June 28, 1948

REPORTS AND PAPERS


Report of Canadian delegation to united nations conference on freedom of information, held at Geneva, March 23 to April 21, 1948,- Mr. St. Laurent. Old age pensions regulations, established by order in council P.C. I860 of April 29, 1948.- Mr. Martin.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


PAPER AND METAL CURRENCY

SC

Mr. ASHBY:

Social Credit

1. How much new paper money was issued in each of the years 1927 to 1947?

2. What are the names of the companies which made this paper money?

3. What year was this paper money printed?

4. What were the denominations of this paper money ?

5. Do the people of Canada own this paper money?

6. If not, who or what institution claims ownership of this paper money?

7. How much metal money (coins) was issued in each of the years 1927 to 1047?

8. In what years or year was this metal money minted?

9. What -were the denominations of this metal money?

10. Do the people of Canada own this metal money?

11. If not, who or what institution claims ownership of this metal money?

12. How many units of account or symbol dollars w^ere created in each of the years 1927 to 1947?

13. What are the names of the institutions or companies vrhich created these units of account or symibol dollars?

14. Do the people of Canada own this symbol or credit money?

15. If not, who or what institution or companies claim to own this symibol money?

16. Has any other kind of legal money than the above been created and issued by any institution or individuals in Canada?

17. If not, from what source does interest money come?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PAPER AND METAL CURRENCY
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LIB

Mr. BELZILE: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

1. Total active note circulation (Bank ofCanada notes, dominion notes in public cirdilation and chartered bank note circulation,the latter being an approximate figure only since 1944) Amount Netout- changestanding duringDec. 31 year(In millions of dollars) 1926

209 . .1927

215 +61928

222 +71929

213 -91930

184 -291931

175 -91932 -181933

162 +51934

173 +111935

1S3 + 101936

200 +171937

214 + 141938

216 +21939

253 +371940

347 +941941 ....

449 + 1021942 ....

619 + 1701943 ....

769 +1501944 ....

910 + 1411945 ....

989 +791946

1,030 +411947

1.029 -12. If this question means the companies that printed bank notes, the answer is the Canadian Bank Note Company Limited and the British American Bank Note Company Limited.3. Such notes have been printed in every year for many years past.4. Dominion notes were issued in denominations of 25 cents, $1, 82, $4, S5, $50. $500, $1,000, $5,000 and $50,000. Bank of Canada notes have been issued in the denominations of $1, $2. $5, $10, $20, $25, $50. $100, $500 and $1,000. Chartered bank notes have been issued in the denominations of $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

5 and 6. This paper money is owned by the particular individuals, firms and corporations which have it in their possession.

Questions

7. Amount of subsidiary coins estimated to be outstanding:

Amount Net

out- change

standing during

Dec. 31 year

(In millions of dollars)

1926

30 ..1927

30 ..1928

31 +11929

32 +11930

321931

33 +r1932

33 ..1933

33 ..1934

34 +11935

341936

341937

35 +11938

37 +21939

39 i 21940

45 +61941

49 +41942

54 +51943

64 -1-101944

69 +51945

74 +51947

76 ^8. Canadian subsidiary coinage has been issued every year since 1858.9. Subsidiary coins are issued in the denominations of lc, 5c, 10c, 25c, 50c and SI.

10 and 11. These coins are owned by the particular individuals, firms and corporations which have the coins in their possession.

12. It is not possible to answer this question as its meaning is not clear.

13, 14 and 15. Answered by No. 12.

16. Legal tender money in Canada consists of Bank of Canada notes; silver coin for a payment of an amount not exceeding ten dollars; nickel coin for a payment of an amount not exceeding five dollars and bronze coins for a payment of an amount not exceeding twenty-five cents. In addition gold coins of Canada issued in the denominations of $2.50, $5, $10 and $20, gold coins of the United States issued in the denominations of $5, $10 and $20 and the British sovereign or any other gold coin of the United Kingdom being a multiple or division of the sovereign, are legal tender in Canada.

17. It is not possible to answer this question as its meaning is not clear.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PAPER AND METAL CURRENCY
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STEEL FOR MANUFACTURE OF NAILS

CCF

Mr. KNIGHT:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. How much additional steel has been released for nail manufacture since the passing of the order in council of June 1, 1948?

2. What companies received additional material, and in what quantities?

3. Has any steel for nail making been released to (a) Saskatchewan Federated Co-operatives Limited; (b) any co-operative company?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STEEL FOR MANUFACTURE OF NAILS
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LIB

Mr. McILRAITH: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

1. 1,000 tons.

2. It is not in the public interest to reveal the details of private business of individual companies.

3. (a) No; (b) no.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STEEL FOR MANUFACTURE OF NAILS
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MOTION FOR PAPERS

PC

George Black

Progressive Conservative

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

For a return showing any request, recommendation, advice or suggestion from the controller or commissioner of Yukon to the minister, deputy minister or any official of the Department of Mines and Resources that section 78 of the Yukon Quartz Mining Act be enforced.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   YUKON QUARTZ MINING ACT
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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. MacICINNON:

I have had several conversations with the hon. member for Yukon regarding this motion, which has been allowed to stand during his temporary absence from the house. If there are any such communications they would be privileged, and I could not agree to have them brought down.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   YUKON QUARTZ MINING ACT
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Dropped.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MOTION FOR PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   YUKON QUARTZ MINING ACT
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NATIONAL CAPITAL

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That whereas the requirements of a national capital involve, from time to time, developments of a character beyond the municipal improvements ordinarily required in other cities;

And whereas the development of a national capital is at least in part a national responsibility;

And whereas the capital of Canada is designated by the British North America Act to be Ottawa;

And whereas the carrying out of planned improvements requires a clear expression of intention to proceed with necessary developments in a manner which will ensure continuity; Therefore this house is of opinion:

1. That it is desirable that all developments of the capital should be in accordance 'with an approved plan which has regard to the position of the city of Ottawa as a national capital in the present, and to its probable needs as the capital of Canada in years to come.

2. That a special account in the consolidated revenue fund, to be known as the national capital fund, should be created to which appropriation may be made annually by parliament over a period of years of the amounts required from time to time to meet the costs of such projects as may lie recommended by the federal district commission and approved by the governor in

Development of National Capital

council for the development of the national capital and the surrounding area, in accordance with the plan;

3. That it is desirable that the work necessary to this end be under the supervision of the federal district commission, distinct from its ordinary operations;

4. That the expenditure of moneys for these purposes should be conditional on the effective co-operation of the city of Ottawa and other municipalities within the national capital district.

He said: I know hon. members are anxious that the session should be concluded with as little delay as possible; therefore I promise I shall not take up much time with this resolution. I believe the resolution in the form in which it appears on the order paper will commend itself to hon. members without extended discussion. Most of the objectives set forth have been approved in past years, and the general conception I believe has met with acceptance not only in parliament but throughout the country.

As hon. members know, there are items in t'be estimates in relation to the work of the federal district commission. For that reason I shall not in my present remarks go into detail about specific projects. Questions on that particular phase of the matter may be asked when we reach those estimates.

The resolution, in a word, seeks to ensure the continuous development of Ottawa and surrounding areas in a manner which will help to meet its needs as the capital of Canada both at the present time and in years to come. I would link together, as setting forth the essentials of the resolution, certain clauses which appear in it. For this purpose I shall quote from the resolution, but in an order different from that in which these clauses appear.

The resolution states:

That it is desirable that all developments of the capital should be in accordance with an approved plan which has regard to the position of the city of Ottawa as a national capital in the present, and to its probable needs as the capital of Canada in years to come.

The requirements of a national capital involve from time to time developments of a character beyond the municipal improvements ordinarily required in other cities.

The carrying out of planned improvements requires a clear expression of intention to proceed with necessary developments in a manner which will ensure continuity.

A special account in the consolidated revenue fund, to be knowm as the national capital fund, should be created, to which appropriation may be made annually by parliament over a period of years of the amounts required from time to time to meet the costs of such projects as may be recommended by the federal district commission and approved by the governor in council

for the development of the national capital and the surrounding area, in accordance with the plan.

I believe those four paragraphs, which I have rearranged in this order, will give to hon. members the essentials of the resolution.

May I now for a moment enlarge upon the statements therein set forth. It is 6tated first that-

It is desirable that all developments of the capital should be in accordance with an approved plan which has regard to the position of the city of Ottawa as a national capital in the present, and to its probable needs as the capital of Canada in years to come.

What was known as the Ottawa improvement commission was appointed during the administration of Sir Wilfrid Laurier within one year of fifty" years ago in order, as a federal government responsibility, to assist in, making in this city such necessary improvements as at that time seemed advisable, having regard to the fact that Ottawa was the capital of Canada. Those improvements have continued over the years, and hon. members now know the effect they have had upon Ottawa as the capital city of our country.

I need not go into details as to what has been accomplished over those years; the vast improvements, so apparent on all sides, speak for themselves. I would ask hon. members, however, to ask themselves what would have been the position in this capital today if those improvements had not been made during the last fifty years. It is in this light that I now present to the house this resolution, one which I hope will lead to essential developments which the city of Ottawa could not be expected to undertake as a municipal obligation, if the capital is to meet the needs which will be expected of it in the course of another fifty years, to say nothing of the years which will follow thereafter.

Unless these essential developments are made at the present time they will be extremely costly to make within another few years, if indeed it might not become next to impossible to make them later on. It is to anticipate a situation of that kind that I am bringing forward this resolution today.

As hon. members are aware, for some years past members of the federal district commission and others who are members of the capital planning committee, including several experts, have been working on a plan for the development of the capital. A master plan is being prepared setting out on broad lines the developments which should be followed from

59:4

Development oj National Capital

year to year by the different authorities and organizations having to do with the development of the capital. Here may I 'point, out that the municipality of Ottawa has its obliga-gations; the provinces of Ontario and Quebec each have also to do with matters which pertain to Ottawa and Hull and which affect the development of the capital. .Adjoining municipalities have to be brought into consideration in connection with developments affecting their areas. Finally in association with these authorities there are developments which the government itself, which has a special responsibility for the development of the national capital, will wish to make.

These several bodies cannot be brought together in harmonious relationship unless *there is some broad and general plan to be followed. For that reason, for some years past the government, as I haive said, has had experts at work under the direction of the federal district commission, preparing a master plan; in that work it has had the benefit of the best advice obtainable.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL CAPITAL
Sub-subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT UNDER APPROVED PLAN-PROVISION FOR ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. FLEMING:

Will the Prime Minister *permit a question?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL CAPITAL
Sub-subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT UNDER APPROVED PLAN-PROVISION FOR ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Well, if my hon. friend wishes to ask it now-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL CAPITAL
Sub-subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT UNDER APPROVED PLAN-PROVISION FOR ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. FLEMING:

WTould he elucidate the meaning of the expression "approved plan" in the first paragraph of the resolution? Does that refer to a plan which has been approved by the government, or one which has yet to be approved and which can be submitted to parliament for approval?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL CAPITAL
Sub-subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT UNDER APPROVED PLAN-PROVISION FOR ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May I ask that I be permitted to continue my general statement? If there are details which I have not covered, they might be brought up for discussion on the estimates relating to the commission. At that time I would be happy so far as possible to answer any questions which may be asked.

The question the hon. member has just asked respecting an approved plan is one which I was about immediately to anticipate. I do not think the words "approved plan" should be taken as meaning that any plan prepared at the moment is to be followed in all details over the next twenty, forty, fifty or a hundred years or that any plan should be approved as a whole by the government or by parliament; but rather that developments should be made in stages in accordance with general ideas which seem to meet with general acceptance and which are in the nature of guides to the future.

A tentative plan is in the making, but it is not completed. As prepared, it deals with general features of the development of the city, including, for example, the main thoroughfares which should be developed; what should be done with railway tracks which intersect different parts of the city; where certain public buildings may be best located, and the like. That plan has already reached the stage which I believe would enable anyone looking at it to see exactly the lines of contemplated future developments. As agreement is reached among the different agencies or governments affected, it would be possible to have developments arranged upon those lines. I do not think however that too much significance should be attached to the word "approved" before the word "plan," as related to the plan as a whole, or as 'to finality in its details. This is true particularly in view of the fact that no further stage in the development planned on a large scale can take place without parliament approving in the first instance the essential projects being proposed.

The conception of following a master plan is I think imperative if development is to take place in an orderly way, and in a manner which will admit of projects once begun being carried out with a degree of certainty from year to year, different stages, as I have said, being approved by parliament from year to year as the years go by.

I attach great importance to the following statement:

The requirements of a national capital involve, from time to time, developments of a character beyond the municipal improvements ordinarily required in other cities.

That is why the government is asking today that this House of Commons declare its readiness to support the progress toward completion of certain developments which, once approved by parliament, may in the very nature of things not be possible of completion all at once and which may require appropriations from time to time over a series of years. Already the city of Ottawa, the government of Ontario, the government of Quebec, some of the municipalities adjoining Ottawa, and the federal district commission, have been in communication with each other with respect to certain developments which they all feel to be more or less essential and which they would like to see commenced at once. These are developments that could not be expected from the municipality itself; they are developments that might not be made if Ottawa were not the capital of our country and there were not necessarily regard for the future development of the country as well as of the municipality.

Development oj National Capital

These various authorities wish to have some assurance that if a certain development is undertaken it will be proceeded with, that it will not be started this year by an appropriation by parliament of a certain amount and then dropped in the year following. They are asking that this parliament indicate, first, its belief in following a plan, and, second, its intention to see that essential developments under that plan are presented to parliament from time to time and developed along lines which may continue to receive the approval of parliament.

Perhaps 1 could not do better at the moment than to anticipate what might be asked with respect to the immediate developments the federal district commission have in mind and that the government is recommending in connection with an item that appears in the supplementary estimates at this time. Before giving that in detail it might help to disclose the importance of the proposed developments were I to say a word about the appearance of this capital as I recall it before some of the major developments in the capital, because of its being the capital, were made at the instance of the government.

We hear a great deal of complaint about traffic congestion and confusion in the centre of the city, between the houses of parliament, the Chateau Laurier and the station, and particularly around the national war memorial. I remember well what the city was like before the changes were made that have since produced such a splendid effect.

When a Liberal administration came into office in the early twenties the spape now occupied by the national war memorial and the open spaces immediately adjoining were occupied by a block of buildings, including a hotel; by a second hotel, a post office, a theatre, a city hall and a church-all in that limited space. In the space which the national war memorial now occupies there was a mass of buildings between Elgin street and a point close to the approaches to the Chateau Laurier, and again between Wellington and Sparks streets. There was one side of a hotel on the corner opposite the Langevin block; there were other shops and stores that ran on down Elgin street from Wellington to Sparks street; there was a series of shops and stores along Sparks street; on Wellington street, there were offices and shops and another side of the hotel. Behind that block was the Ottawa post office, which occupied a considerable space. Today it is located on the corner of Elgin and Sparks street.

On the far side of Sparks street opposite this commercial block was the largest hotel in the city, the Russell hotel, with shops and stores adjoining. Behind and adjoining the Russell hotel was a large theatre. Beyond the Russell hotel and the theatre was the city hall and Knox church. Along Elgin street there was a row of dwellings which, had they not been removed, would now be standing on the east side, making that street half the width it is at the present time.

All the improvements I have mentioned have been made within the last fifteen or twenty years, and in accordance with a plan agreed to by the government and the municipality, each sharing in the cost. They have changed entirely the appearance of the city and have given some breathing space in this central part of the capital.

Congestion due to the growth of the city and from other causes is again taking place in this area. Traffic of larger proportions and of a different kind is now being found on the streets in the very heart of the city. Twenty years ago we had not the enormous trucks and vans which are now making use of any thoroughfare they find most convenient. They are making their presence all too greatly felt in this area, an area in which they would scarcely have been able to operate had it not undergone so much in the way of improvement. The commission, the city authorities and others have come to 'the conclusion that a major development is necessary if this congestion is to be relieved. The traffic of heavier vehicles must be directed away from in front of the parliament, buildings and the centre of the city to some other portion.

It is proposed that a bridge should be thrown across the canal south of the station to run from Elgin street to Waller street. It would cross at a point half way between Sparks street, where the monument is situated, and the Laurier avenue bridge. Last year the house approved appropriations which enabled soundings and other investigations to be made respecting the feasibility of constructing a bridge there. The reports are favourable, and the commission is asking, in the appropriation which parliament will be requested to vote later, for money to enable it to proceed with the immediate construction of that bridge. It may take considerable time to complete, but when completed it will have the effect of removing heavy truck and other traffic from this part of the city to another more suitable part.

Development of National Capital

Another major improvement that is desired is in relation to the location of railroad tracks and freight terminals. I ask hon. members to contemplate what the situation will be like twenty or fifty years hence if the freight terminals which are now located where they are in this capital are allowed to remain without any anticipation of the growth of traffic, on the one hand, and the growth of the city and its needs, to say nothing of the country, on the other. Within a quarter mile of these houses of parliament one can see, from the very windows of this building, freight terminals in the immediate vicinity of the Union station. Going toward government house in the near vicinity of the research council building and Earnscliffe one can see on the other side of the street, facing the Ottawa river, freight terminals which are occupying space which should be reserved for public buildings of first importance to the country.

The commission and the city both feel that some arrangements should be made with the railroad companies to have these freight terminals placed in another part of the city. That will not be accomplished in a day, and it will not be accomplished by any one authority. It can only be brought about by the co-operation of the different interests concerned, but a beginning is necessary if the change is ever to be made. What the government has already done to anticipate that end has been to ask parliament to approve first the expenditure of a certain amount of money for the acquisition of lands in those parts of the city which appear likely, in accordance with the general plan, to provide suitable locations, and to appropriate money for the approaches in order that the terminals may be placed in parts that would be appropriate. In other words, what the commission has had in mind is providing zoning areas, which will have regard to what should be reserved for governmental purposes, for commercial purposes, and for residential purposes, and to enter on this task at once while there is opportunity, to have these needs planned and that without too much in the way of expense.

The commission have asked that they should have the right to take up with the railway companies some of the major changes to which I have referred. I have had conversations with the president and chairman of the Canadian Pacific Railway and with the president of the Canadian National Railways, and these gentlemen have expressed their entire sympathy with the development of

the capital of Canada in accordance with a general plan. They would wish however to have considered very carefully any change that would have to be made and the time at which it is to be made. They recognize that some changes will be necessary in the course of time, and they are prepared to co-operate with the commission in seeking to work out a plan which will permit of that development in the most satisfactory way.

I should like to mention one or two other contemplated developments, but that would take up time that cannot be spared at the moment. What I have sought to do today is to make clear to the house the main purpose of the resolution: first, to have it known as the desire of the house that in necessary developments in the capital we should follow a plan; and second, to have the assurance from parliament that when these developments are begun the authorities may have reason to feel that they will be continued in accordance with provision made by parliament from year to year in such amounts as it may deem appropriate. Here let me again make clear that there is no likelihood of a major development taking place which will not be fully under the control of parliament. In the first instance recommendations will be made by the federal district commission in accordance with the advice of their experts and after consultation with the other interests affected. The projects recommended will then have to be approved, first, by order in council of the government so that great care may be taken at that stage, and in the second place by the appropriation of the necessary moneys for these projects by parliament. Lastly, appropriations will be made from year to year, so that parliament may have very full control where federal expenditures are involved.

Another way to have proceeded might have been to ask parliament to vote a large amount of money as was done in the case of the development of Washington, the development of Paris, and other cities, so that the commission, with that guarantee, could have looked forward to a series of developments being effected without interruption over the years. The government felt, however, it rvould be preferable, while having an assurance from parliament of its intention to have the developments proceeded with continuously, to reserve to parliament the control which it would have from year to year of the necessary outlays for all these developments.

I should like to emphasize to hon. members how the whole position of the capital has altered within very recent years. I remember when I first came into office there was not a foreign mission in this country, nor did we

Development oj National Capital

have a single mission representing Canada in a foreign country. We had no representatives in Canada from any of the other dominions, nor from the United Kingdom. We had one representative of our own in the person of the high commissioner in London, and we had a representative of Canada in Paris, but apart from those two representatives of the government there were no representatives here from the governments of the United Kingdom or the other dominions and none from the heads of foreign states. There were no legations and no embassies. There are now something like twenty-five different missions established right here in this capital. The representatives of various countries require accommodation in the city, and more will be coming.

Further may I point out how the capital has increasingly become the centre for important conventions, of conferences, dominion conferences, commonwealth conferences, international conferences, and the like. We have had one visit to our capital from Their Majesties the King and Queen. I think we may look forward to the day when the king and queen will reside for part of the year in the capital of Canada. I am saying nothing at the moment about such matters as tourist traffic, and the importance to Canada of what has been done by its capital to attract visitors to our country. As all hon. members know, the capital of a country is a centre of attraction, and we must look forward to the development of Ottawa in the light of that larger vision. Moreover, the public buildings and public thoroughfares of a capital should lend inspiration to its position as a centre of the culture of the nation, its arts, letters, science and government. Countries are more or less known by their capitals.

When one speaks of other countries, of France, for instance, one thinks of Paris and how beautifully it is laid out; when we speak of Italy, we think of Rome; when we speak of the United Kingdom, we think of London; when we speak of the United States, we think of Washington; indeed, when we think of Greece and Italy, even as they were in ancient times, we are still able to see how Athens and Rome were planned centuries ago.

I believe, as I think all hon. members of this house believe, that Canada may have a future greater than that of almost any of the countries I have mentioned. The day will come, I believe, when this dominion will hold first place among the nations of the British commonwealth. The United Kingdom will always be its spiritual centre, if you wish to use that expression, but even today this Dominion of Canada is the most fortunate country in the world. It has possibilities of development which no other country begins to possess. The proposal which the government is bringing

forward today in the form of a resolution has been framed with a view to helping to meet the needs of Canada's capital in the present. It also, and even more, seeks to anticipate the needs of Canada's capital in the future as we believe that future will shape our country. We desire a capital adequate at all times to the country's needs. We desire, above all else, a capital worthy of the high place that Canada holds in the world today and of the Canada that is yet to be.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL CAPITAL
Sub-subtopic:   DEVELOPMENT UNDER APPROVED PLAN-PROVISION FOR ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS
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June 28, 1948