April 29, 1949

LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Pouliot:

Probably so, and other disreputable people. This is true not only in Vancouver but everywhere in Canada.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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?

An hon. Member:

Even Riviere du Loup.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Pouliot:

We have a police force in Riviere du Loup just as there is in Vancouver. In my city I pay taxes for the police just as my hon. friend in Vancouver must pay taxes for the police for the protection of himself, his family and his constituents. If there were no such police in Vancouver all the bums would be attracted by speeches like the one he has delivered tonight.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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CCF

Gladys Grace Mae Strum

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mrs. Strum:

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege. I wanted to vote for the Atlantic pact, but I have to catch a train in a few moments. In case I miss the boat I want the long-winded members to know I am in favour of the pact and if I were here I would vote for the motion.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Pouliot:

I congratulate my hon. friend on coming to the house while I was making my speech, and I say that is my reward. I am most grateful to her for that, and I wish her a trip that will be just as good as her speech.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

James Sinclair (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. Sinclair:

One way.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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CCF

Gladys Grace Mae Strum

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mrs. Strum:

You are not up to your usual form.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Pouliot:

Mr. Speaker, I was explaining the necessity for police in the world. If the member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Young) were appointed lecturer to the police force of any city in Canada, the force would be dismissed at once as no good. I tell you, sir, that I have never listened to such a strange performance as the one that has been put on by my hon. friend. At the present time I am most lenient to the new members. I want to give them a chance.

At an earlier stage today the member spoke on behalf of his party. He said "We socialists; we tailors of Tooley Street, Vancouver." Afterwards, he was expressing his views and he had a right to do so. Then, he was speaking again in the name of his party.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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CCF

Wilbert Ross Thatcher

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Thatcher:

No, he was not; he was speaking for himself.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Pouliot:

He led us to believe that he was speaking on behalf of his party and I am

very glad to hear the member for Moose Jaw (Mr. Thatcher) say no. I am not surprised that he said no.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

I spoke on behalf of the party.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. Pouliot:

I will not say anything about my own appreciation of what he said, sir. When we have listened to what has been said about this pact by the leaders of the various groups in the house, and then when we listen to a speech such as that delivered by the member on a matter of such importance, which concerns the life of all Canadians, may I say, speaking as a member of parliament, that I am deeply offended. It is a matter that must be considered seriously and I am sure that if the hon. gentleman does not mend his ways, if he continues speaking in that manner, he will do considerable harm to his party in spite of the very fine speeches that are made by the leader of the group and by so many able members who belong to it. I do not say that as a matter of censorship, but as a member of parliament who wants to do his duty-a duty he has to perform as a matter of trust.

Just one more word, Mr. Speaker. The matter is serious. The other day I said that international sovereignty was nonsense and it has been reported wrongly in Hansard. I said what I believed. I do not believe in international sovereignty. I believe also that instead of having pacts made in other countries by the former major powers, we should have our own pact with all other nations of the world.

But, Mr. Speaker, there is something else that I want to stress before you. It is that for a long time I have complained of the fact of the distinction between major powers and little countries. In the security council of the United Nations, Canada was there in turn. But in the United Nations organization everything was decided by the major powers. Countries like Canada, Australia and others had their say only at times, we had no status of equality, whilst in the Atlantic pact all are equal. For me the Atlantic pact is much superior to the United Nations organization. That is one point.

There is another point. I remember that my friend the hon. member for Peace River (Mr. Low), the leader of the Social Credit group, my good friend Tommy Church from Toronto, who is probably being nominated tonight as candidate in this coming election, and myself were called irresponsible by a dirty paper of Montreal because we were telling the truth. We were saying that the United Nations organization was going on the rocks. I compliment my friend the leader of the Social Credit group and my good friend

the hon. member for Broadview (Mr. Church) for having joined me in protesting on that occasion. Were we right or were we not? Who was irresponsible? Was it the members of parliament who foresaw what was going to happen?-namely the downfall of the United Nations, to be replaced by a new organization, the Atlantic pact, which I hope will work well.

I have been invited to speak, Mr. Speaker, and I do so, although I do not intend to speak for any great length of time. The time of reckoning has come. We were good Canadian citizens and we were patriots in saying then what has happened since.

I want to be protected. As the United Nations organization has proved to be a failure and as some great nations of the world, especially our powerful neighbour, the United States of America, the countries of the British commonwealth, France, Benelux, some Scandinavian countries, Portugal and others are joining together for defence and protection, I will be for it. I want to give the Atlantic pact a chance. I do not want to stay behind. In these troubled times we need some protection against nations that may invade our country at any time. But I do not want the rule of brass hats; and I hope that the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Claxton) will tell the generals, who have been touring the country exciting the people and speaking as warmongers, to stop doing so. I hope that the work of the united nations who have signed the Atlantic pact will be effective, that in the near future the atmosphere will be cleared, and that we shall have peace throughout the world.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is the house ready for the question?

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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?

Some hon. Members:

Question.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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LIB

Louis Orville Breithaupt

Liberal

Mr. L. O. Breiihaupi (Waterloo North):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to present the fifth report of the standing committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines, and I move this supplementary motion:

That the recommendations contained in the fifth report of the standing committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines, presented this day to the house respecting capital stock charges on Bill 240, (letter D-8 of the Senate), an act to incorporate West-coast Transmission Company Limited, and Bill 243, (letter G-8 of the Senate), an act to incorporate Western Pipe Lines, be now concurred in.

Topic:   NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TREATY SIGNED AT WASHINGTON ON APRIL 4, 1949
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Motion agreed to.


BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of ihe Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, before any motion is put I should like to make a suggestion which I think may facilitate proceedings. Before the dinner hour the house was in committee, and supply was being discussed. Quite contrary to the statement made by someone who spoke just before dinner, and who assumed responsibility for indicating what our decision had been, it is not our intention to prevent supply. *

We have presented our objections. We have, I believe, covered them fully. We have stated what our case is, and we have called for a vote, which was in the nature of a want of confidence vote, and one which expresses our position. I believe that if we now went back into the committee stage we might advance with supply and then be that much closer to the proceedings of tomorrow.

In saying this I should like to explain why I regard this as the desirable course. The government has assumed the responsibility of announcing dissolution; and that course, it is recognized, has to be followed. I need not add to the opinion I have already expressed as to the procedure which has been followed -to do so would be only to repeat what is already on the record.

The business of the people must go on in any event during the course of the election campaign, and for a sufficient time beyond that to make it possible to carry on the business before parliament can reassemble. Therefore the only alternative with which the house is confronted is the alternative of supply or of proceeding with governor general's warrants. I am convinced, myself, that there are certain limitations upon the use of governor general's warrants, which may not have been fully recognized, and I feel there is no occasion for us to create any uncertainty as to the fulfilment of public

business while this election campaign is under way, and for sufficient time thereafter to call together a new parliament.

Therefore, having stated our case, we will facilitate the proceedings which are before us.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, I was going to ask the Prime Minister if it was the intention to move that the house sit tomorrow. If it is the intention that we pass such a motion, then may I say that this has been a very long and very arduous day. These have been two days, indeed, in which we have had to listen to long speeches on occasion; and I wish to say, Mr. Speaker, that I think we would advance the business of the house more if we adjourned now and got a good night's rest.

I am not in favour of falling in with the suggestion made by some who have taken up a tremendous amount of time in this house during the past few days. I am going to object to the house sitting beyond this hour.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

The hon. member said that if a motion was made to sit tomorrow he would feel that he would have to object to sitting further this evening. A motion was moved at 5.45 this afternoon providing that the house sit tomorrow at eleven o'clock, and that the intermissions and order of business be the same as today. That motion was agreed to. There remains the matter of supply and third reading of the bills that have been reported from the standing committee.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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April 29, 1949