March 4, 1949

LIB

Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works):

Yesterday the hon. member for Queens (Mr. McLure) asked the following question, as reported on page 1093 of Hansard:

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Public Works, or the Minister of Veterans Affairs. Were public tenders called for the alterations to Camp Hill hospital annex at Halifax, and if so, when, and what was the contractor's price?

Public tenders were called at the beginning of 1945, and were received on April 18, 1945. The following are the bids that were made:

E. G. M. Cape and Company Limited .... $1,934,921

Fundy Construction Company. Halifax ... 1,991,000

Nova Scotia Construction Company 2,133,600

Foundation Maritime Limited 2,192.837

On May 15 the contract was awarded to the lowest tenderer, E. G. M. Cape and Company Limited.

Topic:   CAMP HILL HOSPITAL
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO QUESTION AS TO CONTRACT FOR ALTERATIONS TO ANNEX
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EASTER ADJOURNMENT


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

should like to direct a question to the Prime Minister. To those of us who come from the farthest parts of the country the date and length of the Easter recess may be of greater interest than they are to those who are privileged to go home over the week ends. In view of the variety of opinion expressed in

the press as to the possible length of the recess, is the Prime Minister in position to let us in on the secret?

Topic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

There is no secret about it. I have been talking to the whip on our side, and he tells me that he has been discussing the matter with various members but finds that there is perhaps as great a divergence of opinion as there is in the newspaper stories. No decision has been arrived at, but it does seem to me that we have to choose between a short recess at Easter, perhaps from Good Friday to Easter Monday, and one that would give hon. members from all parts of the country an opportunity to go home if they saw fit to do so, thus necessitating a recess of a couple of weeks.

I think if we are to have the longer recess it might be just as well to take both the week before Easter and Easter week. In any event they are both only partial weeks. Such a recess would give hon. members from all parts of the country time to get to their respective homes and have a few days there before being required to come back. The choice between the alternatives will probably have to depend upon what progress we can make in the meantime, because the business of parliament will have to be discharged. I hope we shall have made such progress that the longer recess will appear to be justified, not only to ourselves but to the public.

Topic:   EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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TRADE WITH BRITAIN

REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES


On the orders of the day:


PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. T. L. Church (Broadview):

I should like to ask the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) a question. Has the government any statement to make on the recent report by Charles F. Brennan, secretary of agriculture in President Truman's cabinet, that he was declaring wheat a surplus commodity in the United States under the European recovery program? What reduction will it make in-or will it eliminate entirely-Marshall plan dollars for the purchase in Canada of non-American wheat? How will it affect Canada?

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Information did come to us this morning, although not officially, about this statement by the secretary of agriculture in the United States that wheat was surplus. We were somewhat disturbed about it, although it would appear that the appropriations being urged upon congress at the present time for United States dollars in aid of the recovery of the United Kingdom are not being reduced.

Inquiries of the Ministry

Of course those United States dollars are important, perhaps essential, to the recovery of the United Kingdom; but they are only a portion of the dollars the United Kingdom government has for its requirements abroad It may be that it is more important to the United Kingdom that the number of United States dollars under ERP remain the same than it is to have them attributed to any special commodity.

I hope that whatever is done will not affect the capacity of the United Kingdom to carry out those contracts it has made with us, both for 1948-49 and for 1949-50. It should not affect the capacity of the United Kingdom to carry out those contracts if the same number of ERP dollars is available to pay for part of the requirements of commodities the United Kingdom must import.

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

Will the government consider making a statement to the house, as requested by me some time ago, as to ways and means of increasing British exports to Canada, in order that Great Britain may have the dollars to meet her needs for the commodities which we have to sell?

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Douglas Abbott (Minister of Finance):

If I may reply to the question, I had it in mind to speak on that question in this debate, because it has been raised on a number of occasions. I ha* intended to outline to the house the numerous ways in which for a number of years past Canada has made special efforts to encourage the importation of United Kingdom goods. I am not prepared to say whether I will do that in this debate or at a later stage-possibly in the course of my budget remarks. But I want to make the statement now: there is no real impediment to the importation of British goods into Canada, other than the difficulty which, understandably, the United Kingdom is experiencing in expanding her production of goods which we require, and placing them in the Canadian market at competitive prices.

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

What about the non-discriminatory clause of the Geneva agreement?

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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PC

John Thomas Hackett

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hackett:

At competitive prices.

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

I said that.

Topic:   TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Subtopic:   REPORTED DECLARATION OF WHEAT AS SURPLUS IN UNITED STATES
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SPEECH FROM THE THRONE

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed from Thursday, March 3, consideration of the motion of Mr. D. F. Brown for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the amendment thereto of Mr. Drew, and the amendment to the amendment of Mr. Coldwell. 1142 HOUSE OF The Address-Mr. Argue


CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. H. R. Argue (Wood Mountain):

Mr. Speaker, when the house rose last night I had been dealing with a number of subjects, one of which was the policy of the government in respect to improving health facilities throughout Canada. I had referred to a number of orders in council that had been passed by the government. One particular order in council provided for an increase-

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. I must say to hon. members that there is so much noise in the house that the hon. member who has the floor cannot be heard.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 4, 1949