March 2, 1948

PC

Wilfrid Garfield Case

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CASE:

I do not know who gave it to the newspapers. During my first trip out west I got off at a place called Springwater in Saskatchewan and heard a hee-haw in the distance and thought the most amusing thing in the world was to hear a jackass bray.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. CRUICKSHANK:

And you have been braying ever since.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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PC

Wilfrid Garfield Case

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CASE:

Military training has a greater objective in view than training a man to kill someone else. It trains a man how to defend himself.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

Fernand Viau

Liberal

Mr. VIAU:

Wear a uniform and you will understand it.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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PC

Wilfrid Garfield Case

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CASE:

I have worn one, and I tried for the second time too, and can produce evidence to prove it. I do not want to detract in the slightest from the effort my hon. friend has made, nor do I want to praise the effort I have made because I am none too proud of it myself. But military training is training our young people, our boys and our girls as well, in the art of self-defence; and with a proper approach and educational program the mothers of this land will approve it. As we scan the world's horizon today, we must appreciate that our very existence may some day depend upon the training that our people have had. Canadians are just as brave as any people on earth, but like most of the democracies we are not warlike. We are fond of peace and we thrive on peace; it is very difficult to talk of war in times of peace, and that is why we are usually caught napping. I was brought up as a boy on the farm, and what I feared most in the first world war was going up against soldiers fully trained in the art of war. Training gives a man confidence in being able to defend himself, and in the two great wars Canadians-I say this with a great sense of humbleness and at the same time with a deep sense of pride-have written lines that will never fade from the brightest pages of Canadian history. By their sacrifices and their love of freedom, their regard for their homes and their lovedl ones, they have guaranteed the security which we enjoy today.

There is something which I think might be done. I have a great admiration for General Crerar. He visited my home city, but unfortunately I was not present at the time. He has won great respect for his military knowledge. Canada has never had a full-fledged field marshal. I think of Field Marshal Smuts. I do not know why we do not shake off our infant clothes and make General Crerar a full-fledged field marshal, to give some sense of direction as head of the Canadian Army, and be able to associate on equal terms with other military officers of the highest rank abroad. We pride ourselves on being a nation. We do not want to glorify war, but I think our people would appreciate this honour being given to a great Canadian soldier.

What is the situation in Europe at the moment? We do not know what will happen next. There is an air of uneasiness. It is a grave moment when our government and other democratic governments, the defenders of freedom, must indeed be concerned. I hope that we shall begin to realize that our greatest security is our faith in God, confidence in ourselves, and confidence in our great country. It is a moment when we can afford to be a little more tolerant that we would be under ordinary circumstances. It is a time when we should know who our friends are, because at this very moment the enemy is boring from within, and that will make the situation just that much worse should something unforeseen occur. I hope that in the days to come we shall address ourselves to the task of so equipping our nation and building up the morale of our people by training and otherwise that we shall be equal to the test of defending ourselves, though we may never wage an offensive war.

Just one brief thought in closing about our austerity program. I am emphasizing this austerity feature, because I do not think it is too late yet for the government to turn back and listen, to the voice of reason. In the ordinary course of events, thousands of people will wish to visit our country. That is what we call our tourist trade.

The time is not far distant when we must give careful consideration to plans for this season and, as a matter of fact, plans are no doubt under way at the present time. If it is possible for the American to purchase 81.10 of goods in Canada for his dollar I am sure our coffers will be that much richer. You may correct the United States dollar situation by the restrictions that are at present in effect. I am not going to deny that. But in doing so you are very likely to wreck the whole Canadian economy. That is the concern of Canadians today, because businessmen are confused. No one knows exactly where to turn or what position to take at the present moment. There is ample evidence that the moment the government took this position, someone paid and Canada was the loser.

It is not very long ago that the Bank of Canada was bidding for victory bonds at

The Address-Mr. Case

a very substantial premium. Many people made substantial fortunes, having purchased victory bonds only to turn them over two or three months later, and I presume the Bank of Canada was the purchaser. The bonds were purchased at par and sold at $104.50 and as high as $106. Now these bids are withdrawn, and it causes one to wonder, because I know that Americans were large purchasers of our bonds. They could purchase them after they had been on the market for so long, and they were able to purchase them with that $1.10. Do not think they did not speculate on the possibilities of the Canadian dollar returning to par, so that when it returned to par they would be able to turn in those bonds and convert their money into 100 cents on the dollar in Canada. Therefore I often ask myself the question why the government maintained this bid on dominion government bonds until it did, in the sense that the Americans were secure. Whether it was to encourage them to believe that this was a good place to put their money, I am not prepared to say.

I had a great deal to do with war finance in the early days of the war, having headed up seven victory loan campaigns in my community, and having been for two and one-half years chairman of the war savings certificate campaign to encourage people to put their money into that form of investment. Many millions were invested in war savings certificates ; and I would emphasize that $40 a m-onth would return $50 a month in seven and a half years' time, these being the only government bond in the world paying 34 per cent interest compounded' semi-annually. Now look at the situation. It is true that their $40 will be worth $50, but every $4 will purchase only $3.60 worth of goods, and every $40 only $36, as compared with the time at which the investment was made.

I say, therefore, that the Canadian investor has been taken down the road, and now it would appear the time has come when people who invested in these war savings certificates, with a sense of security and in the belief that they were building up something worthwhile, find that their expectation has been entirely dissipated because of the policy which this government has adopted, which has led to confusion, higher prices and an increased cost of living. Our building trades are stagnant and no one knows where to go or what to do. Costs are out of line and people are inclined to wait and see. And while we are waiting to see we are losing the advantage of the tremendous volume of production of which our nation is fully capable under normal circumstances.

I say to the government that the sooner it gets out of business which private enterprise can look after, and utilize all the latent power which is evident among the individuals within our nation, the sooner we shall recover and be on our way to solid prosperity.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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BPC

René Hamel

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. RENE HAMEL (St. Maurice-La-fleche):

Mr. Speaker, before addressing the house in French, I feel it would be appropriate to give to the English-speaking members of the house an idea of the subject with which I intend to deal. My intention is to deal with the important problem of national unity. In my opinion there are two fundamental reasons why the major groups of this country are divided.

The first reason why we are divided is the fact that we have not the same conception of the part our country should play in the British commonwealth of nations. Some people seem to be satisfied that Canada sacrificed on the altar of the empire her last man and her last dollar. Others, among whom I place myself, disapprove such a stand.

The second reason why we are divided is that the two major groups in this country do not give to our constitution the same interpretation. We feel that we have given in Quebec, to the Protestant minority, better treatment than that given to our compatriots in the other provinces.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

John Ewen Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR:

Nonsense; not in British Columbia. That is a lot of horse feathers.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

He is speaking for himself.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

John Ewen Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR:

We have a Catholic premier and we are glad to have him.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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BPC

René Hamel

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. HAMEL:

In conclusion, Mr. Speaker, I will propose in the federal sphere a few reforms which in my opinion would improve relations between the two major groups in the country.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, during this debate on the address in reply, I shall deal with a matter of perennial timeliness for almost two centuries, namely that of good understanding between the two major groups of our population, Canadians of French origin or of Catholic faith and Canadians of English descent.

Though intending to deal only with the differences between French and English Canadians may I say at the outset that in my opinion the problem is not confined to those two groups in particular. In its population of about 12 million souls, Canada numbers some

The Address-Mr. Hamel

5,700,000 people of British birth or descent, nearly three and a half million of French stock and almost three million who have come from different countries, mostly Europeans.

Those three million Canadians have retained, I am sure, a perfectly legitimate attachment for their native lands and created among themselves bonds of solidarity which are a credit to them and which I would be the last to condemn. The various national societies they have formed to safeguard their common interests are sufficient evidence of the bonds of solidarity which unite Canadians of Ukrainian or Polish descent, as well as of other nationalities.

Italian and German-born Canadians had to disband their associations for a few years, but I would be much surprised if they did not reorganize at the first opportunity. We cannot solve the problem of national unity in Canada without taking into account that important ethnological factor.

Statistics on immigration and emigration show that, from 1851 to 1941, we have brought in 6,699,226 foreigners to help us develop and build our country. On the other hand, during the same period, we have witnessed the sad spectacle of a mass exodus, which drew away 6,301,320 citizens from our country.

I contend, Mr. Speaker, that we have no right to remain unmoved by such statistics, and must ask ourselves why so many citizens have failed to adapt themselves to their new country or to find a decent living among us.

For the time being, I shall confine my remarks to the causes of the rift in the two main groups of our population.

One reason for our lack of unity is that the word "country" does not mean the same thing to both. Granted, we all consider ourselves Canadian citizens but we do not attach the same meaning to this status. In the eyes of some, Canada is but a secondary nation bound to sacrifice its interests on the high altar of the British commonwealth of nations. Canadians of French descent feel, however, that their first loyalty belongs to Canada and cannot resign themselves to seeing their country become the cat's-paw of the British commonwealth of nations. May I remind those who deem such language rather strong and the Canadian people at large of the following facts . . .

(Text):

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

John Ewen Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR:

I rise to a question of privilege, Mr. Speaker. Once again may I ask when in this house the rule against the reading of speeches is to be observed. The

hon. member is not only reading but is reading at close range. If he intends to read his speech, surely to goodness he should be able to read it on his desk.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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SC

David Réal Caouette

Social Credit

Mr. CAOUETTE:

He is only consulting his

notes.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

John Ewen Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR:

We shall not be through by August if this goes on.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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BPC

René Hamel

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. HAMEL:

You do it yourself.

(Translation):

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. I would point out to the hon. member that he is forbidden by standing orders to read his speech.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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BPC

René Hamel

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. HAMEL:

I did not understand your remarks, Mr. Speaker.

(Text):

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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LIB

John Ewen Sinclair

Liberal

Mr. SINCLAIR:

The rule is against the reading of speeches.

(Translation):

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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IND

Paul-Edmond Gagnon

Independent

Mr. GAGNON:

The hon. member for St. Maurice-Lafleche is doing exactly what the hon. member for Outremont (Mr. Rinfret) did some days back when he introduced a bill.

(Text):

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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CCF

Wilbert Ross Thatcher

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. THATCHER:

The hon. member for Vancouver North will never be a cabinet minister if he is going to take that attitude.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

Neither will you.

Topic:   QUESTIONS AFFECTING MEMBERS' TRANSPORTATION -WIVES AND DEPENDENT MEMBERS OF FAMILIES
Subtopic:   TABLE SHOWING AGE DISTRIBUTION OF THE POTENTIAL LABOUR FORCE 15-04 YEARS BY REGION, 1941-1971
Permalink

March 2, 1948