September 23, 1949

ATOMIC ENERGY

EXPLOSION IN U.S.S.R.-INTERNATIONAL CONTROL, AND USE FOR PEACEFUL PURPOSES


Right Kon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, I felt that my first public reference to the subject matter of the statements issued this morning by the President of the United States of America and by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom should be in this house. In the course of Mr. Truman's statement he said: We have evidence that within recent weeks an atomic explosion occurred in the U.S.S.R. Ever since atomic energy was first released by man, the eventual development of this new force by other nations was to be expected. This probability has always been taken into account by us. Nearly four years ago I pointed out that "scientific opinion appears to be practically unanimous that the essential theoretical knowledge upon which the discovery is based is already widely known. There is also substantial agreement that foreign research can come abreast of our present theoretical knowledge in time." And, in the three-nation declaration of the President of the United States and the prime ministers of the United Kingdom and of Canada, dated November 15, 1945, it was emphasized that no single nation could in fact have a monopoly of atomic weapons. This recent development emphasizes once again, if indeed such emphasis were needed, the necessity for that truly effective enforceable international control of atomic energy which my government and the large majority of the members of the United Nations support. On this occasion I would only say that the government of Canada associates itself fully with these observations, as it had done with the decision to make public the information contained in these statements. May I express the hope that with new knowledge may come a new sense of a shared responsibility for and an equal interest in agreeing on an effective enforceable international control of atomic energy so that this new force can be used solely for peaceful purposes.


FREIGHT RATES

JUDGMENT OF TRANSPORT BOARD


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

should like to direct a question to the Prime Minister. Does section 52 of the Railway Act

give the government the power to rescind or vary a decision of the judgment of the board of transport commissioners? If so, in view of the discriminatory structure of Canadian railway and express rates, will the government exercise its authority to delay the coming into effect of the board's decision until the house has had an opportunity of discussing the royal commission's report on the present rate structure of the railways?

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES
Subtopic:   JUDGMENT OF TRANSPORT BOARD
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION AS TO DELAYING ACTION
Permalink
?

Mr. Si. Laureni@

The Minister of Transport is prepared to answer the question.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES
Subtopic:   JUDGMENT OF TRANSPORT BOARD
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION AS TO DELAYING ACTION
Permalink
LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport):

The answer to the first question is that the powers of the governor in council under section 52 of the Railway Act are judicial in nature and have to my knowledge never been exercised since confederation with perhaps one exception in 1917, in the case of the McAdoo award.

The answer to the second question is that after giving consideration to the position, and without prejudice to appeal, the government does not intend to interfere with the judgment.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATES
Subtopic:   JUDGMENT OF TRANSPORT BOARD
Sub-subtopic:   QUESTION AS TO DELAYING ACTION
Permalink

FOREIGN EXCHANGE

DEVALUATION OF CANADIAN DOLLAR


On the orders of the day:


IND

John Lambert Gibson

Independent

Mr. J. L. Gibson (Comox-Alberni):

I should like to address a question to the Minister of Finance. Does he think the devaluation of the Canadian dollar will cause Canadian exporters to cut their prices in foreign markets? What would be the effect of such cuts upon our receipts of foreign exchange?

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Subtopic:   DEVALUATION OF CANADIAN DOLLAR
Sub-subtopic:   EXPORT PRICES
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Douglas Abbott (Minister of Finance):

The hon. member has given notice of this question, and I should like to answer it in this way. I would hope that Canadian exporters would not cut their prices unnecessarily. Canadian export prices have been competitive, and are relatively low compared with those in most other countries. If the prices at which our goods are sold abroad in terms of foreign currencies are reduced beyond what the competitive position requires, we shall get less foreign exchange. As I said the other day we need to receive all the foreign exchange we can get in order to enable us to pay for our imports and to keep our over-all trading account on the right side.

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Subtopic:   DEVALUATION OF CANADIAN DOLLAR
Sub-subtopic:   EXPORT PRICES
Permalink
IND

John Lambert Gibson

Independent

Mr. Gibson (Comox-Alberni):

May I ask

this supplementary question? If this course is followed, does it mean United States importers of Canadian products such as lumber and newsprint will be paying the same price in their currency as they formerly paid?

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Subtopic:   DEVALUATION OF CANADIAN DOLLAR
Sub-subtopic:   EXPORT PRICES
Permalink
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

Yes; that is right.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE
Subtopic:   DEVALUATION OF CANADIAN DOLLAR
Sub-subtopic:   EXPORT PRICES
Permalink

FISHERIES

PINK SALMON FISHING ON THE FRASER RIVER


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Angus Maclnnis (Vancouver East):

should like to ask a question of the Minister of Fisheries, based upon a telegram received today from Vancouver. Is it the intention of the department to close area 17 on the Fraser river to pink salmon fishing? If curtailment of fishing is necessary for conservation, could it not be met by extending the weekly escape period, so that the hundreds of small gill net fishermen could get their fair share of the catch?

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   PINK SALMON FISHING ON THE FRASER RIVER
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September 23, 1949