February 16, 1950

OFFICIAL REPORT

SECOND SESSION-TWENTY-FIRST PARLIAMENT 14 GEORGE VI, 1950 VOLUME I, 1950 COMPRISING THE PERIOD FROM THE SIXTEENTH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1950, TO THE TWENTY-SECOND DAY OF MARCH, 1950, INCLUSIVE BEING VOLUME CCLXXII FOR THE PERIOD 1875-1950 INDEX ISSUED IN A SEPARATE VOLUME OTTAWA EDMOND CLOUTIER, C.M.G., B.A., L.PH., PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY


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ouse of Commons, ©etiates



Speaker: The Honourable W. Ross Macdonald Thursday, February 16, 1950


SECOND SESSION-TWENTY-FIRST PARLIAMENT-OPENING


The parliament which had been prorogued on the tenth day of December, 1949, met this day at Ottawa for the dispatch of business. Mr. Speaker read a communication from the Governor General's Secretary, announcing that His Excellency the Governor General would proceed to the Senate chamber at three o'clock p.m. on this day, for the purpose of formally opening the session of the dominion parliament. A message was delivered by Major C. R. Lamoureux, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, as follows: Mr. Speaker, His Excellency the Governor General desires the immediate attendance of this honourable house in the chamber of the honourable the Senate. Accordingly the house went up to the Senate chamber. And the house being returned to the Commons chamber:


VACANCY

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that during the recess I received communications from several members informing me that the following vacancy had occurred in the representation, viz.:

Of the Hon. Colin William George Gibson, member for the electoral district of Hamilton West, consequent upon his acceptance of an office of emolument under the crown.

I accordingly issued my warrant to the chief electoral officer to make out a new writ of election for the said electoral district.

Topic:   VACANCY
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OATHS OF OFFICE

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, in accordance with the traditional usage, I beg leave to introduce Bill No. 1, respecting the administration of oaths of office.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   OATHS OF OFFICE
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GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Governor General this day in the Senate chamber, His Excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses of parliament. To prevent mistakes, I have obtained a copy, which is as follows: Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

The conference with representatives of the provincial governments forecast in my speech closing your last session was held in January. This conference marked a promising beginning in working out a satisfactory procedure for making within Canada whatever amendments to the constitution may from time to time be required. Agreement was reached on certain general principles and a continuing committee was established to further the work of the conference.

The governments of all the provinces have also been invited to participate in a general conference between the federal and provincial governments early next autumn to consider other matters of mutual concern. The several provincial authorities have been asked to make suggestions as to the principal topics they will wish to have discussed at this conference.

In the meantime negotiations are proceeding with the provincial governments for the implementation of the legislation adopted at your last session respecting housing, a transcontinental highway and forest conservation.

The national health program has been extended to the province of Newfoundland and further satisfactory progress has been made, in co-operation with the provinces generally, in the development of more adequate health facilities and services.

In the international sphere, our country continues to give full support to the charter of the United Nations. A Canadian delegation is now attending a session of the economic and social council to which Canada was elected at the last session of the general assembly.

The recent conference in Ceylon of the foreign ministers of the nations of the commonwealth demonstrated that there is a continuing and substantial community of outlook among the nations of the commonwealth both in the east and the west in their approach to current problems of foreign affairs.

The measures for the preservation of peace and the restoration and maintenance of prosperity contemplated by the North Atlantic treaty are being devised and applied as expeditiously as circumstances permit. The wholehearted co-operation of

Governor General's Speech all the signatories to the treaty is encouraging evidence of their determination to deter aggression by a combination of actual and potential strength calculated to remove the possibility of successful aggression.

The cold war nevertheless still continues and imposes on all the free nations heavy burdens for the provision of defence forces and modern armaments. Preparedness to meet any sudden onslaught is essential and the means must be provided. But the free nations also face a test of endurance, and our staying power could be endangered by attempting to achieve complete preparedness at the expense of our adaptability to new developments in weapons and techniques of warfare or the efficiency of our social and industrial systems.

In the development of Canada's defence forces, constant attention is being given to the best use of our resources, to the encouragement of joint research and experimental development and to the co-ordination of Canadian efforts with those of the other signatories of the North Atlantic treaty.

The measure to consolidate existing legislation respecting our defence forces and to provide for a purely Canadian disciplinary code to be made applicable to all the forces will be re-introduced.

Employment and prosperity remain at a high level in Canada. The prospects are good for continued private investment in construction and capital development throughout the present year. The demand for consumer goods of all kinds continues to be strong. However, seasonal and local factors have given rise to a significant amount of temporary regional unemployment during the past few months and the security provisions established under unemployment insurance legislation have been called upon to meet the first important test since they were brought into effect.

Although a high proportion of persons temporarily unemployed are actually in receipt of unemployment insurance benefits, you will be asked to give consideration to a bill to widen the scope and extend the benefits of unemployment insurance.

Circumstances outside Canada have been responsible for some downward adjustment in the price of farm products. Measures have already been taken to reduce the impact of these adjustments. In order to provide authority for continuing price support to that end for the primary products of our farms and fisheries, you will be asked to amend the Agricultural Products Act, the Agricultural Prices Support Act and the Fisheries Prices Support Act.

Within the past year, the international wheat agreement has been brought into operation. In view of Canada's participation in that agreement and the recent decision to market coarse grains through the Canadian wheat board, you will also be asked to consider a measure to renew the existing powers of the board.

During the past year Canadian exports were maintained at close to record levels, but continued difficulties arising out of the world-wide dollar shortage have resulted recently in reduced purchases of a number of our export products.

Canadian representatives continue to participate actively in co-ordinated international efforts to bring about improvement in the underlying conditions of world trade. The government is also pursuing policies designed to develop new markets for our products and to assist overseas customers to increase Canadian earnings. My ministers will continue their efforts to secure reductions in trade barriers. To this end preparations are actively under way for further multilateral trade negotiations later in the present year.

While prevailing exchange difficulties will require continued readjustments, we have reason to expect that our export trade as a whole will remain at a high level during the present year.

You will be asked to give consideration to the legislation required to implement the policy concerning the control and the orderly decontrol of rents announced by the government during your last session.

A measure will be introduced to amend the Canada Shipping Act to incorporate changes suggested by the Safety of Life at Sea Convention of 1948 and to define duties of Canadian consuls and conditions of registration in Canada of Canadian ships.

You will be asked to consider a bill for the revision of the Indian Act.

A bill will be submitted to substitute a uniform and systematic procedure for existing legislation concerning publication and tabling in parliament of regulations and orders made by the governor in council or ministers or other agents of the crown in the exercise of powers conferred by statute.

Bills will be introduced to implement the policies announced at the last session respecting prize money; the inclusion of veterans of British and allied forces within the scope of the War Veterans Allowance Act; and grants to municipalities in which there is an exceptional concentration of federal property.

Other measures requiring your consideration will include bills to amend the Militia Pension Act; the Criminal Code; the Government Annuities Act; the Post Office Act; the Consolidated Revenue and Audit Act; the Currency Act; the Trust Companies Act; the Canadian and British Insurance Companies Act, 1932; the Foreign Insurance Companies Act, 1932: the Customs Act; the Maritime Marshland Rehabilitation Act; and the Northwest Territories Power Commission Act.

Members of the House of Commons:

You will be asked to make provision for all essential services for the next fiscal year.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

I pray that Divine Providence may bless your deliberations.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

MOTION FOR PRECEDENCE OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to move, seconded by the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner):

That the speech of His Excellency the Governor General to both houses of parliament be taken into consideration on Friday next, and that unless and until otherwise ordered by this house, this order have precedence over all other business except introduction of bills and government notices of motions, on every day of next week, and thereafter on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays until disposed of.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR PRECEDENCE OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, before this motion is put I should like to say that this is a new procedure which we accepted during the war because of the desire of hon. members of all parties to facilitate the business of the house. Again last session it was accepted because we knew the government had a certain program of legislation, and we were anxious to facilitate its consideration.

I believe, however, that this is a precedent which should not be accepted without some protest on behalf of the private members of the house. What it actually does is to interrupt debate on the address and, in a way, to take interest from it and prolong it. I believe that in the interests of debate it would be better to proceed with the debate on the address, and to conclude it, as the normal procedure of the house requires.

I would point out, too, that if interruptions prolong the debate to any extent, the house loses at least one of the private members' days. The rules of the house indicate that the first four Thursdays shall be allotted to private members. Today is the first of those four, and there are three others. If the debate on the address goes beyond the next three Thursdays, then private members will .lose one of the opportunities they have to discuss private members' motions.

I had thought that at this session, which is not one crowded with legislation, in all probability the government would revert to the normal procedure of the house. I wish, therefore, on behalf not only of my own associates but also of other private members who, I know, share this view, to make protest, and to say that I hope once again the house will not accept this as a precedent to be followed in future.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR PRECEDENCE OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS
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Motion agreed to.


THE LATE THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure all hon.

members of the house were much grieved to hear last week of the death of one of the oldest and most respected, and, I would add, best loved members of the House of Commons, Mr. Thomas Langton Church, member of parliament for the constituency of Broadview, Toronto, since 1935.

Mr. Church's death brought to a close a remarkable career of public service to the city of Toronto and to the nation. I doubt if there are many who enjoyed the confidence of their electors over such a long period of time, because he occupied public office, practically without interruption, from 1898 to the date of his death. He was first elected to public office in 1898 as a member of the high school board in the city of Toronto. In 1905 he became an alderman, and he remained a member of the city council until the end of 1921. In 1910 the electors promoted him to the board of control, and from 1915 to 1921 inclusive he was mayor of that city. That, I understand, is a record which has not been equalled by any other mayor in the history of Toronto.

The late T. L. Church

Mr. Church was also for seventeen years a trustee of the Toronto General hospital, and for fifteen years a director of that great institution, the Canadian national exhibition.

In 1909 and 1910 he brought forward a proposal for the development of a harbour at Toronto worthy of the growing importance of that city, and became a member of the reorganized board of harbour commissioners, and afterwards its chairman. As mayor he was chairman of the Toronto board of police commissioners, and was also for seven years a member of the Toronto Hydro Electric Commission.

Mr. Church was president of the Union of Canadian Municipalities for two terms, and at different times he was president of the Ontario Municipal Electrical Association, the Hydro Radial Union, and the Ontario Municipal Association. He had been called to the bar of Ontario in 1897, and for many years acted as general counsel for the Toronto Electric Commission.

He was first elected to parliament in 1921, and, though he suffered a defeat in the general election of 1930, returned to the House in a by-election in 1934. I am sure all hon. members are agreed that at Ottawa he displayed the splendid qualities which endeared him to the electors of Toronto during all those years. Perhaps his two most outstanding qualities were his capacity for making and keeping friends, and his devotion to the welfare of his native city.

He was always kind, generous, honest, and uncompromising. He held views which perhaps were not widely supported throughout the country, but he was a man of pi'inciples to which he adhered constantly and unswervingly. There never could be any doubt as to where he stood. He knew it himself, and he made it known to his constituents, to the house and to the nation. Perhaps no man in public life ever fought more fiercely for his convictions, but I doubt if any was ever more considerate of his opponents. He always treated his bitterest political antagonists as gentlemen, and I do not believe there was ever a grudge in his whole make-up.

There was a striking contrast between, on the one hand, his progressive outlook as an official of his native city of Toronto and the great achievements and developments which he inspired and promoted in the affairs of that city, and, on the other, his staunch conservatism in respect of everything which had to do with the evolution of Canada from colonial status to nationhood.

Mr. Church was a staunch believer in British imperialism, and seemed to be quite unhappy that Canada should not always

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The late T. L. Church remain a dutiful daughter in her mother's house. His great sincerity, his unswerving consistency, the courtesy and warm-hearted kindness in all his dealings with his fellow men endeared him to us all; and the manner ill which he represented those who elected him will, I believe, for those who follow, stand as an example which will be his best memorial.

I am sure all hon. members of the house will wish to extend to his two sisters, to his countless friends, as well as to the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) and to his colleagues, sincere condolences on the passing of one who had become affectionately known and will long be remembered by all of us as Tommy Church.

Topic:   THE LATE THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH
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February 16, 1950