September 28, 1949

ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

In

case the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) may be too optimistic and the debate on the address should not be concluded shortly, will some provision be made to answer the questions now appearing on the order paper?

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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

If it is the desire of the house to have the questions answered tomorrow, I will ask my colleagues to be prepared to do so.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

That will be satisfactory.

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?

Jean-Paul Stephen St-Laurent

Mr. Si. Laurent:

Then the questions might be answered tomorrow.

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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

And notices of motion for the production of papers.

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
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TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES REMOVAL OF OPERATING HEADQUARTERS FROM WINNIPEG TO MONTREAL


On the orders of the day:


CCF

William Scottie Bryce

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. William Bryce (Selkirk):

Can the

Minister of Trade and Commerce add anything to his statement of September 19 in reply to my question regarding the transfer of Trans-Canada Air Lines personnel from Winnipeg to Montreal?

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES REMOVAL OF OPERATING HEADQUARTERS FROM WINNIPEG TO MONTREAL
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I expect the president of T.C.A., who has just returned from England, to be in my office this afternoon. I shall try to get the necessary information and give it to the house at an early date.

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES REMOVAL OF OPERATING HEADQUARTERS FROM WINNIPEG TO MONTREAL
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SPEECH FROM THE THRONE


The house resumed, from Monday, September 26, consideration of the motion of Mr. Maurice Boisvert for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session.


LIB

William Richard Kent

Liberal

Mr. W. R. Kent (Humber-Si. George's):

Mr. Speaker, when this debate was adjourned last Monday evening I had reached the point where the national convention had sent a delegation to the government of Canada to discuss the possible terms of union of Newfoundland with Canada. The delegation returned and reported the terms obtained to the national convention, where they were discussed at length. From what I have previously stated, it will be seen that the national convention had no power to decide the future form of the government of Newfoundland, but merely had the power to

recommend to His Majesty's government forms of government to be placed before the people in a referendum. By a vote of 29 to 16 the convention declined to recommend that confederation with Canada be included on the referendum ballot.

Because of the long discussion in the convention respecting confederation, and having regard to the number of members in the convention who had supported its inclusion on the ballot, His Majesty's government decided to place confederation on the ballot paper. In addition to this, some 50,000 Newfoundlanders, by personal letter or telegram, communicated to His Excellency the Governor their desire to have confederation placed on the ballot paper. The referendum was held, and the final result was a majority for confederation. It will be seen, therefore, that the procedure adopted to decide the future form of the government of Newfoundland was designed in a truly democratic manner to leave that decision to the people, and to the people alone. The vote was upon a clear-cut issue, and the people decided in favour of confederation with Canada. The results of the provincial and federal elections recently held in that province have placed the seal of approval on that decision.

I was, and still am, a strong believer in confederation. I have not found a solid argument against it. Those people in Newfoundland who supported confederation had good reason for supporting it. They believed that the economy of our province was linked with that of Canada, and that Newfoundland's best opportunity for future development was as a part of Canada. They saw the benefit in Canada's great social security program. Benefits to the people of Newfoundland have already accrued in the form of family allowances, increased old age pensions, the veterans' charter, unemployment insurance and others. On the other hand, Newfoundland brings to Canada her fisheries, pulp and paper and mining industries, her possibilities for water-power development, her airfields, and all her still undeveloped resources. One should consider also the value of this province from a strategic point of view in the scheme of hemisphere defence.

Perhaps I may be permitted to say a few words with reference to the riding of Humber-St. George's, which I have the privilege of representing. It is comprised of the three electoral districts of St. George's-Port au Port, Humber, and St. Barbe, and extends along the whole west coast of the island from cape Ray in the south to Boat harbour in the strait of Belle Isle in the north. The potentialities for development of the west coast of Newfoundland are very high. The lands comprising the fertile and beautiful valleys and

those enclosing the broad estuaries of the Great and Little Codroy rivers, as well as the valleys of the other rivers in St. George's-Port au Port, the valleys of the rich and scenic upper and lower Humber river, in the district of Humber, provide fertile land for farming and cattle raising. Much of this land has been developed, but much more is still open for development.

At Corner Brook, in the district of Humber, is the large pulp and paper mill owned by Bowater's Newfoundland Pulp and Paper Mills Limited. If not the largest, it is one of the largest pulp and paper mills in the world. The sea along the coast and in the bays abounds with fish of many species, from cod and herring to salmon, halibut and tuna. But here again, in my opinion, the possibilities for development have not yet been realized. As to shellfish, St. George's-Port au Port has great possibilities in clams, scallops and mussels, and the whole coast in lobster fishing.

Large tracts of timber are found upon the island, and these are being utilized in the pulp and paper and lumbering industry generally. The foothills in St. Barbe district are covered with dense forests, which, in several places, extend through to White bay. There is natural grassland on the island which could carry herds of cattle. The awe-inspiring hills which enclose the broad estuaries of the Codroy rivers, the majestic Humber, bay of Islands with the many arms extending from it, Bonne bay, and the rugged coast line, provide scenic beauty to delight the heart of any tourist. The inland country, viewed from the hills, presents the appearance of a succession of green plains marbled with woods and lakes. For the tourist there are the salmon rivers, the lakes and streams filled with trout, and the plains upon which game of every description native to the country can be found. These attractions have brought many visitors to Newfoundland. With more roads and better facilities, more tourists can be attracted to the island to enjoy the scenery and sport that can be offered to them.

One of Newfoundland's greatest needs is roads. This would enable tourists, if better facilities for crossing Cabot strait were provided, to come to Newfoundland in numbers with their cars and enjoy the pastimes which our province can afford.

There is one thing further I must mention, and that is the possibility for water-power development which is so essential to industry. As I have stated, the potentialities are great; all that is required is someone to develop the resources with which our province is endowed. I have noted with pleasure the reference in the speech from the throne to the trans-Canada highway. If that highway

The Address-Mr. Decore were extended to the province of Newfoundland, a great step in her development would have been taken.

The province of Newfoundland brings to Canada a loyal people. For years many of them have fought the elements in pursuing their livelihood on the sea around her coast and on the oceans of the world. Seamen of sterling quality have been produced. I am sure, sir, that the people of Newfoundland are wholeheartedly behind the union of Newfoundland with Canada. They will take their places as citizens of this great country and do their part in developing its future.

I deem it a pleasure and a privilege, Mr. Speaker, to sit in this historic chamber on the occasion of the entry of our province into union with Canada. It is an honour to be one of the first elected representatives from that province. So far as I am concerned, sir, I shall never forget the warmth of the welcome accorded me upon my entrance into this house.

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
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LIB

John Decore

Liberal

Mr. John Decore (Vegreville):

In rising to make a few observations in this debate Mr. Speaker, I wish to take this opportunity of complimenting you on the high position to which you have been called. This repetition may seem a bit monotonous, but I am sure there is no question about the sincerity of all of us in paying you this tribute. Your career in parliament over the last number of years and your conduct in the occupancy of the chair for the last number of days have certainly impressed all hon. members, particularly those who, like myself, are here for the first time. We feel that we can accept your guidance, and we know that your interpretation and application of the rules of the house will be fair and impartial.

I wish to join with others who have complimented the mover and the seconder of the address in reply to the speech from the throne. The manner in which the hon. member for Nicolet-Yamaska (Mr. Boisvert) and the hon. member for Vancouver South (Mr. Laing) acquitted themselves reflected credit upon themselves and brought honour to this house as well as to the constituencies which they represent.

In the course of this debate most hon. members made reference to the constituencies or districts from which they come. As one of the members from the west, I note with a great deal of satisfaction the pride that the members on the government side take in the members of the cabinet who come from the west. Those from Saskatchewan are proud of their Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner), those from Manitoba of their Minister of Justice (Mr. Garson), those from British Columbia of their Minister of Fisheries

The Address-Mr. Decore (Mr. Mayhew), and we in Alberta are certainly proud of our Hon. James A. MacKinnon.

Those who know something about our province will certainly agree with me that Alberta is highly developed in agriculture and richly endowed with natural resources. It is sometimes referred to as a province of vast plains and towering mountains, as well as a province in which the politics are of a queer type which no one is able to understand. I was informed some time ago by Professor Irving of Toronto university that he is writing a book on social credit. Should this learned professor succeed in throwing at least some light on what social credit stands for and what it means, he would be doing a great service not only to the people of Alberta but also to the hon. member for Peace River (Mr. Low) and his nine followers in this house.

I did not intend in this maiden speech of mine to refer to any political group. However, I was amused when, in the course of this debate, the hon. member for Peace River took to task the Montreal Star and the Lethbridge Herald when these two papers referred to the party that he is leading in this house as a splinter party. At page 41 of Hansard of September 19 he is reported as having made this statement:

What the Liberals did to the Conservative and the C.C.F. parties in the election of last June, and what they did not do to the Social Credit party, led me to believe at the time these articles appeared that the expression "splinter parties" simply could not refer to us.

I am not going to argue the point with reference to "splinter parties" except to say that with regard to the Alberta Social Credit party I think the expression is most appropriate. But in view of the statement made by the hon. member for Peace River, I think hon. members of this house should be given some information, based on facts and figures, as to what actually happened in Alberta on June 27 last.

In the last parliament there were two Conservative representatives from Alberta in this house. There are two in this parliament, the hon. member for Calgary East (Mr. Harkness) and the hon. member for Calgary West (Mr. Smith). They command a high respect in Alberta, and I only wish that they were on our side. However, we can conclude that the Conservative party were able to hold their own. The C.C.F. party did not have any representation from Alberta in this house in the last parliament, and they have none today. So we can conclude that this group in Alberta was also able to hold its own. What about the Social Credit party? There were two Liberal members from Alberta in this house in the last parliament. There are five of us

here today. The increase has been made entirely at the expense of the Social Credit party. But what is more significant is the fact that the Liberal popular vote in that province was approximately 117,000 as compared with

131,000 for the Social Credit candidates. How is it that the Liberals have only five members from Alberta, whereas the Social Credit party have twice as many? The illustration I want to bring out now is an example of what happened in many constituencies. For instance, in the Peace River constituency the hon. member from that area received in 1945 a majority of over 3,200 votes.

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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Low:

How many votes?

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

John Decore

Liberal

Mr. Decore:

I do not know how many votes, but the majority is over 3,200 votes.

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Low:

Give the number of votes.

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS ON ORDER PAPER
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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September 28, 1949