and two copies in French of the proceedings of the constitutional conference between the federal and provincial governments, January 10-12, 1950.

There are also copies in English and in French of the further correspondence between the Prime Minister and the premiers of the provinces respecting the constitutional conference, January 10, 1950, and the proposed general conference to be held in the autumn of this year. The previous letters dealing with these matters were printed as appendices to Hansard. If it be the desire of hon. members to have these letters appear as an appendix to today's Hansard, I might ask Your Honour to make that order.

There are also copies in English and in French of the correspondence which took place last summer with Premier Campbell of Manitoba and Premier Douglas of Saskatchewan on the subject of dominion-provincial relations. Since there have been so many of these letters published, I thought it

(Mr. St. Laurent.]

might be the desire of hon. members to have all the correspondence that has taken place in that connection made available. Perhaps hon. members would wish also to have these letters printed as an appendix to Hansard of today.

Topic:   REPORTS AND PAPERS
Subtopic:   CONSTITUTIONAL CONFERENCE
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION- PROVINCIAL RELATIONS
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is it the pleasure of the house that these documents should be printed as an appendix to today's Hansard?

Topic:   REPORTS AND PAPERS
Subtopic:   CONSTITUTIONAL CONFERENCE
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION- PROVINCIAL RELATIONS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

(For text of correspondence, see Appendix, pages 13 to 21.)

Topic:   REPORTS AND PAPERS
Subtopic:   CONSTITUTIONAL CONFERENCE
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION- PROVINCIAL RELATIONS
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ORDERS IN COUNCIL

February 16, 1950