March 24, 1948

VETERANS AFFAIRS


Second report of special committee on veterans affairs.-Mr. Tucker.


EQUALIZATION PAYMENT ON GRAIN MARKETED FROM AUGUST 1, 1946, TO JULY 31, 1947

LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I desire to announce that an equalization payment of 3-623 cents per bushel will be made to western producers who marketed oats in the period from August 1, 1946, to July 31, 1947. The total payment will amount to $3,762,031.39 and will be made on 103,837,466 bushels. During the entire crop year an amount of $10,971,544.46 was collected in equalization fees. It will be remembered that an advance equalization payment of 10 cents per bushel, amounting to $7,227,341.55, was made on oats deliveries from August 1, 1946, to March 17, 1947, when the maximum price was increased and no further advance equalization payments made. As soon as the cheques can be written they will be sent to the handling companies, who will distribute them to the producers.

Topic:   EQUALIZATION PAYMENT ON GRAIN MARKETED FROM AUGUST 1, 1946, TO JULY 31, 1947
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PC

Arthur Leroy Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SMITH (Calgary West):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Minister of Trade and Commerce a question, because I did not hear precisely what he said with respect to oats and barley. I have tried- to get a copy of his statement, but it has gone to Hansard and so I must ask for the information. The minister spoke of three cents odd on oats. Do I understand that that is to come from the equalization fund or from funds to be voted by the parliament of Canada? The equalization fund, as I understand it, arises from permits granted on oats and barley.

Topic:   EQUALIZATION PAYMENT ON GRAIN MARKETED FROM AUGUST 1, 1946, TO JULY 31, 1947
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The money comes from the equalization fund. Hon. members will recall that at the beginning of the crop year 1946-47 an equalization fee of ten cents was paid on all purchases. Later in the year the price was adjusted, and accordingly that equalization fee was dropped. But there remained an equalization fund equivalent to some three and a half cents a bushel applying to the total deliveries of the crop. It is that sum that is being paid out at this time.

Topic:   EQUALIZATION PAYMENT ON GRAIN MARKETED FROM AUGUST 1, 1946, TO JULY 31, 1947
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NATIONAL DEFENCE

STATEMENT ON STRENGTH AND RECRUITING OF ARMED FORCES

LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. BROOKE CLAXTON (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, in view of its importance in the national interest I feel that hon. members will wish me to make a statement on the strength and recruiting for the active (or permanent) and reserve forces.

The authorized strength of the three services of the active forces is 42,145 officers and men. At the end of February the strength was 34,276, which is more than three times as large as at the outbreak of war in 1939. This number represents 80 per cent of the strength at present authorized. It is interesting to note that the proportion of regulars on strength compared with the target for March 31, 1949, is the same in Canada as in the United Kingdom. Unlike other countries which still have men who were enlisted for the duration of hostilities or who were called up for a limited period, all Canadian forces are permanent or regular.

It may be pointed out that in Canada as in other countries there has been a tendency since the war to use civilians for work which was previously performed by service personnel but which is obviously of a civilian character. This includes cooks, mess orderlies, clerks, certain mechanics, firefighters and other occupations of a civilian character at permanent establishments. Other civilians are engaged at prevailing rates in the dockyards at Esquimalt and Halifax in constructing married quarters and in general maintenance work.

The present strength of the army reserve forces is 33,369, with 1,829 C.O.T.C., making a total of 35,198. In the naval reserve there are 2.112, with 1,033 in the university naval training division, making 3,145. The air force auxiliary with 722 men is beginning to set up squadrons as ground crews and planes become available.

The total figures for the navy and army reserves and air force auxiliary are about the same as they were up to the period immediately before the war. But now there are also more than a million men and women in Canada who have had military service in the second world war, including a higher proportion of trained air crew than m any other country.

255S

National Defence

Last September a campaign to obtain recruits was set under way across Canada and has since been continued. This campaign included distribution of information, radio and newspaper publicity, exhibitions and parades.

The recruiting campaign has shown good results. During the year 1947 there were 31,688 approaches for active service in the three forces, resulting in 9,240 enlistments. The largest cause of rejection was the high educational standard required for the three services.

The standard has been junior matriculation or its equivalent. This was considered desirable because of the highly technical nature of work in the forces, particularly as a major part of the role of the active forces is related to administration and training. The active forces will serve as a nucleus about which to build a very much larger force should the need arise.

The problem of educational standards is serious. It has been estimated that each year about 6,500 physically fit boys reach 17i, who have junior matriculation and who do not go on to senior matriculation or the universities. To fill up our ranks with boys of this standard would take virtually all the boys having these qualifications-even then, we would not have enough. As it has turned out, we have been getting a very fair proportion. But steps are now being taken to reduce or adjust the educational standards so as to broaden the field; at the same time we shall increase facilities for in-service general education so as to achieve by one means or the other the standards that are necessary.

As to the flow of recruits, this year up to the 15th March, we have obtained a total of 1,625 recruits, of which approximately half are for the army alone. The flow into the army is at the rate required to keep the recruit schools full and to complete the authorized establishment by the time planned. The flow into the navy and air force is less than we require.

Parents and young men should realize that joining our navy, army and air force gives an opportunity for (1) service to Canada; (2) a career with good rates of pay and conditions of service; (3) continuing education and developing trade and other skills; and (4) an excellent pension at a relatively early age.

I am convinced that young men will come forward to fill up the ranks of the active forces.

We also want all the men we can get for the reserve navy and army and the auxiliary air force. The reserve forces are a major part of Canada's defence forces. In the event of

an emergency the reserves would again constitute the framework for the organization of larger active forces. Reserve force training is service of real national importance which should appeal to all young Canadians who are physically fit and are willing to offer their services for part-time training.

Attention should also be called to the remarkable opportunities for training as officers offered in the Canadian service colleges at Royal Roads and R.M.C., Kingston. This year there will be a number of vacancies for boys having senior matriculation or its equivalent. Application should be made by the twenty-second of May. Pay received for summer training should cover the whole cost of education for the second and subsequent years. By this means and through the university officers training plans, it is believed that we will have a large force of highly qualified officers with standards never excelled in this or any other country.

There is no necessity of pointing out today that either from the short or the long term point of view, active and reserve forces of the character which I have described are needed so that we can be ready to meet any emergency and maintain the existence of our country and the freedom of our people, so that we shall continue to say what kind of life we want to lead.

I hope that this effort to fill up our ranks will have the support of all parties, of all veterans of the two wars, and of the country as a whole.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT ON STRENGTH AND RECRUITING OF ARMED FORCES
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PC

Alan Cockeram

Progressive Conservative

Mr. COCKERAM :

The Minister of National Defence in his statement said that a time limit had been planned for the recruiting campaign. When does that time limit expire?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT ON STRENGTH AND RECRUITING OF ARMED FORCES
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LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. CLAXTON:

I do not know what the hon. member has in mind because I did not make such a statement. With respect to recruitment for the army, the estimates are planned on the basis that it will be brought up to strength by March 31, 1949. I have not the dates for the navy and air force, but they are approximately the same.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   STATEMENT ON STRENGTH AND RECRUITING OF ARMED FORCES
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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 174, to incorporate The Canadian Association of Optometrists.-Mr. Winters. Bill No. 175. for the relief of Winifred Audrey Meyer Holton.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 176, for the relief of Chester Adam Hart.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 177, for the relief of Marie Marguerite Cecile Gagnon Lescadres.-Mr May-bank. House of Commons Bill No. 178, for the relief of Samuel Reinhardt Lewis. Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 179, for the relief of Ersilia Pace Imonti.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 180, for the relief of Helen Rose Noel Steele.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 181, for the relief of Edith Saltz-man Rashkovan.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 182, for the relief of Ida Malfara Romanelli.-Mr. Maybank.


SALARY INCREASES TO EMPLOYEES-ACTION FOLLOWING EASTER ADJOURNMENT

LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I should like to make a statement to the house. Before the Easter adjournment it is considered desirable to reassure the staff of the house that revisions in salary rates for those classes which have not already been revised are under consideration now by the commissioners of internal economy, and it is expected that a resolution will be introduced within a few days after the Easter adjournment implementing the decision now under consideration.

The revisions so made will be dated back to October 1 in the same way as those already made by the civil service commission.

Topic:   SALARY INCREASES TO EMPLOYEES-ACTION FOLLOWING EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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ARRANGEMENT WITH RESPECT TO EASTER ADJOURNMENT


On the order, "Government notices of motion": That when this house adjourns on Wednesday, March 24th instant, it stand adjourned until Tuesday the 30th instant.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, may I say just a word on this motion. I think the motion had better be held until we see what progress is made this afternoon. If by any chance the house should not have concluded its discussion at six o'clock I shall move before that time that the house be not adjourned at six. That may or may not receive the approval of the house, but I imagine most hon. members are anxious to conclude today the measures we have been discussing.

Hon. members will understand that where assent to bills is required, arrangements have to be made with the other chamber in advance, also with the deputy of the governor general for his presence in the other chamber at a definite time. For that reason, if we are to conclude today, some little time will be required after we have finished our proceedings, to complete the final arrangements for assent to bills in the other chamber. If we do not conclude today, the house will sit tomorrow in the regular way.

Topic:   ARRANGEMENT WITH RESPECT TO EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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?

Mr. M. J. COLD WELL@Rosetown-Biggar

May I say a word to the Prime Minister?- and I would not raise this question at the moment if it were not likely that this will be the last sitting before the Easter recess. In view of the reported vital change in Bill 135 by a committee of the other place, what does the government propose to do to ensure that we get this measure through before we adjourn for Easter? This is a most important matter to western Canada.

Topic:   ARRANGEMENT WITH RESPECT TO EASTER ADJOURNMENT
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March 24, 1948