February 13, 1948

THE MINISTRY

CERTAIN POWERS OF MINISTER OF TRANSPORT TO BE EXERCISED BY MINISTER OF RECONSTRUCTION

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I wish to table copy of order in council P.C. 529 of February 10, 1948, passed under the authority of the Public Service Rearrangement and Transfer of Duties Act, relative to certain powers of the Minister of Transport to be exercised temporarily by the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply.

Topic:   THE MINISTRY
Subtopic:   CERTAIN POWERS OF MINISTER OF TRANSPORT TO BE EXERCISED BY MINISTER OF RECONSTRUCTION
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HUMAN RIGHTS

INTERNATIONAL BILL OF RIGHTS-APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Perhaps at this time I might answer a question asked yesterday by the hon. member for Lake Centre (Mr. Diefenbaker), as follows:

Has Canada made any recommendations as yet to the united nations with respect to the composition of the international bill of rights, or with respect to any rights which should be included therein?

At the time my hon. friend asked the question I had not noticed that there was a question much to the same effect already on the order paper, asked by the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles), which reads:

1. Has a copy of the international bill of rights, which was approved by the commission on human rights at its meeting in Geneva, been received by the Canadian government?

2. Has Canada been asked for comments on this international bil-1 of rights before it is submitted to the general assembly of the united nations?

3. Have such comments been given?

4. If so, what is the nature thereof and will parliament be given an opportunity to express itself on this matter?

I can answer both questions at the same time, as follows: Canada is not a member of the commission on human rights which was charged by the economic and social council

of the united nations with responsibility for drafting an international bill of human rights. The government, therefore, has not had occasion to consider the draft.

The international bill of human rights has recently been formally submitted in draft form to member governments of the united nations for their comment. It is the intention of the government to have the draft referred to the joint parliamentary committee on human rights and fundamental freedoms for its consideration, when the committee has been set up.

Topic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Subtopic:   INTERNATIONAL BILL OF RIGHTS-APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

May I ask a

supplementary question? Have any of the provinces made representations to the dominion government against the acceptance of any of the principles embodied in the international bill of rights?

Topic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Subtopic:   INTERNATIONAL BILL OF RIGHTS-APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am informed that the Minister of Justice has been in communication with the attorneys general of the provinces, but I am not able to say at the present time what answers the minister has received. Perhaps I might direct the attention of the Minister of Justice to the hon. member's question, and have it answered later.

Topic:   HUMAN RIGHTS
Subtopic:   INTERNATIONAL BILL OF RIGHTS-APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE
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HYDE PARK AGREEMENT

STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT


Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Secretary of State for External Affairs): Mr. Speaker, on February 3 the hon. member for Swift Current (Mr. Bentley) asked a question about the Hyde Park agreement. At that time he asked if there were any details about it unknown to parliament. I answered immediately that I was not aware that there were any, and that the Hyde Park agreement had not been set out in any document other than the communication to the press of April 20, 1941, which had been tabled1 in parliament. Since that time there has been an exchange of notes between the government of the United States and the government of Canada in May of 1945, which I think I should table, Hyde Park Agreement



so that hon. members may have not only the details relating to the Hyde Park agreement itself, but anything that has flowed out of the agreement since that time. As a result of the Hyde Park agreement, joint economic committees were formed, composed of interested officials of both countries, the function of which was (1) to achieve more efficient utilization of the combined resources of the two countries in the production of the defence requirements; and (2) to reduce postwar economic dislocation consequent upon the changes which the economy in each country had undergone. The joint economic committees were set up on the Canadian side by orders in council P.C. 4500 of June 20, 1941, and P.C. 7227 of October 4, 1941. While these committees were successful in achieving their first object, little progress was made in regard to the second, and by mutual agreement they were dissolved in 1944, Canadian action being taken by P.C. 2586 of April 11, 1944, following an announcement made to the press on March 14, 1944. A year later, on May 7, 1945, a note was received from the United States embassy proposing that the general principles of the Hyde Park declaration be continued on a fully reciprocal basis for the remainder of the war and that the same spirit of co-operation between the two countries should characterize their treatment of reconversion and other problems of mutual concern as the transition to peacetime economy progresses. In our note of May 15, 1945, the Minister of National Defence, who was then the Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs, replied welcoming the assurance of the government of the United States that it would continue to deal with the problems of the transition from war to peace in the spirit of the Hyde Park declaration. Further, it was stated that the government of Canada, on its part, desired to assure the government of the United States that the same spirit of co-operation which was manifested in the Hyde Park declaration would characterize the Canadian government's consideration and treatment of the problems of the period of transition which are of mutual concern. At the instance of the United States, publication of these notes was withheld at the time, although the substance of the understanding evidenced by the notes was communicated to the press in Ottawa and in Washington on May 21, 1945. From then until last October the notes were treated as confidential; but in response to a request from the United States Department of State permission was granted by Canada in October last that they be released to the United States Senate small business committee. And I understand that they have since been published in the United States. I should like to table them. Perhaps it would be convenient to hon. members if they «ere printed as an appendix to Votes and Proceedings so that they may have the exact terms. If that is agreeable to hon. members I would ask that that be done.


LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Has the minister leave of the house to table these documents?

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Agreed.

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

And is it the pleasure of the house that these memoranda be printed as an appendix to Votes and Proceedings'!

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Agreed.

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

I should like to ask a question arising out of the tabling of the exchange of notes in May, 1945, regarding the Hyde Park declaration. Is it a fact that as a result of these notes the United States is now precluded from placing an embargo on oil or steel or coal so long as the Hyde Park declaration is in effect?

Mr. ST. LAURENT: I was advised many times from the other side, even when I was Minister of Justice, that I should not venture to express any legal opinion in the house.

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

I am not asking for any.

Mr. ST. LAURENT: The notes have been tabled and the house has agreed that they be printed as an appendix to Votes and Proceedings. I think the hon. member will wish to draw his own conclusions from the terms of those notes.

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER :

It all depends upon what the intentions of the government were. The minister Should know.

Topic:   HYDE PARK AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT IN REPLY TO REQUEST FOR TABLING OF AGREEMENT
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PRIVATE BILLS

February 13, 1948