March 10, 1948

LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. CHEVRIER:

The Canadian National Railways advise as follows:

1. Pensions paid solely at the expense of the railway consist of either a basic pension of $25 or a service pension in excess of $25. The number of employees who receive only a basic

or service pension is:

Less than $25 per month 60 (old plan)

$25 per month 2,584

$25.01 to $29.99 per month ... 875$30.00 to $39.99 per month ... 667$40.00 to $49.99 per month ... 365$50.00 to $59.99 per month ... 225$60 or over per month 574

5,350

2. The number of pensions paid partly at the expense of the railway and partly arising from employee contributions is:

$25.01 to $29.99 per month

470$30.00 to $39.99 per month

1,994$40.00 to $49.99 per month

1,305$50.00 to $59.99 per month

873$60 or over per month

3,509

8,151

3. See answer to No. 2.

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS-PENSIONS
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FOREIGN EXCHANGE-U.S. DOLLAR CONTENT IN EXPORTS AS MUTUAL AID, ETC.

PC

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

Progressive Conservative

1. What is the value of the U.S. dollar content in the products exported from Canada by way of mutual aid, gifts or loans to the U.K. and European countries, up to December 31, 1947?

2. What .amount of U.S. dollars has been recovered from the above exports up to December 31, 1947?

3. Does the government propose to continue exports to countries on a mutual aid, gift or loan basis, of products with U.S. dollar content, and for how long, and without receiving payment covering U.S. dollar content?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE-U.S. DOLLAR CONTENT IN EXPORTS AS MUTUAL AID, ETC.
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LIB

Mr. MAYHEW: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

1. It is impossible at this time to determine the United States dollar content in the products exported from Canada by way of mutual aid, gifts, or loans to the U.K. and European countries during the last few years.

2. It is not entirely clear what is meant by the query as to the amount of U.S. dollars recovered from these exports. It is true, however, that very substantial iamounts of gold and U.S. dollars have been received from the countries referred to during the period mentioned.

In the case of the United Kingdom, total receipts of gold and U.S. dollars for the years 1942 to 1947 were as follows:

Equivalent in

Canadian

dollars

Year (millions)

1942 23

1943 143

1944 55

1945 33

1946 150

1947 505

All countries to which we have granted rredits under the Export Credits Insurance Act are, with one exception, required to pay for a portion of their purchases in Canada by the use of gold or U.S. dollars. Particulars are included in the various annual reports made to parliament under Part II of the act.

Receipts of U.S. dollars and convertible exchange from the European countries to which we have extended such export credits are estimated as follows:

Equivalent in Canadian dollars

Year (millions)

1945 70-4

1946 44-2

1-947 (Preliminary) 86-5-

3. No assistance by way of mutual aid, gift, or loan can be given to any country except under authority of parliament. There is now no legislation authorizing the granting of aid

to any country in respect of relief other than the appropriation of $20 million for post-UNRRA relief, and the appropriations for the Canadian contribution to certain United Nations organizations.

Of the loan to Britain, there remains available to be drawn only $246-5 million and, as has already been announced, present arrangements provide for using this credit in the amount of $45 million during 1948, this amount to be drawn during the first quarter.

In respect of the export credits to the other European countries, there remains unused $103 million. In the case of several borrowing countries which have substantial amounts of credit still available, arrangements were made during the latter part of 1947 that at least as much of their purchases in Canada would be paid for in gold or U.S. dollars as would be purchased out of the credits. Some commodities or classes of commodities.will only be sold for export for U.S. dollars or their equivalent.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE-U.S. DOLLAR CONTENT IN EXPORTS AS MUTUAL AID, ETC.
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ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY

PC

Mr. FULTON:

Progressive Conservative

1. What is (a) the authorized strength of the Royal Canadian Navy (active)? Have there been any regulations or orders changing this strength and if so. what is the effect of the change? (b) What is the present actual strength of all ranks now in the Royal Canadian Navy (active) ?

2. What is the distribution, by divisions, of the personnel presently on strength?

3. Of the personnel in each division as shown, how many are (a) effective fighting forces; (b) administrative, service and desk personnel (by divisions) ?

4. (a) What is the present authorized strength, in officers and other ranks respectively, on ships in commission (give names) of the R.C.N.? (b) What is the present number actually on strength on the ships in commission?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY
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LIB

Hugues Lapointe (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Parts 1 and 2 answered; parts 3 and 4 dropped.

1. (a) 10,375-subject to the total actual strength not exceeding 7,875 for the present.

(b) 6,782.

2. Halifax, 3,523; Headquarters, Ottawa, 178; Esquimalt, 3,081.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY
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ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE (ACTIVE)

PC

Mr. FULTON:

Progressive Conservative

1. What is (-a) the authorized strength of the Royal Canadian Air Force (active)? Have there been any regulations or orders changing this strength and if so, what is the effect of the change? (b) What is the present actual strength of all ranks now in the Royal Canadian Air Force (active)?

2. AVhat is the distribution, by commands, of the personnel presently on strength?

3. Of the personnel in each command as shown, how many are (a) effective fighting forces; (b) administrative, service and desk personnel (by commands) ?

Questions

4. (a) What is the present authorized strength, in officers and other ranks respectively (giving squadrons, units, etc., by name or number), of the "field" force of the R.C.A.F.?

(b) What is the present number actually on strength in the squadrons, units, etc., as above?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE (ACTIVE)
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LIB

Hugues Lapointe (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Parts 1 and 2 answered; parts 3 and 4 dropped,

1. (a) 18,221-subject to the total actual strength not exceeding 14,191 for the present.

(b) 11,636.

2.

Air Force Headquarters 552

Central Air Command 4,920

North West Air Command 2,735

Maintenance Command 1,691

Transport Group 1,614

Serving Outside Canada 124

Total 11,636

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE (ACTIVE)
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ROYAL, CANADIAN AIR FORCE-AUXILIARY

PC

Mr. FULTON:

Progressive Conservative

1. (a) What is the strength presently authorized of the auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Air Force? Have there been any amendments or regulations changing this and if so, what is the effect of such amendments? (b) What is the present actual strength of the auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Air Force?

2. What is the composition of the auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Air Force by squadrons?

3. Into what formations are these squadrons organized, giving names?

4. What is the authorized strength of each unit or part unit as above?

5. What is the actual number presently on strength of each unit or part unit as above?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL, CANADIAN AIR FORCE-AUXILIARY
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LIB

Hugues Lapointe (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Parts 1, 2 and 3 answered; parts 4 and 5 dropped.

1. (a) 4,500-subject to the total actual strength not exceeding 3,121 for the present.

(b) 692.

2. 10 squadrons.

3. 401 (F) squadron; 438 (F) squadron; 400 (F) squadron; 411 (F) squadron; 424 (F) squadron; 420 (F) squadron; 402 (F) squadron; 406 (TB) squadron; 418 (TB) squadron; 442 (F) squadron.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL, CANADIAN AIR FORCE-AUXILIARY
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ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY-RESERVE

PC

Mr. FULTON:

Progressive Conservative

1. (a) What is the strength presently authorized of the reserve of the Royal Canadian Navy? Have there been any amendments or regulations changing this and if so, what is the effect of such amendments? (b) What is the present actual strength of the reserve of the Royal Canadian Navy?

2. What is the composition of the reserve of the Royal Canadian Navy by units?

3. Into what formations are these units organized, giving names?

4. What is the authorized strength of each unit or part unit, as above?

5. What is the actual number presently on strength of each unit or part unit as above?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY-RESERVE
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LIB

Hugues Lapointe (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Parts 1, 2 and 3 answered; parts 4 and 5 dropped.

1. (a) 18,000-subject to the total actual strength not exceeding 4,400 for the present.

(b) 3,247.

2. Officers, Royal Canadian Navy (Reserve) Active List. Officers, Royal Canadian Navy (Reserve) Retired List.

Ratings, Royal Canadian Navy (Reserve) Active List. Ratings, Royal Canadian Navy (Reserve) Emergency.

3. H.M.C.S. Scotian; H.M.C.S. Queen Charlotte; H.M.C.S. Brunswicker; H.M.C.S. Montcalm; H.M.C.S. Donnacona; H.M.C.S. Carleton; H.M.C.S. Cataraqui; H.M.C.S. York; H.M.C.S. Star; H.M.C.S. Prevost; H.M.C.S. Hunter; H.M.C.S. Griffon; H.M.C.S. Chippawa; H.M.C.S. Unicorn; H.M.C.S. Queen; H.M.C.S. Nonsuch H.M.C.S. Tecum-seh; H.M.C.S. Discovery; H.M.C.S. Chatham; H.M.C.S. Malahat.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY-RESERVE
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AGRICULTURAL PRICES SUPPORT BOARD

CCF

Mr. WRIGHT:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Who are the members of the agricultural prices support board?

2. Do members of the board hold other government positions?

3. If so, what are they?

4. Has the board made iany written reports to the government other than, the annual report required by the Agricultural Prices Support Act?

5. If so, .are these reports available to members of parliament?

6. Have any commodity boards been set up under section 9, subsection (i) of the Agricultural Braces Support Act?

7. If so, what are the names of members of such board?

8. Have any .advisory committees been set up under section 9, subsection (j)?

9. If so, what are the names of members of such advisory committees?

10. How many meetings of advisory committees have been held to date?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURAL PRICES SUPPORT BOARD
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LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Mr. J. G. Taggart; Mr. Erie Kitchen; Mr. J. A. Proulx.

2. Yes.

3. Mr. J. G. Taggart is director-in-chief, agricultural services, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.

Mr. J. A. Proulx is chief officer for the Canadian farm loan board in the province of Quebec.

4. The board reports to the minister.

5. No.

6. No commodity boards have been set up under the authority of the agricultural prices

Questions

support board. Commodity boards originally set up under the authority of the War Measures Act and continued under the National Emergency Transitional Powers Act, 1945, and the Agricultural Products Act are available to act as agents for the agricultural prices support board.

7. See answer to 6.

8. Yes.

9. H. H. Hannam, president, Canadian Federation of Agriculture, Ottawa-chairman.

J. B. Munro, deputy minister of agriculture for B.C., Victoria, B.C.

E. J. Chambers, president, Associated Growers of British Columbia, Vernon, B.C.

0. S. Longman, deputy minister of agriculture for Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.

L. E. Pharris, director of the A.F.U. and A.F.A., Magrath, Alberta.

M. E. Hartnett, deputy minister of agriculture for Saskatchewan, Regina, Sask.

George Wright, president of U.F.C., and president of Sask. Federation of Agriculture, Borden, Sask.

W. J. Parker, president, Manitoba Pool Elevators Ltd., Winnipeg, Man.

F. W. Downing, manager, Canadian Live Stock Co-operative (Western) Limited, St. Boniface, Man.

C. D. Graham, deputy minister of agriculture for Ontario, Toronto, Ont.

B. B. Warnica, vice-president, Ontario Beef Cattle Producers Association, Barrie, Ont.

J. A. Marion, president, Quebec Chamber of Agriculture, Montreal, P.Q.

Henri Dubord, department of agriculture, Quebec, P.Q.

J. K. King, deputy minister of agriculture for N.B., Fredericton, N.B.

Harry Crandlemire, director of N.B. Potato Growers' Council, Gordonsville, N.B.

F. W. Walsh, deputy minister of agriculture for NJ3., Halifax, N.S.

W. R. Shaw, deputy minister of agriculture for P.E.I., Charlottetown, P.E.I.

10. Two meetings: April 15-17, 1947, and October 29-31, 1947.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURAL PRICES SUPPORT BOARD
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FLAG ADOPTED BY QUEBEC LEGISLATURE

March 10, 1948