May 22, 1947

CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP-FORMER CANADIANS IN GERMANY AND ITALY

LIB

Mr. WINKLER:

Liberal

1. How many cases have been reported to the government where Canadians visiting in (a) Germany; (b) Italy, prior to world war II, were either induced to renounce their Canadian (British) nationality voluntarily or under duress ?

2. Of the above, how many ex-Canadians have applied to have their Canadian citizenship renewed?

3. Of the above, how many had their holdings taken over by the Alien Property Custodian?

4. Of the above, how many have (a) returned to Canada; (b) indicated a desire to return to Canada?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP-FORMER CANADIANS IN GERMANY AND ITALY
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LIB

Colin William George Gibson (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. GIBSON (Hamilton West):

Return tabled.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN CITIZENSHIP-FORMER CANADIANS IN GERMANY AND ITALY
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WESTMINSTER HOSPITAL, MIDDLESEX COUNTY


Mr. WHITE (Middlesex East); 1. How many employees at Westminster hospital, county of Middlesex are on a temporary basis? 2. What number of years has each of them been temporarily employed? 3. How many are on a permanent basis? 4. How many employees of the dominion government in the county of Middlesex, other than Westminster hospital, are on a temporary basis? 5. What number of years has each of them been temporarily employed? 6. How many are on a permanent basis?


JUDGES ACT

ASSOCIATE CHIEF JUSTICE, PROVINCE OF QUEBEC- ADDITIONAL JUDGE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA


Right Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Justice) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient to present a measure to amend The Judges Act, 1946, to change the title of the superior court judge in and for the province of Quebec, who is appointed to perform the duties of the chief justice in the district as constituted for the Court of King's Bench sitting in appeal -within which the chief justice does not reside, Montreal or Quebec, as the case may be, to "The Associate Chief Justice"; and to provide a salary for an additional judge of the Supreme Court of British Columbia. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house.


PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CHURCH:

The same principle should apply to the senior judge of the county court of York, Ontario, who does similar work.

Topic:   JUDGES ACT
Subtopic:   ASSOCIATE CHIEF JUSTICE, PROVINCE OF QUEBEC- ADDITIONAL JUDGE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Motion agreed to. [Mr. Ilsley.l Inquiries of the Ministry


INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

INVESTIGATION OF INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES- PROVISION FOR BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS, ETC.


Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient to present a bill respecting industrial relations and investigation of industrial disputes and to make provision therein for the payment out of the consolidated revenue fund of the remuneration and expenses of the members of the boards and commissions and the officers, clerks and employees appointed or engaged by or under the authority of the act. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


PRAIRIE FARM ASSISTANCE

CROP FAILURE PAYMENTS-AWARDS TO FARMERS WITH MINIMUM PRODUCTION


Right Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient to present a bill to amend The Prairie Farm Assistance Act, 1939, to provide that the two schedules of payment now provided under the emergency year section and the crop failure section be merged and become payable in any year without specific authority from the governor in council and without requiring that a minimum number of townships be eligible before the crop failure schedule of award is payable; that the restriction in respect to the payment of awards to farmers with a certain minimum production of wheat may be removed; and that certain provisions be clarified in order to facilitate administration. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


PRAIRIE FARM REHABILITATION

STATEMENT OF PRESENT POLICY


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture):

In answer to questions asked previously on the orders of the day, I should like to make a statement.

The question whether the principles of the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Act should be extended to all Canada by legislation this session has been up on a number of occasions

during the session. As previously stated in answer to questions by members, the government has been considering the matter. I am now authorized to make the following statement of present policy.

The present Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Act will be continued as applicable to the established P.F.R.A. area in the three prairie provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta.

This act was passed in 1935 and amended in 1937, 1939 and 1941. It provides that works may be undertaken to rehabilitate certain areas in the prairie provinces even though the constitutional position is that such works are the responsibility of the province or municipality. There were, however, a number of special circumstances which justified P.F.R.A. Included in these is the fact that the dominion government administered the lands and resources of the area during its period of settlement and the further fact that there was reason to believe at that time that a very large area was subject to drought so severe and of such long duration as to make permanent residence difficult if not impossible without conservation and distribution of water. The experience prior to 1935 tended to substantiate that belief. The dominion government therefore set up P.F.R.A. under which the settlers are assisted to rehabilitate the area.

The act provides that on the advice of committees set up under authority of the act and to obtain certain results the minister may expend such money as is voted by parliament and authorized by the governor in council for "the development, construction, promotion operation and maintenance of any project or scheme under or by virtue of this Act, or enter into agreements with any province, municipality or person with respect thereto."

The organization set up by the Department of Agriculture has been operating under this act since 1935. The money voted has been spent to conserve and distribute water, to organize submarginal lands into community pastures and regrass areas within these pastures and to finance experimental work intended to stop soil drifting. The money spent to conserve and distribute water has been spent on dugouts, small dams and small irrigation projects.

The government provides from one-third to one-half of the cost of providing dugouts and small dams. The individual or the individual and the municipality provide the balance.

The government builds the dam and main distribution ditches in the small irrigation

Inquiries oj the Ministry

projects. The individual pays for the water delivered at a designated point and organizes and finances his own irrigation district under provincial legislation. The government has assisted in levelling land.

The government fences, regrasses and provides capital expenditure to put water on community pastures. The individuals pay fees to place stock in the pastures.

The whole programme is one in which the dominion government cooperates with the individual in rehabilitating the area. The individual does much of the work and either contributes to the cost or pays for services received. In many cases, both for the construction of pastures and for irrigation projects, farmers have been required to make their land available to the government and receive in return the value of the land unimproved by the project or other land in exchange.

We have now reached the time when larger irrigation projects are being proposed to P.F.R.A. The government has provided funds with which to proceed with the construction of a dam on the St. Mary river in Alberta. This is an international stream, and the total cost of this dam is being provided by the dominion government.

The objective of the whole programme is to make it possible for settlers who were induced to enter the area to remain and to 30 develop its possibilities of water conservation and use as to greatly increase the number of persons who may live in Canada's largest agricultural area.

It has been suggested that because of the benefits already apparent in the area to which P.F.R.A. has been applied, the principles of the act should be extended by legislation to all other parts of Canada,

In view of the constitutional relationship between the dominion and the provinces the government has decided that such legislation should not be recommended. It is held that the same obligation does not exist in other parts of the prairie provinces or in the remainder of Canada as in the drought area of the prairie provinces.

It is considered, however, that there are certain works outside the drought area whicti if undertaken -would be of assistance to all Canada through making possible increased development of farm lands which if left to provincial or municipal responsibility might greatly retard Canada's development. With regard to these the dominion government would be prepared to discuss with the provinces concerned plans under which development could proceed over a period

to be agreed upon, sufficiently long to bring about the desired results, but not to exceed five years.

Among these projects are:

1. The dike or marshlands of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick;

2. Certain projects related to farm lands in British Columbia, and

3. Certain projects related to lands all across Canada which have not previously been utilized as cultivated farms but which, if developed, would provide increased employment and home building possibilities.

Any expenditure of money on these projects will be brought before parliament and legalized through an item on the estimates.

Topic:   PRAIRIE FARM REHABILITATION
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF PRESENT POLICY
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May 22, 1947