January 31, 1949

THE LATE NORMAN JAQUES

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure that in common with all the other members of this house you were shocked to learn this morning of the death of Mr. Norman -Jaques, member for the electoral district of Wetaskiwin. We knew that some years ago Mr. Jaques had suffered from a serious coronary attack, but he seemed to have made a complete recovery. From his appearance in the house last week, one would have judged he was enjoying his usual good health. I understand he had a slight coronary disturbance on Thursday evening, but afterwards had been resting rather comfortably. But a further attack developed in the early hours of this morning, and it proved to be fatal.

Mr. Jaques was first elected to this house at the general election of 1935, and was re-elected at both general elections in 1940 and 1945. Those of us who were here during those years know that he was constant in his attendance in the house and took an active interest in its proceedings and in the proceedings of many of its important committees. On many matters he held strong views which most of us did not share, but no one could doubt his sincerity or his earnest desire to be of service to his fellow Canadians in the advocacy of those views. In his relations with other members of the house he was always most courteous. I am sure he will be remembered as an earnest, painstaking and courtly gentleman who served his constituents and his fellow citizens with zeal and devotion.

I wish to express to the members of the Social Credit group our deep sympathy. I am sure I shall also be expressing the wish of members in all parts of this house when I ask you, sir, to convey to Mrs. Jaques and to her two daughters, the assurance of our sincere condolence in their bereavement.

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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to associate myself with the words of sympathy uttered by the Prime Minister in regard to the untimely death of Mr. Jaques. I did not have the opportunity of knowing Mr. Jaques, but I join with the Prime Minister in extending

deep sympathy to Mr. Jaques' family and to those who were so closely associated with him in this house. I concur in the suggestion that a message be conveyed to Mrs. Jaques and her daughters in the terms expressed by the Prime Minister.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

May

we join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew) in expressing our sympathy to Mrs. Jaques and her two daughters in their sudden bereavement. We often disagreed fundamentally, and sometimes violently, with the late member for Wetaskiwin. None the less we do know that the views he expressed in this house were held sincerely and arose from deep conviction, and for this we respected him, as we respect any member who speaks from sincerity and conviction. We therefore join in expressing to the Social Credit group, as well as to the widow and family, our sympathy in the sudden loss they have all sustained.

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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, there can be no more striking evidence of the integrity of the members of this house than the sincere and earnest tributes that are paid to an hon. member who has passed away, in spite of the fact that those expressing them may have held strongly divergent views. I wish to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and with the leaders of the other two parties in expressing our sincere regret at the passing of our friend and colleague, Mr. Jaques.

We were shocked to learn of his passing at an early hour this morning. Mr. Jaques arrived in the city last week to attend the present session of parliament, apparently in very good health. He was in this chamber on Thursday, and no one at that time had the remotest thought that that would be his last day in this house.

On Thursday evening, as the Prime Minister has already stated, Mr. Jaques suffered a slight coronary seizure, which at that time was not considered to be unduly serious. There seemed to be good reason to expect an early recovery, but a more serious and intense seizure, which occurred at two o'clock this morning, within a period of ten or fifteen minutes proved fatal.

Mr. Jaques was born in England. He came to Canada when he was twenty-one years old

Tribute to Mr. Norman Jaques and took up farming in central Alberta, where he lived for the remainder of his life. He was always a reformer. For that reason, when Major C. H. Douglas of Scotland first issued his economic analysis Mr. Jaques was attracted to the new philosophy and at once became a keen student, not only of economics but of world affairs. He pioneered in the organization of the Social Credit movement of the world.

As has already been attested by those who have spoken, my colleague was a man of deep convictions. His determination was unshakable. These qualities, together with a high degree of personal courage, often drove him into vigorous debate as well as into strong denunciation of what he firmly believed to be social injustices or real threats to the peace and happiness of the people of the world. In spite of the fact that much personal criticism was directed to him, often amounting almost to character assassination, he stuck to his convictions, and to the very end continued in what he thought was his duty to humanity.

I found Mr. Jaques honest, sincere, humble, and ready to learn, in spite of his rock-like stubbornness when he thought he was right There was in him in rare measure, I also found, a deep love for his fellow men and a respect for their individual rights. In my duties as leader of the Social Credit movement, I found Mr. Jaques loyal and always ready to carry the battle forward.

Almost six years ago in his home in Alberta he suffered a coronary occlusion which resulted in his being confined to bed for several months. He knew that his health was seriously impaired as a result of that seizure. But in spite of that knowledge, his conviction and his concern about the steady deterioration of world affairs drove him like a goad, with the result that he remained active all through these years. No doubt the strain of that activity contributed to his death.

We, his colleagues in the Social Credit movement, mourn his passing. We have lost in him a devoted advocate and a warm personal friend. Our deep sympathy goes out to Mrs. Jaques and her two daughters, in the loss of husband and father, and to all bereaved friends and relatives. I am sure Mrs. Jaques would want me to thank all those who have so generously tendered their condolences and expressions of sympathy. This I do.

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PC

Arthur Leroy Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. A. L. Smith (Calgary West):

As a member of the party to which I have the honour to belong, and coming from the province in which Norman Jaques so long made his home, I am anxious to join in the tributes paid to him on the occasion of his sudden death. We

who were best acquainted with him always knew that he was serious, even when in advocating a principle he stood alone. Then, more than ever, we admired his courage in that advocacy.

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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. Blackmore (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, two remarks that were made to me rather casually within the last hour or so I thought might express fairly well the general opinion of those who knew Mr. Jaques. One member of the opposition, although not a member of the Social Credit group, said to me "Too bad about Mr. Jaques. He was the very soul of integrity". A few minutes later one of the messengers who knew Mr. Jaques met me in one of the corridors and said, "I am sorry about Mr. Jaques; he was such a nice, quiet man."

Mr. Jaques was always a diligent, industrious worker and student. He wrote great numbers of letters; wherever there was a hint of an opening he sent one to a newspaper, a periodical or an individual. He read widely and voraciously. He spoke at a public meeting whenever an invitation came from anywhere on the American continent. He therefore became well informed and full of understanding. He was an able speaker and writer.

He was honest in the extreme.

He was a man of resolute courage. With his heart attack, which has already been referred to, I need not deal at all. For a good many years I have feared that we might lose Mr. Jaques as we now finally have lost him.

After his illness Mr. Jaques put himself under severe self-discipline in order to do the work he felt he should do in this house. He strove in every way he knew to recover his health; but he kept fighting on. Many a time I have sat by his side in this house while he spoke, holding his chair that he might support himself against its arm, and fearful that at any moment he might collapse in the chamber. In debate he was greatly handicapped. His voice did not carry well. His fine English, gentlemanly habits rendered it foreign to his impulses that he should engage in wordy battles. Despite those handicaps he persevered and drove home his message, frequently at the risk of his life.

He was loyal to his leader. Throughout the ten trying years during which I was charged with the responsibility of leading the Social Credit group in this house, Mr. Jaques stood steadily behind me. He often wrestled with me long and sternly over points of political strategy, or concerning certain forms of the practical application of the fundamental principles of social credit; but when the need was greatest, he was with me. Since the hon.

TMr. Low.]

member for Peace River (Mr. Low) assumed the leadership, Mr. Jaques has been just as loyal to him.

Mr. Jaques was loyal to principle. He regarded the founder of social credit, Major C. H. Douglas, as a sort of inspired prophet heralding across the world the vital doctrines of a new gospel of freedom and security from want and fear; a prophet calling the peoples, particularly the Anglo-Saxon peoples, to repentance from their unpardonable sins of selfishness, ignorance and blindness: calling them to awaken, to realize how rich are the material gifts with which their God has endowed them; how greatly, through the Anglo-Saxons, all families of the earth could be temporally blessed, and how fearful will be the responsibility upon the Anglo-Saxons if they fail.

Mr. Jaques always gave me the impression that he looked upon himself as being called as a sort of apostle of the new economics of abundance and equitable distribution. If he did so, then he magnified that calling ably and well.

In the midst of the battle he has fallen. The torch he so bravely held aloft must still be borne forward. Never in human history has the need been more urgent for enlightenment concerning the principles of social credit for which he stood. Social credit's quarrel with the foe must be carried deeper and deeper into the ranks of the opposition. Mr. Jaques has gone to his rest. But others must carry on.

His wife and children will be able to endure their bereavement the better knowing that throughout his life the husband and father did his full share so well.

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MINES AND RESOURCES

TABLING OF ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1947

LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. MacKinnon (Minisler of Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, I am informed that the annual report of the Department of Mines and Resources for the year 1947 was not received until after the close of the last session. I am therefore tabling it now.

Topic:   MINES AND RESOURCES
Subtopic:   TABLING OF ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1947
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CIVIL SERVICE ACT

PREFERENCE TO COMPETITORS SPEAKING BOTH LANGUAGES

IND

Bona Arsenault

Independent

Mr. Bona Arsenault (Bonaveniure) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 5, to amend the Civil Service Act (examinations).

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT
Subtopic:   PREFERENCE TO COMPETITORS SPEAKING BOTH LANGUAGES
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?

Some hon. Members:

Explain.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT
Subtopic:   PREFERENCE TO COMPETITORS SPEAKING BOTH LANGUAGES
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IND

Bona Arsenault

Independent

Mr. Arsenault:

This bill provides an amendment to section 29 of the Civil Service Act by adding the following subsection:

(3) In preparing the list mentioned in subsections one and two of this section, the commission

Proposed, Legislation

shall, for appointments to positions in the province of Quebec, give preference to the competitors who have, by the examination, been shown to be capable of speaking and writing correctly the French language and who have been shown at the same time to have a working knowledge of the English language, and shall for appointments to positions in the other provinces give preference to the competitors who have, by the examination, been shown to be capable of speaking and writing correctly the English language and who have been shown at the same time to have a working knowledge of the French language.

The reason for this amendment is to promote the learning of both official languages of our country, by Canadians of both English and French extraction, especially among those who seek positions in the civil service. Therefore this bill, if enacted into law, would be a contribution to better understanding between French and English speaking Canadians, and a means of promoting national unity.

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Subtopic:   PREFERENCE TO COMPETITORS SPEAKING BOTH LANGUAGES
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PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Church:

That is contrary to the British North America Act, is it not?

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT
Subtopic:   PREFERENCE TO COMPETITORS SPEAKING BOTH LANGUAGES
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REVISED STATUTES OF CANADA ACT

SUBSTITUTION OF "CANADA" FOR "DOMINION OF CANADA" ETC.

IND

Bona Arsenault

Independent

Mr. Bona Arsenault (Bonaventure) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 6, to amend an act respecting the Revised Statutes of Canada.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES OF CANADA ACT
Subtopic:   SUBSTITUTION OF "CANADA" FOR "DOMINION OF CANADA" ETC.
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?

Some hon. Members:

Explain.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES OF CANADA ACT
Subtopic:   SUBSTITUTION OF "CANADA" FOR "DOMINION OF CANADA" ETC.
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January 31, 1949