March 28, 1949

?

Jean-Paul Stephen St-Laurent

Mr. Si. Laurent:

The hon. member is not making any offer at all. He asks if I will agree not to have this motion dealt with until tomorrow. The motion has reference only to this day, and when he says he will be prepared to consent to have the other matter considered tomorrow, that is an offer which involves nothing whatsoever.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTIONS ON MONDAY, MARCH 28
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PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Church:

I should like to see the motion of the Prime Minister carried today, because the proposal of which he gave notice on Friday involves the most important business before the house this session.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTIONS ON MONDAY, MARCH 28
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt the motion?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTIONS ON MONDAY, MARCH 28
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BPC

Maxime Raymond

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. Raymond (Beauharnois-Laprairie):

No.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTIONS ON MONDAY, MARCH 28
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

On division.

Motion agreed to on division.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTIONS ON MONDAY, MARCH 28
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TELEVISION

STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT POLICY

LIB

James Joseph McCann (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Hon. J. J. McCann (Minister of National Revenue):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to make a statement of government policy in reference to television.

The government has for some time been considering how television broadcasting could be developed in Canada in a way that would best serve the national interest. The early stages in the growth of television in other countries have been carefully observed, and the serious problems, which were seen to exist in both the production and transmission pf television broadcasts, have been studied. It was realized that television would go through a difficult and costly period of experiment. During this phase, which has not been entirely completed, it seemed wise to delay the introduction of television in Canada, and also to provide for further and more extensive study of methods which would be suitable to Canada. For this reason the government proposes to include television as one of the subjects of inquiry for the royal commission on national development in the arts, letters and sciences which is now being established.

In the meantime, however, while the commission is conducting its inquiry, the government has decided that the development of a Canadian television system on an interim basis should be undertaken. By entering the field now, Canada will benefit substantially from the experience of others in the establishment of proper facilities and operating methods. A further advantage of development at the present time will arise from the large new outlet which will be provided for

the electronics industry. Television will help to maintain and materially increase the contribution of this important industry to our national life.

From a social point of view, experiments in other countries have made it abundantly clear that television will become one of the most effective means of mass communication yet devised. This new medium can be of great benefit to the national life of Canada if properly developed. On the other hand, it could have a negative or even detrimental effect on our national life if it grew in a haphazard and unco-ordinated manner.

In making plans for television, the government has been primarily concerned to provide that Canadians in various parts of Canada will have the opportunity to receive Canadian programs. To ensure that this shall take place, the government is prepared to give the necessary support for the establishment of facilities in Canada that will meet the desire of the Canadian people to have a television system of their own. Because of our relatively small and scattered population, special efforts will be required to link together different parts of the country by vision as well as sound. For these reasons, it is clear that a large measure of public participation in television will be necessary.

It is not the intention, however, to exclude private operations from the field of television. The development of radio broadcasting in Canada through a combination of public and private enterprise, in a manner which a vast majority of disinterested Canadians approve and support, has shown the feasibility of this method of procedure. The Canadian Broadcasting Act provides that, for radio, there shall be a national system publicly owned and operated and that there shall also be private stations, the operations of which are co-ordinated with those of the national facilities. This procedure will be adopted, with suitable adjustments, for the development of television. The public operation of television will be established, to be supported by those who benefit from the system. At the same time private stations which will share in the development of television will be licensed. The government believes that in this way television will become a means of encouraging Canadian talent, of expressing Canadian ideals, of serving the needs of the country as a whole, and of stimulating and strengthening our national life and consciousness.

The government, therefore, proposes to adopt the following interim plan:

1. The general direction of television broadcasting in Canada will, in accordance with the Canadian Broadcasting Act, be entrusted to the board of governors of the Canadian 29087-130

Television

Broadcasting Corporation who will arrange for television operations by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and by licensed private stations.

2. In order to provide the required services, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation will-

(a) establish at this time national television production centres in Montreal and Toronto;

(b) provide a service of television programs for broadcasting by stations which may be established in other areas of Canada, thus furnishing part of their programming. This service will be provided by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation either by means of kinescope recordings or by direct physical relays when available. The number of national system programs which any private station carries, and the terms on which they will be made available will be primarily a matter for negotiation and arrangement. The government considers, however, that a certain minimum of national programs should be carried by each television station;

(c) establish transmitting stations in Montreal and Toronto.

3. In any city or area in Canada, including Montreal and Toronto, a licence to establish one private station will be granted to a private organization giving adequate assurances of financial means and of service. In view of the high cost of television operations, it is felt that individuals or groups interested in establishing a private station in any city may wish to form an association for the purpose of applying for a licence.

4. In regard to network arrangements, whether by teletranscriptions or direct physical hookups, the same principles will apply as in the case of radio broadcasting.

It will be some time before there are enough receiving sets in Canada for television licence fees and commercial revenues to cover costs of programming and operations. It is necessary, therefore, for the government to provide loans to the C.B.C. to cover capital costs of its necessary installations and to support the development of the service. For these purposes parliament will be asked to approve a loan of $4 million this year. It is expected that the national television operations will become self-supporting from licence fees and commercial revenues in a few years.

The plan by no means provides for the exclusion of non-Canadian material from our television channels. The public will wish Canadian stations, both public and private to carry some good programs from other countries. The national plan does make possible, however, a core of Canadian television broadcasting, reaching an increasing number of Canadians across the country.

Questions

The government believes that this national plan provides for the minimum amount of public support and co-ordination necessary to provide for the adequate development of television in Canada. It also provides conditions under which private organizations will have opportunities to use television channels, but in doing so will contribute to the building of nation-wide Canadian television service, at the same time being assisted in good programming by the national system.

Topic:   TELEVISION
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT POLICY
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

May I ask the minister a question arising out of the statement he has just read? Will the radio committee have an opportunity of reviewing this policy and reporting to the house before the house is called upon to approve the loan of $4 million?

Topic:   TELEVISION
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT POLICY
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LIB

James Joseph McCann (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. McCann:

The answer is definitely yes.

Topic:   TELEVISION
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT POLICY
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TABLING OF INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT


Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce): I desire to lay on the table two copies in English and two copies in French of the international wheat agreement now open for signature at Washington. As this document is of general interest, if I may have the consent of the house I would ask that it be printed in Votes and Proceedings.


ALLEGED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS EXPORTED FOR SLAUGHTER

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture):

I should like to read the answer to a question which was asked by the member for Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis) on March 21, 1949, when I was absent from the house. The question reads as follows:

I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Agriculture, but in his absence, I shall ask his parliamentary assistant. Have representations been made to the Department of Agriculture alleging extreme cruelty to horses exported for slaughter from this country to Europe? Has the government given consideration to prohibiting the export of horses for slaughter?

The answer is as follows: Representations have been made to the department that horses shipped to Belgium for food purposes have been subject to undue cruelty. Reports made by competent officials of the department who witnessed the loading in Canada and the unloading in Belgium of some of these shipments are at variance with reports which have implied that the horses were subjected to unnecessary suffering. If shipments are resumed this year it will be possible for the department to check very closely into the various phases of the trade in order that all the facts may be assembled.

The answer to the first part of the question answers the second part. I should like to add that the government has had nothing to do with these transactions except the usual checks that are made of trade passing in and out of Canada.

Topic:   ALLEGED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS EXPORTED FOR SLAUGHTER
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


ST. LAWRENCE RIVER ICEBREAKING OPERATIONS

PC

Mr. Hatfield:

Progressive Conservative

1. What did it cost to open navigation on the St. Lawrence river each year from 1940?

2. When did icebreaking operations start each year?

3. How many icebreakers were used each year?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ST. LAWRENCE RIVER ICEBREAKING OPERATIONS
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LIB

Mr. Chevrier: (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

1. Specific segregation of the cost of opening navigation each year is not maintained. The personnel and equipment used for that purpose are used also for other items of aids to navigation services, such as supplying lighthouses, laying buoys, transporting supplies to outposts (sometimes to the far north), convoying vessels, salvage and rescue work; and such other duties are frequently carried out simultaneously with the breaking of ice.

2. Date of beginning of icebreaking operations: opening of channel Three Rivers-Montreal.

1940

February 261941

February 251942

February 181943

February 121944

February 201945

March 11946

February 71947

February 101948

February 231949

February 9

From December 1, icebreakers were on standby for assistance to shipping, ice jams and emergency work.

3. Three.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ST. LAWRENCE RIVER ICEBREAKING OPERATIONS
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PURCHASE OF SHIPS FROM THE CROWN

March 28, 1949