May 8, 1947

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

BANKING AND COMMERCE


Fifth report of standing committee on banking and commerce.-Mr. Cleaver.


RAILWAYS AND SHIPPING-SECOND REPORT- REFERENCE OP CERTAIN ITEMS TO COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY


Mr. S. M. CLARK (Essex South) presented the second report of the special committee on railways and shipping owned, operated and controlled by the government.


LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. DOUGLAS ABBOTT (Minister of Finance) moved:

That items Nos. 434, 435 and 479 of the estimates for 1947-48, approved and reported upon on Thursday, May 8, 1947, by the sessional committee on railways and shipping owned, operated and controlled by the government, be referred to the committee of supply.

Topic:   RAILWAYS AND SHIPPING-SECOND REPORT- REFERENCE OP CERTAIN ITEMS TO COMMITTEE OF SUPPLY
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Motion agreed to.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


APPLES AND HAY-GREY COUNTY, ONT.

PC

Mr. CASE:

Progressive Conservative

1. To whom was the concession awarded in connection with tenders for apples and hay in the A.F.V. range, St. Vincent township, Grey county?

2. What was the amount of the successful tender?

3. Was this the highest tender submitted?

4. What was the amount of the second highest tender and by whom was it submitted?

5. Is the concession let for a period of five years ?

6. Has a surety bond been required to guarantee the proper care and maintenance of the orchards? If so, in what amount?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPLES AND HAY-GREY COUNTY, ONT.
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LIB

Mr. LAPOINTE: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. Mr. H. L. Isaacs, Thornbury, Ontario.

2. $3,800 a year.

3. Yes.

Questions

4. $3,500 a year. Mr. Richard F. Doran, Meaford, Ontario.

5. Yes.

6. No.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPLES AND HAY-GREY COUNTY, ONT.
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SUGAR BEET DISEASE-NEMATODE

PC

Mr. MURPHY:

Progressive Conservative

1. What areas in Canada are infected with the sugar beet disease known as nematode?

2. Are any areas infected with any other sugar beet disease? If so, where?

3. What efforts are being made to control or eliminate these diseases?

4. Is transport of sugar beets restricted in any of these areas? If so, where, and what transport restrictions or orders are in effect?

5. Have any representations been made with respect to control or elimination of this disease? If so, by whom ?

6. Has any provincial government suggested a dominion and provincial proposal, contribution or action to control or eliminate this disease? If so, what provinces made such offer or proposal and what action has the government taken?

7. What are the main causes for spreading this disease, and what, if any, action by entomologists, engineers or other government agents has been taken or recommended to eliminate such causes?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SUGAR BEET DISEASE-NEMATODE
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LIB

Mr. GARDINER: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. A single field at Glencoe, Middlesex county, Ontario, and twenty-three farms embraced in an area of approximately four square miles at Blackwell, Lambton county, Ontario.

2. Yes. Sugar beet diseases of at least occasional economic importance in Canada, together with the provinces in which they are known to occur, are listed below:

Cercospora leaf spot (C. beticola)-British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick.

Fusarium root rot of seedlings (F. culrno-rum)-Alberta.

Phoma leaf spot and black leg (Phoma Betae)-British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario.

Ramularia leaf spot (R. beticola)-British Columbia.

Rust (Uromyces Betae)-British Columbia.

Damping off (Rhizoctonia Solani)-Manitoba.

Black root of seedlings (various fungi)- Ontario.

Black heart (boron deficiency)-Ontario, Quebec.

Curly top (virus)-British Columbia.

Savoy (virus)

Ontario.

Mosaic (virus)-Ontario.

Rhizoctonia rot (Rhizoctonia Solani)- Ontario.

3. All the diseases listed are under observation or study and where of known value or use recommendations for their control are made known to the affected growers or industries:

Cercospora leaf spot, Fusarium root rot, Phoma leaf spot and damping off are only occasionally sufficiently prevalent to be of economic importance, but not sufficiently so to warrant recommending control measures.

Ramularia leaf spot and rust are occasionally severe enough to cause an appreciable decrease in crops of beet seeds in the Fraser river valley and on Vancouver island, B.C. These are under study at the Dominion Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Saanichton.

Black heart, which occurs occasionally, can be controlled by an application of borax to the soil.

Curly top and mosaic occur occasionally in seed fields, and can be controlled by roguing the infected plants in the seed fields and in the fields where stecklings are being grown.

Savoy is occasionally present in sugar beets destined for the sugar factory. Since infection has already taken place, nothing can be done to control the trouble; removing the infected plants only reduces the crop. -

Black root of seedlings is prevalent wherever sugar beets are grown in south western Ontario. Several fungi are usually found associated with the trouble, and some adverse soil condition is no doubt partly responsible. It may cause as high as six per cent of the acreage sown to sugar beet in that part of Ontario to be abandoned-ploughed up and sown to something else. It is more prevalent in late sown than in early sown sugar beet fields. This trouble is being investigated by the Dominion Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Harrow.

Rhizoctonia rot of sugar beet may cause a loss of roots as high as 20 per cent in some fields in some years. Crop sanitation and crop rotation are the only practicable means of control.

4. Yes. The nematode in question, Hetero-dera schachtii, has been designated a plant disease within the meaning of the Plant Disease Act of the Province of Ontario, R.S.O. 1937, chapter 346 (as amended by 1941, chapter 42, and as amended by 1942, chapter 30). The regulations under this act are in force in the Blackwell area described as follows:

"The area in the township of Sarnia, in the county of Lambton, bounded on the north by lake Huron; on the east by the Brigden side-road from lake Huron to the king's highway No. 7; on the south commencing at the Brigden sideroad by the king's highway No. 7 in a westerly direction to where the said highway curves south, thence continuing along the old road which continues westerly from the point

Questions

the king's highway No. 7 curves south to the sideroad between lots 21 and 22; and on the west commencing at the said- old road in a northerly direction to [DOT] lake Huron along the sideroad between lots 21 and 22, and as continued northerly to lake Huron, is hereby designated as a 'precautionary area'."

The transport restrictions in this area, as covered by regulation under this act, are as follows:

"Sugar beets within the precautionary area shall not be transported, except by railway cars, outside of such area and sugar beets from outside such area shall not be transported into the precautionary area provided that sugar beets outside the precautionary area may, with the written approval of the provincial entomologist, be transported to the London Road shipping station.

"(a) Wagons and trucks used in the precautionary area in the handling and delivering of sugar beets shall have boxes with tight fitting bottoms and. tight fitting sides and ends for four inches above the bottoms and shall be free from holes and cracks of sufficient size for dirt to sift through.

"(b) In the precautionary area sugar beets shall be forked from the boxes of the wagons and trucks and all the dirt remaining in the boxes shall in each case be weighed out with the wagons and trucks.

"In the precautionary area dirt shall be returned to the field from which the sugar beets are harvested.

"Earth from railway cars used in the transportation of sugar beets from the precautionary area shall be completely removed by washing at the sugar factory and all such earth and water shall be disposed of in a manner approved by the provincial entomologist."

Further orders in effect are:

"Sugar beets on any field which is found to be infested with the nematode, Heterodera schachtii (Sugar Beet Strain), shall be harvested as early as possible and shipped in as few railway cars as may be arranged.

"Beet seed shall not be grown within the precautionary area.

"If the owner or lessee of any property affected by the provisions of the act or of these regulations, fails to comply with the act or these regulations, or if the owner or lessee of such property is out of the province or his whereabouts are unknown to the inspector, the inspector, with the approval of the provincial entomologist, may make such arrangements as he deems necessary to have such control measures or treatments carried out and any expense incurred shall be payable

by and recoverable from the owner or lessee of any such property in accordance with the provisions of the act."

5. Yes. By the Canada and Dominion Sugar Company.

6. No. There being no proposal no action could be taken.

7. The nematode is spread by flood water, transported in infested soil on the best crop or crop remains, by mud and soil adhering to footwear, the feet of farm animals and equipment. The restrictions stated above in reply to questions 3 and 4 are all designed to reduce to the practical minimum the spread of the nematode. The pest has been under study and investigation since 1931. For the last two years, in cooperation with the sugar company and chemical industry, the dominion Department of Agriculture has been actively studying the utility of soil fumigants as a control measure. These might, if an ideal fumigant could be found, conceivably eliminate the pest.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SUGAR BEET DISEASE-NEMATODE
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INDIANS-MOTHERS' ALLOWANCES

CCF

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Has any assistance in the form of mothers' allowance been paid to Indians on reserves in the province of Quebec by the government of that province?

2. Were instructions given to any officials of the Indian Affairs Branch to have this assistance discontinued? If so, what instructions?

3. What steps have been taken by any officials of the Indian Affairs Branch to have such payments discontinued?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INDIANS-MOTHERS' ALLOWANCES
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LIB

Mr. GLEN: (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. No.

3. The Acting Inspector of Indian Agencies in verbal conversations with the responsible provincial officers drew their attention to the existence of duplication of relief services already provided by the Indian Affairs branch, as a result of such payments.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INDIANS-MOTHERS' ALLOWANCES
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FEED GRAINS-COST TO NOVA SCOTIA FARMERS

LIB

Mr. WINTERS:

Liberal

1. Has there been an increase in the price of No. 1 feed barley and No. 1 feed oats since 17th March, 1947, and, if so, how much?

2. Did the above-mentioned increases in the price of barley and oats increase the cost to Nova Scotia farmers of feeds involving these grains?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FEED GRAINS-COST TO NOVA SCOTIA FARMERS
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May 8, 1947