March 10, 1948

PC
LIB

George James McIlraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. McILRAITH:

Employees in the Civil Service of Canada, only:

Temporary-(a) May 1, 1945, 83,971; *Janu-ary 1, 1946, 108,761; *January 1, 1947, 121,673; January 1, 1948 (unrevised), 92,373.

Permanent-(b) May 1, 1945, 30.477; Janu-uary 1, 1946, 31,038; January 1, 1947 , 30,060; January 1, 1948 (unrevised), 32,503.

These include extra employees in the Post Office department taken on for the Christmas rush.

2062

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   EMPLOYMENT IN PUBLIC SERVICE
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TRAINING OF CHINESE PILOTS

CCF

Thomas John Bentley

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. BENTLEY:

What department of government has jurisdiction over the training of Chinese pilots?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TRAINING OF CHINESE PILOTS
Permalink
LIB

George James McIlraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. McILRAITH:

Jurisdiction over the training of all civil pilots in Canada, irrespective of nationality, is exercised by the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply under the authority of the Aeronautics Act and regulations issued thereunder.

1. and 2.

Months

Canada ____

January . February March ...

April ___

May _____

June ____

July ....

August .. September October . November December

Months Canada .... January . February March ...

April ___

May _____

June ____

July ....

August .. September October . November December

Canada

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Note:-Breakdown for 1947, not compiled.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TRAINING OF CHINESE PILOTS
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BUILDING PERMITS

PC

Mr. FLEMING:

Progressive Conservative

1. What is the aggregate value of building permits issued in Canada, by months and by the year, in (a) 1945; (b) 1946; (e) 1947?

2. How much of such aggregate value in each of the said months and years was for (a) residential construction; (b) commercial and industrial construction ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUILDING PERMITS
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LIB

George James McIlraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. McILRAITH:

1945 Building Permits 1946 1917$ S S197,187,160 383,596,698 373,231,2495,394.227 15.287.048 15,609,4827,224,439 16,572,116 16,791,87912,782,715 39,758,925 24,312,90917,847,235 56,733,095 41,291,66917,860,383 47,858,839 44,412,41219,567,802 32,255,113 38.273,54619,942,269 34,543,217 39,173,61423,281,549 29,496,441 30,112,19820,038,759 29,049,710 36,541,66719,643,473 33,630,991 39,702.98918.283,671 24,286,370 26.541,51715,320,638 24,124,833 20,467,367Residential 1945 Commercial Industrial$ $ $117,888,831 23,094,399 31,891,7092,400,692 993,176 1,770,5353,449,565 969,925 2,480,2167,326,522 1,423,767 1,542,67610,893,368 1,723,672 2,541,92113,936,682 1,552.371 1,759,62213,157,758 1,693,459 1,711,65513,044,902 2,472,303 2,761,36611,529,218 2,529,504 3,687,43513,037,998 2,431,666 3,182,33612,646.947 2,257,140 3,076,1799,993,002 2,413,701 4,006,1486,472,177 2,633,715 3,371,620200,691,307 1946 100,265,381 54,761,6238.201,037 3,592,443 2,406,0788,058,996 3,234,332 4,924,46320,635.249 11,902,261 5,794,03331,286,048 15,763.909 5,672,62625,542,538 12,601.906 6,297,79819,744,398 7,286,158 3,879,70616,262,001 9,481,521 6.625,56717,780,770 6,249,189 3,219,55515,475,182 6,463.087 3,317.60916,548,331 7,923,864 5,629,91512,845,040 6,034,730 2,825,8268,311,717 9,731,981 4,168,447

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUILDING PERMITS
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INDIRECT TAXES-CLOTHING, ETC.

SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. LOW:

What is the total amount of indirect taxes collected by the federal government, at all levels of their production and sale to the ultimate purchaser, during 1947, of the following 'articles:

(a) men's hats in the $8-$l'0 retail class; (b) standard four-door Ford sedan equipped as it leaves the factory; (c) Canadian worsted men's made-to-measure suit in the $70' retail price class; (d) Can'adian-made men's shoes in the $8-$10 retail price class; (e) House of Lords cigars; (f) Player's cigarettes; (g) Laura Secord chocolate candy in the 90 cents a pound retail class ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INDIRECT TAXES-CLOTHING, ETC.
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LIB

Robert Henry Winters (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. WINTERS:

The department has no information as to the exact amount of taxes paid! on the articles referred to in the question because of the variation in prices of different manufacturers of the same lines, and the difference in value and quality of merchandise, etc.

The following information as to the application of the taxes on the various articles mentioned is, however, supplied:-

(a) Subject to sales tax only on the manufacturer's selling price to wholesalers or its equivalent;

(b) Prior to November 18, 1947, subject to a 10 per cent excise tax and an 8 per cent sales tax on the manufacturer's selling price. On and after November 18 subject to an excise tax as follows:-

At $1,200 or less, 25 per cent;

At more than $1,200 but not more than $2,000, 25 per cent on $1,200 plus 50 per cent, on the amount in excess of $1,200;

At more than $2,000, 25 per cent on $1,200 plus 50 per cent on $800, plus 75 per cent on the amount in excess of $2,000; and to a sales tax of 8 per cent on the manufacturer's selling price.

(c) Same as in (a).

(di) Same as in (a).

(e) Cigars are subject to an excise tax of 25 per cent and to a sales tax of 8 per cent on the manufacturer's selling price to wholesalers or its equivalent. Cigars are also subject to an excise duty of $1 per thousand.

(f) Cigarettes are subject to an excise tax of 2 cents for each five cigarettes or fraction of five cigarettes contained in any package, and to a sales tax of 8 per cent payable on the manufacturer's selling price to wholesalers or its equivalent. They are also subject to an excise duty of $6 per thousand.

(g) Chocolate candy of this type is subject to an excise tax of 30 per cent and to a sales tax of 8 per cent on fifty-one per cent of the retail selling price.

If any of the goods mentioned were imported, the sales tax and the ad valorem excise taxes would apply on the duty paid value. The specific excises would be as stated.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INDIRECT TAXES-CLOTHING, ETC.
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IMPROVEMENT OF NUTRITION

LIB

Aldéric Laurendeau

Liberal

Mr. LAURENDEAU:

What is being done by the Department of National Health and Welfare for the improvement of nutrition in Canada?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPROVEMENT OF NUTRITION
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LIB

Ralph Maybank (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Mr. MAYBANK:

Surveys have indicated that malnutrition is a condition not confined to any one particular part of the country or income group. It may be said that the three main causes of faulty nutrition are lack of money, lack of information and lack of interest. The Department of National Health and Welfare is taking active steps on all three fronts. The payment of family allowances makes possible the spending of a larger amount on adequate foods. Along with other agencies the department is active in combatting the lack of information on proper nutrition and in attempting to arouse interest in the subject.

The nutrition work of the department is greatly aided by the Canadian council on nutrition which meets twice yearly to plan future programs, ensure co-ordinated effort and eliminate possible duplication of services. The council is representative of provincial and private agencies and consists of scientists, home economists, doctors and others who give freely of their time to answer problems referred to them and also bring to the attention of the department any aspect of nutrition which they consider important and concerning which remedial action should be taken.

While several divisions of the Department of National Health and Welfare take part in efforts to improve the nutritional status of Canadians, the one most intimately connected with the problem is the nutrition division. Also co-operating in that field are such divisions as those relating to child and maternal health, dental health, civil service health, Indian health and family allowances.

The prime responsibility of the nutrition division on its formation in 1941 was to improve the health of war workers through encouraging improved nutrition both in the workers' homes and in connection with cafeterias and canteens operated by war contract plants. While the activities of the nutrition divisions were originally related mainly to the war effort, the end of hostilities has seen a continuation and broadening of its aims. In its objective to improve the health of Canadians through improved nutrition the department has sought and is receiving the active co-operation of provincial and private agencies.

Questions

For the past two years the nutrition division has conducted nutrition surveys, on request, in various parts of Canada; in particular in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Along with the surveys a special effort is made to discuss individual problems with the persons studied or, in the case of children, with their parents. The results show that in some sections one child in five has evidence of past rickets; in other sections one person in eight is definitely anaemic. There are evidences that nutritional levels are improving but improvement is achieved slowly. Much more needs to be done and, with the co-operation of various interested governmental and private agencies the work is proceeding.

All types of educational approaches are being used to assist Canadians in establishing good food habits. The nutrition division has prepared booklets, posters, films, filmstrips and teaching materials on various aspects of food and nutrition. Literature has been compiled on food budgeting, school lunches, the feeding of those in different age groups, the value and sources of particular foods and food elements, and on approved methods of cookery. A point of interest is that the nutrition division prepares the bulk of nutrition education material in use in Canada and distributes it free of charge, with most of it being channelled to and through the provincial governments. In the educational approach to nutrition problems the Canadian council on nutrition has played a very important guiding role.

Although inspection of food services in war industries stopped with the end of the war, many Canadian plants have continued to operate such services. Part of the work of the department consists of continuing to give advice on matters of food service to industries requesting it. Information and assistance in connection with group feeding is also sought by camps, hospitals and other institutions, and by other departments of the federal government. During the past year, in response to a request from the Indian health services, the nutrition division established a consultation and advisory service on food and nutrition in Indian residential schools across Canada. Many of these schools have been inspected by nutrition experts, and steps are being taken to improve the nutrition and health of our Indian population.

A result of the greater interest in food and nutrition problems has been an increasing number of inquiries received by the department on such subjects. In many cases such requests can be dealt with by forwarding litera-

ture on the particular topic. In other cases reference is made to the department's nutrition library in order to supply data on particular points. The information requested may vary from a very small item to a request for detailed plans for a provincial nutrition program or a request for assistance in planning a large scale food service and appropriate meals.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPROVEMENT OF NUTRITION
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FILM BOARD-OFFICES IN OTHER COUNTRIES

CCF

Mr. STEWART (Winnipeg North):

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What offices had ithe national film board in (a) the British commonwealth; (b) the United States; (e) other countries as of December 31, 1947?

2. How many persons were employed in each office and what were their classifications and salaries?

3. How many films were (a) sold; (b) rented; (e) exhibited free during the nine month period April 1, 1947 to December 31, 1947, in each of the areas mentioned in first question?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FILM BOARD-OFFICES IN OTHER COUNTRIES
Permalink
LIB

Mr. WINTERS: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FILM BOARD-OFFICES IN OTHER COUNTRIES
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HEALTH AND WELFARE-FOOD AND DRUGS DIVISION

LIB

Matthew MacLean

Liberal

Mr. MacLEAN:

What w^as the purpose of combining the food and drug division, the advertising and labels division, and the proprietary or patent medicine division as the directorate of food and dirug division in the Department of National Health and Welfare?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   HEALTH AND WELFARE-FOOD AND DRUGS DIVISION
Permalink
LIB

Ralph Maybank (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Mr. MAYBANK:

The food and drugs division, the proprietary or patent medicine division and the advertising and labels division of the department have been combined and organized as a directorate for the following reasons:

1. Administrative reasons:

A. The work of the food and drugs division and the advertising and labels division overlaps because-

(a) Both divisions were established to enforce provisions of the Food and Drugs Act. The Food and Drugs Act deals, among other

things, with adulteration and misbranding and false, misleading or exaggerated claims for foods or drugs. Its provisions cannot be completely and easily divided into two parts, one dealing solely with advertising and labels and the other with adulteration or health measures. The limits of the duties of the two divisions cannot, therefore, be clearly defined. Confusion from their activities can only be prevented through direction by a single authority.

(b) The Food and Drugs Act was designed, as evidenced by its wording and arrangement as well as its history, to be administered by one authority, the chief dominion analyst, who is mentioned in the act. The food and drugs division under the chief dominion analyst was organized for this purpose and has the necessary laboratory and inspection services. Punitive or corrective action in respect to improper labels and advertising can only be instituted in many cases after collection of an official sample by the inspection services and analyses by the laboratory. Much of the work on advertising and labels must, therefore, be carried out through the food and drugs division unless parallel services were to be established in the advertising and labels division. Such a situation could be a potential source of confusion and conflicting authority.

(c) The Food and Drugs Act necessarily places restrictions on trade. These restrictions must be uniformly enforced throughout the country, and those on advertising and label claims must be correlated with the composition of the products andi vice versa. Correlation and uniformity can be most efficiently obtained through one authority: i.e. by bringing the two divisions into one directorate.

(d) Much of the work of examining advertising and labels in a locality must be carried out by the inspectors and1 offices of the food and drugs division; another case of overlapping work.

B. The work of the proprietary or patent medicine division is closely related to the work of both the food and drugs division and the advertising and labels division.

(a) The Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act deals with secret formula remedies. These contain ingredients which are under the authority of the Food and Drugs Act. It is necessary that claims made for secret formula remedies, on the basis of these ingredients do not exceed or be essentially different from those made for the same substances under the Food and Drugs Act. This requires a careful and close correlation of the work of the proprietary or patent medicine division and the advertising and labels division.

Questions

(b)1 The analysis of patent medicines is carried out in the laboratories of the food and drug division. The collection of samples of patent medicines for official examination is made by inspectors of the food and drugs division. These activities require correlation of the proprietary or patent medicine division and the food and drugs division.

2. Reasons of economy:

(a) 1 Since both proprietary or patent medicine division and advertising and labels division require inspection and laboratory services and these already exist in the food and drugs division, the use of the existing services for all three divisions make for economy and efficiency.

(b) Economies can also be effected in clerical staffs.

(c) The inspection services of the food and drugs division require the supervision of a senior administrative officer and this function has been given to the chief of advertising and labels.

3. Reasons of enforcement:

It is highly desirable that the trade and public have one closely knit group to deal with in the matter of food and drug laws and enforcement rather than three separate independently acting divisions.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   HEALTH AND WELFARE-FOOD AND DRUGS DIVISION
Permalink

March 10, 1948