January 28, 1948

FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONSERVATION

CANADIAN PARTICIPATION IN MARSHALL PLAN


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

I had a question which I had planned to direct to the Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott) but speaking to him a few moments ago he intimated that it might more properly be directed to the Secretary of State for External Affairs. I do not expect an answer immediately, but perhaps I might be permitted to ask the question. In view of the legislation before the house dealing with the conservation of Canadian foreign exchange I I should like to ask if the government has received any official representation from the government of the United States as to the manner in which Canada should participate in the European recovery program commonly spoken of as the Marshall plan? If so, will the minister make it available to the house at an early day?

Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Secretary of State for External Affairs): When I have seen the exact terms of the question just asked by the leader of the opposition I will be better able to give him an answer.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONSERVATION
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PARTICIPATION IN MARSHALL PLAN
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VETERANS AFFAIRS

HOUSING-BRAE FOOT AND OTHER SUBDIVISIONS


On the orders of the day: Hon. MILTON F. GREGG (Minister of Veterans Affairs): I should like to answer three questions which were asked yesterday with regard to the Veterans Land Act. The hon. member for Lincoln (Mr. Lockhart) asked whether meetings similar to the one held in AVindsor had been held with veterans from Niagara Falls, Welland and St. Catharines. I should like to inform the house that late in October an official of the department did meet with those veterans who were resident on the Welland, St. Catharines and Port Colborne subdivisions. On the basis of his report of that meeting certain recommendations in regard to adjustments on the selling price to veterans are now before the government. The hon. member for Nanaimo (Mr. Pearkes) raised a question yesterday in connection with the Braefoot Veterans Land Act subdivision at Victoria, British Columbia. I would tell the hon. member that the director of the Veterans Land Act has visited this subdivision during the past two weeks and made a personal inspection of the situation. He returns to Ottawa early next week and I am awaiting his report and will have further information later. The hon. member for Royal (Mr. Brooks) asked yesterday what proportion of the cost of remedial repairs to Veterans Land Act houses is being charged to contractors and what proportion will be paid by the government. It is not possible to give a specific reply to this question at this time. The remedial program, as hon. members well know, is an extensive one, and is not yet completed. As my predecessor assured the house, close study is being given to the question of costs incurred and expenditures made under the remedial repair program by senior officials of the department including legal officers. Where the department finds that action should be taken to recover from the contractor I can assure the house that action will be taken.


PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. FLEMING:

Is the minister in a position now to answer the question I asked him yesterday with reference to submitting this whole question to the public accounts committee or a royal commission?

Topic:   VETERANS AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   HOUSING-BRAE FOOT AND OTHER SUBDIVISIONS
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LIB

Milton Fowler Gregg (Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. GREGG:

I am not in a position to answer that today.

Topic:   VETERANS AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   HOUSING-BRAE FOOT AND OTHER SUBDIVISIONS
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POSTAL SERVICE

REQUEST FOR SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER REMUNERATION OF RURAL MAIL COURIERS


On the orders of the day:


PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Peel):

Mr Speaker, I should like to inquire of the Postmaster General, in view of the acute concern which prevails among the rural mail couriers whether he intends to act on the suggestion made last session by myself and others in the house that a special committee be set up to inquire into and try to find a solution for this problem, which has gone unsolved too long.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER REMUNERATION OF RURAL MAIL COURIERS
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LIB

Ernest Bertrand (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST BERTRAND (Postmaster General):

Not exactly in the form my hon. friend suggests, but I intend to bring a bill

The Address-Mr. Mclvor

before the house asking for a year's extension of the legislation of last year in order that supplementary payments may be made to the rural mail contractors.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER REMUNERATION OF RURAL MAIL COURIERS
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GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed from Tuesday, December 9, consideration of the motion of Mr. J. A. Dion for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the amendment thereto of Mr. Bracken, and the amendment to the amendment of Mr. Coldwell.


LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. DANIEL McIVOR (Fort William):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure we all remember the fine atmosphere that was created in all parts of the house by the mover and the seconder of the address in reply to the speech from the throne. I congratulate them on their efforts.

My first word today, notwithstanding the finding of my deskmate yesterday, must be to pay my tribute to two great Canadians. Neither of these men occupied the first position in my mind when I came into the house in 1935. One of them I thought was a little over-cautious and the other I thought a bit loud. But when I saw these two men in action and when I learned that the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) began his day by keeping quiet and reading a chapter out of his old bible, I knew that under his leadership the country was safe. And when I saw the late Lord Bennett in action, sitting over yonder, I could not but admire him, and today I prize amongst my chief treasures a book autographed by him, the life and times of John Wesley. Of course if the book had been the life and times of John Knox I would have appreciated it just as much.

Nobody living in Canada today can say that price control is not a live issue, unless he is blind or just does not know. We at the head of the lakes are intensely interested in price control and I do not know of any better way of investigating the subject than by the special committee which the Prime Minister has promised to set up. While I am not advertising myself I should like to be on that committee because there are things which I think I know.

Of course, Mr. Speaker, I represent Fort William, which together with Port Arthur at the head of the lakes and the Thunder Bay district is going to be the hub of Canada. We have industries at the head of the lakes which I am proud to say pay their men decent wages. If the hon. member who is president of the Great Lakes Pulp and Paper Company

were here I would perhaps say a little more, but I know that labourers are taken into that pulp and paper company at ninety cents an hour to start. I think that is good pay, considering that I myself when a student got a job wheeling brick at fifteen cents an hour.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. There is too much noise in the house and it is difficult to follow the hon. member.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. McIVOR:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am not accustomed to speaking to an audience that is not quiet, but my hearing comes to my aid now.

We have in Fort William a progressive city council which believes in advertising home industries. We have an industry there known as Canada Car which manufactures street cars and trolley buses. Just as that industry was coming to the top and showing that it could produce a good thing, the city of Fort William scrapped its street cars and now we have nothing but buses. I am sure that hon. members from the east and the west would like those trolley buses immensely, they are so efficient and comfortable. There is one thing I should like to say about that industry. I hope there will not be any other industry set up in Canada that will be treated otherwise than Canada Car is treated. The company has established an expensive tooling and jig equipment plant costing thousands of dollars, and this industry is now the father of perhaps twelve other industries in Fort William which it supplies with work and helps to keep the employment rate in Port Arthur and Fort William very high.

The needs of Fort William stand out prominently. Let me mention first our public park. We have at the head of the lakes perhaps the best tourist attractions that there are in Canada, but the park is pretty well surrounded by Indians. I pay my respects to my fellow Indians of whom I happen to be an honorary chief of the Chippewa tribe. When you ascend Mount McKay, if you happen to come to the head of the lakes, and I am sure that the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Howe) will be glad to provide free transportation, you go up and up and then all at once you can see Thunder Bay and the two cities of Port Arthur and Fort William like twin sisters living together in harmony and peace. The Rocky Mountains has no scenery to equal it, and the maritimes none to surpass it. We think that Mount McKay would be a great attraction for tourists not only from the United States but from Canada, both east and west. It would let our people

The Address-Mr. Mclvor

east and west see what we have. It would teach the people from the west to be very modest in speaking of their own beauty spots. Half way up the mountain the scenery is magnificent. I have heard of a man travelling west who was so much affected by this scenery, thrust upon him suddenly as he came to the mountain, that he could not speak.

Seventeen miles west of the head of the lakes we have Kakabeka falls with a 190-foot head. Niagara falls excels it in having more water, but not in having more beauty. The next need that we have in Fort William is development of the trans-Canada highway in order that people may pass through and see what we have. The third need at the head of the lakes is that which is occupying a very prominent place today in the country to the south of us, the St. Lawrence waterway. We think that is an absolute necessity. Whenever this matter has been discussed all the governments of Canada have supported it.

We need the development of our mines, and I am glad to know that the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Howe) will keep an eye on this because he has an eye capable of looking ahead and seeing what will be to the best advantage of Canada. When I think of the Shebandowan belt which runs away up to Atikokan, which was investigated by the Department of Mines and Resources, I have visions of what can be accomplished in that great area. I want to emphasize that. If any hon. members have money to help develop it I should be glad to give them information. In that belt can be found gold, silver, zinc, lead, nickel, platinum, chromium and other valuable minerals. They are all there ready to be tapped, and we expect that some day there will be great development. It is reported that a camp is to be set up there consisting of four hundred men. Of course we cannot vouch for the accuracy of these reports.

In the constituency of the Minister of Trade and Commerce there is Hemlo, a very fine mining prospect. I have a resolution on the order paper which is in the interest of prospectors, and it will be dealt with later on.

Another thing that worries us at the head of the lakes is the pension of veterans of the first war. I can see a man living in a cottage who was getting $100 a month, perhaps a little more now; he has to pay his rent. If he had not enlisted in the first war he would1 be earning $250 a month today. I can see another young man who played on our football team. He was getting $30 a month. He did not get farther than England; but I think that under the leadership of the Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Gregg) such cases will be taken care of.

Our old age pensioners also need further consideration. As I said last year, if the Liberal party is left in power long enough the old age pensioner will be getiing $50 a month. I addressed a group of old age pensioners before I left the head of the lakes. I asked how many of them were getting the Ontario bonus, and there was not one. When I think of the progressive spirit of the Premier of Ontario I believe this condition will be remedied pretty soon and old age pensioners will not be paid $30 a month but $40. If that comes about before very long I will not take a back seat in thanking the Premier of Ontario for his generosity, but I am not going to thank him until these old age pensioners get their $40 a month.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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January 28, 1948