February 6, 1947

BPC

Maxime Raymond

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. R AYMOND (Beauharnois-Laprairie):

You merely have to look at the order paper to find that it now contains forty resolutions on which we shall not be able to speak because we take up the time assigned to members to discuss the debate on the speech from the throne.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

That is true.

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BPC

Maxime Raymond

Bloc populaire canadien

Mr. RAYMOND (Beauharnois-Laprairie):

These are the few remarks that I wanted to make and which, I believe, are in the public interest. I shall now refer to the amendment and the sub-amendment to the motion under discussion.

As regards the sub-amendment, I have two reasons for opposing it. First, because it advocates the application of a purely socialist doctrine which I cannot endorse. Today I shall confine myself to saying that I am opposed to any dictatorship, and that a state dictatorship, with its cumbersome bureaucracy, is no better than a capitalistic dictatorship. We believe, however, that while favouring in principle private enterprise in industry, the state should prevent the formation of cartels and unfair monopolies, or at least hold them in check.

Another reason why this sub-amendment should be rejected is that it includes the amendment moved by the leader of the official opposition (Mr. Bracken) which I cannot support.

Should the amendment be adopted, general elections would follow, and an important measure announced in the speech from the throne would be dropped. I refer to the measure providing for the readjustment of representation in the House of Commons in accordance with the provisions of the recent amendment to the British North America Act. Everyone knows that under the new readjustment measure the province of Quebec will have eight additional members, that is 73 instead of 65.

I feel that the leader of the opposition has moved his amendment at an inopportune moment. If it were passed, the province of Quebec would suffer a grave injustice by being deprived of a just representation in this house. Therefore, it will not have our support. Need I add, however, that our refusal to support the amendment moved by the leader of the official opposition does not mean that we have complete confidence in the present administra-

The Address-Mr. Gagnon

tion. We shall consider on their merits the measures which will be introduced and which we shall support or reject as the case may be.

This is the stand taken by our group which I intended to define clearly.

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IND

Paul-Edmond Gagnon

Independent

Mr. PAUL EDMOND GAGNON (Chicoutimi) (Translation):

Besides providing the

praise conventionally directed to the government at the opening of each session, the interesting speeches of the mover and the seconder of the address in reply gave us increased appreciation of the oratorical gifts of the hon. member for Prince (Mr. Mac-Naught) and made us admire the talents of the new member for Richelieu- Vercheres (Mr. Cournoyer). I congratulate them and hope that my hon. colleague from the province of Quebec will feel easier on Liberal benches than did his predecessor during his last years of life.

No country holds to-day a higher place in the esteem of the other nations

it is said in the speech from the throne about Canada.

That is why, no doubt, the special deputies charged with paving the way to final negotiations in the Council of ministers for Foreign affairs told our High Commissioner in London on January 14, that they did not feel able to give Canada the assurance that it would

. . . eventually discuss a peace settlement with Germany.

That is why again we were practically forgotten by those known as the Big Three and we were assigned a back seat at the time of the peace talks with Italy. No country ranks higher in the esteem of other nations.

A grandiloquent statement, that had a semblance of truth in the years 1939-1945 when we were being forced to help others gratify their ambitions, when more Canadian victims were being sought for the battlefields of Europe and Asia, when Canadians were making billion dollar gifts to countries richer than ours, when everything was being sacrificed for war and the government was distributing posters bearing the frightful words: "Nothing matters now but victory." Then indeed in the eyes of to-day's Big Three, who then seemed small, depressed and almost despaired, and whose vast needs could only be satisfied by the labour, blood and rationing of the Canadian people, then indeed "no country held a higher place in the esteem of other nations."

But to-day, when we would like to contribute a stone to the erection of the building which we worked to bring down, when it is a matter of dividing the spoils, when the time has come to claim gratitude and material

compensation in payment for our past liberality, when we wish to assert our rights and proffer our demands, although Canada, as the Right Hon. the Minister of External Affairs (Mr. St. Laurent) stated:

. . . contributed her resources of men and material without reserve, and no question of partial participation arose,

there is hesitation and we probably will be denied the role so dearly won by our epic struggle on all fronts.

However, had our delegates to the united nations conference, instead of getting tangled in Spanish affairs and clamouring against France, demanded representation at the peace conference charged with the drafting of the treaty with Germany, may we not believe that Canada would not, at present, be in the humiliating position of having to be satisfied with mere protests?

At the Paris conference, it was Mr. Evatt, Minister of External Affairs for Australia, who fostered the cause of small nations and demanded uniform treatment for all. Our delegates remained silent. We are now reaping the results of their inertia.

Sad, bitter sequence of events which goes to prove that artlessness, lack of foresight and maladministration lead to disaster and ruin.

Mr. Speaker, if one is to believe what the newspapers have reported, what, especially, the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) has stated, and what a single word in the speech from the throne seems to imply,_ the government intends to launch Canada in a policy of mass immigr'ation of the kind that, in the past, has had no beneficent results but has left nothing but a bitter memory.

This new attempt, no doubt, is meant to satisfy the demands of ship owners and public transport companies as well as the secret ambitions of imperialists and those who like fishing in troubled waters. As the hon. member for Dorchester (Mr. Tremblay) so well expressed it, on January 28, 1944, we have no faith in:

-"those moving contractors."

On February 2, 1944, the hon. member for Portneuf (Mr. Gauthier) strongly endorsed that statement. The policy was branded as "antinational" on January 22, 1947, by the editor of Le Soleil, the organ of the Liberal party in the province of Quebec, who added:

Despatches cabled from London indicate that the British government is willing to admit into Britain any foreigner able to contribute to the economic recovery, and that, on the other hand, they would have no objection to the emigration of those among their citizens who, on account of their inclinations or their age, are dependent on public charity. John Bull is thus giving a lesson in political economy which should be profitable to Canada. Of what advan-

The Address-Mr. Gagnon

tage would it be for a young nation to increase its present difficulties by welcoming outsiders who are dissatisfied with their lot? Canada has not yet found is possible to provide suitable shelter to all her repatriated veterans, to meet the requests of her labouring class, to open ,new markets for her farmers or to offer sufficiently well paid jobs to hundreds of thousands of seasonal unemployed. The idea of importing Scotch or Welsh miners is brought up at the very time when the Cape Breton miners rightfully complain about the conditions in which they live.

From the standpoint of Canada, the sole reason for the agitation in favour of mass immigration is that the transatlantic transport companies have not enough goods to bring from Europe to operate as profitably as in normal times. Should our national future again be jeopardized in order that the requirements of private interests might be met?

As far as I am concerned, as the representative of a constituency where the population is largely made up of working men, I shall oppose any plan whereby the entry into Canada would be granted to outsiders who might take the place of our workers and deprive them of their jobs.

The speech from the throne also tells us, among other things about the negotiations that have taken place and the taxation agreements vdiich have been concluded between the dominion government and various provinces since the last dominion-provincial conference.

Recently, the Right Hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) denied that he sought to jeopardize the autonomy of the provinces by subjecting them to his supremacy. The Prime Minister claims that provincial autonomy has never been threatened and censures the Quebec premier for having stated that Ottawa has violated every agreement, one at a time. Is it not true, however, and does history not prove that the dominion government never returned the provincial rights and prerogatives it had taken over although many of them were surrendered only temporarily?

Dominion government encroachments and centralization:

1890-Bills of Exchange Act.

1917-Federal income tax Federal sales tax.

1919-Bankruptcy Act.

1927-Imperial confiscation of Labrador.

1932 Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission.

1934-Bank of Canada.

1936-Centralized harbours administration.

1939- Central Mortgage Bank.

Suspension of provincial borrowing

power.

1940- Dominion Unemployment Insurance.

1941- Dominion Succession Duty Act. Sirois report, of federal inspiration.

83166-13i

1942- Dominion tax on corporations.

1943- Amendment to the constitution

against the will of Quebec, in order to avoid redistribution of electoral ridings.

1944- Dominion Family Allowances, for

small families.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh! Oh!

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IND

Paul-Edmond Gagnon

Independent

Mr. GAGNON:

Dominion Industrial Development Bank.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh! Oh!

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IND

Paul-Edmond Gagnon

Independent

Mr. GAGNON:

The present method of bargaining is not very reassuring to the pioneer provinces. Quebec is justified in resisting. We must defend our rights and not sell them. - ,

In concluding, I wish to thank the Minister of Transport (Mr. Chevrier) for the prompt attention he gave to my representations and those of the various public organizations of my riding with regard to the lack of freight cars for the shipment of paper manufactured at Jonquieres, Kenogami and Port Alfred. May I remind him also that the Canadian National Railways which serve our district do not give the service which a population of 160,000 may rightly expect. A substantial section of the present right-of-way needs to be rebuilt without delay and it should be greatly shortened. At present, the trip from Chicoutimi to Quebec City and vice versa is an over-night one although the distance is only 160 miles; further, travelling conditions are unbearable. I believe that in view of the substantial revenues which the C.N.R. derives each year from our district, revenues which will increase in future as a result of the development of our industries and the growth of our population, the expenditures entailed by this project would be entirely justified. It behooves the government to solve this urgent problem which I deem it my duty to bring to the attention of the house in a manner satisfactory to the people of the Chicoutimi district.

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IND

Herbert Wilfred Herridge

Independent C.C.F.

Mr. H. W. HERRIDGE (Kootenay West) (Text) :

I rise this evening for one purpose only, namely, to pay tribute in brief language to a man who was the friend of man. Mr. Speaker, I consider it my duty and a privilege to give expression to the sentiments of all the people of my constituency and the sentiments, I know, of hon. members concerning the passing of the late W. Iv. Esling in early December last.

The late Mr. Esling came to the Kootenays in the early days of mining in Rossland. He was not long in that community before his worth was recognized. When he first came

Tributes to Deceased Members

there he entered into the publishing business, publishing various newspapers in various parts of Kootenay West. From the days of his first arrival he took an active part in the community of Rossland and in the surrounding district, and it was soon found out that the late Mr. Esling was a friend of man. As the result of his interest in civic affairs and in his fellow human beings, he was nominated and elected to the provincial legislature, and in -that field served his constituents for some years. Later on he was nominated and elected to this house and, as many hon. members know, served the constituency of Kootenay West continuously for twenty years. The late W. K. Esling's record of public service for all and -to all, his kindness to all and his friendship for all will never be forgotten by those who had the pleasure of knowing him throughout the years.

I know, Mr. Speaker, that you will pardon a personal reference. I was a constituent of the late W. K. Esling during his twenty years of service in the house. As a constituent of his I had frequent occasion to have contacts with him in connection with business which concerned my own community, business which concerned the farmers of Kootenay AVest, business which concerned the veterans of Kootenay West, and on behalf of -the farmers of Kootenay West I want to say that they will never forget the interest the late W. K. Esling took in the welfare of -the farmers of -that district.

On behalf of the veterans of Kootenay West I want to express their sentiments and their feelings. They also will never forget -the strict attention always paid by the late W. K. Esling to the necessities of the returned man and to his requirements.

In addition to that, on two occasions the late W. It. Esling and I were political opponents. It is during an election campaign, possibly more than on many other occasions, that the true temper, the true character, and the true qualities of men are exhibited. In all the campaigns fought by Mr. Esling during the period of twenty years never _ once was he ever known to utter a personality or to say a slighting thing about an opponent.

I could give many interesting and illuminating illustrations of his kindness. In election periods we have a difficult country to travel in and I could tell you of his personal kindness and his assistance to opponents of all parties. Looking back to those campaigns, I remember him as a chivalrous gentleman in every sense of the word.

In brief, Mr. Speaker, I know that my constituents and those members of the house who knew the late W. K. Esling will say that he

was a good man, and I use the word "good" in -the old English sense as meaning that which is productive of happiness and springs from virtue. I know that all my constituents, regardless of political affiliations, and all hon. members of this house who had the pleasure of knowing -the late W. K. Esling, can join with me in saying:

When time, who steals our years -away, shall steal our pleasures too,

Fond memories ot his ways will stay and half our joys renew.

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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent

Mr. LIGUORI LACOMBE (Laval-Two Mountains) (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, I

wish, at the outset, to join my humble voice to those of my colleagues in paying a tribute to the memory of the former member for Richelieu-Vercheres, the Hon. Mr. Cardin, with whom I had been acquainted for more than twenty-five years. With so many others, I have many times applauded his eloquence, which was enhanced by a voice as resonant and clear as -crystal. When the splendid speaker he was uttered his heartfelt words, it was for those who heard him at the height of his oratorical power, a moment of rapture, a spectacle so fine, so delightful, that it can only be equalled by the sight of an audience enthralled by the love of beauty and grandeur.

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LIB

Sarto Fournier

Liberal

Mr. FOURNIER (Maisonneuve-Rosemont):

Hear, hear.

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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent

Mr. LACOMBE:

Never more will our colleague hear the plaudits of his compatriots. But his memory and his work are unperishing. The party he has not only served but so often led to victory well knew that "the shadow of Cardin could still win battles". In the Richelieu-Vercheres by-election, much capital was made out of his brilliant career.

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LIB

Sarto Fournier

Liberal

Mr. FOURNIER (Maisonneuve-Rosemont):

Beware!

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Liguori Lacombe

Independent

Mr. LACOMBE:

But it is extremely unfortunate that so worthy a man should have to enter the grave before receiving encomiums which he so richly deserved when he was alive. His successor in this hoiise is privileged and. knowing his inclinations and his talent, we augur for him a fruitful and brilliant career.

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Sarto Fournier

Liberal

Mr. FOURNIER (Maisonneuve-Rosemont):

Hear, hear.

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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent

Mr. LACOMBE:

As regards the hon. member for Pontiac (Mr. Caouette), I tender him deserved compliments for the poise and the pluck lie has shown in his excellent maiden speech in the house.

Mr. Speaker, the time has come to find a solution to our domestic problems. It is all very well to proclaim that we shall participate

The Address-Mr. Lacombe

in the international discussions relating to the peace treaties. But it is imperative that each and every one of the Canadian provinces should be restored its respective jurisdiction. It would be inconsistent to attempt to establish peace and order throughout the world while leaving full sway to injustice in our own country. Our first duty is toward Canada. In the discharge of that duty we should never forget the respective jurisdiction of the dominion and the provinces. Let us render unto all what belongs to them and let us respect the prerogatives of all. The powers of the provinces are defined by the constitution. Let us at least respect that charter of our rights. So many contracts have been torn to pieces. So many agreements are being scrapped in the world that it is worthwhile that we should respect our own constitution. The speech from the throne states that after prolonged conferences, agreement has been reached on certain peace treaties which the house will be asked to approve. Why not concur in a new dominion-provincial conference and come to this indispensable agreement in dominion-provincial relations? Conferences without number are being held abroad while Canada is being denied a third dominion-provincial conference. The time has come for each to assume once again its proper place in its own field. Let the provinces be restored in the full exercise of their rights. If it be true, as the speech from the throne puts it, that "the changeover from war-time conditions has proceeded rapidly," why does the federal government persist in levying taxes in a field reserved to the provinces?

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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ABBOTT:

It is not reserved to the provinces.

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IND

Liguori Lacombe

Independent

Mr. LACOMBE:

There is in the treatment handed the provinces an economic and social aspect that cannot be ignored. In claiming regard for the constitution, and the exercise of provincial jurisdiction, the prime ministers are discharging duties that are part of their responsibilities. Who can blame them for the discharge of their mandate when they uphold provincial rights guaranteed by the constitution? It is time we went back to normal living. "Many of the controls and restrictions in force during and immediately after the war are no longer in existence," states the speech from the throne. But there are no worse restrictions than those imposed on the exercise of provincial rights, in defiance of the constitution. They should be the first ones to go, because they set up injustice and create mistrust where, more than anywhere, mutual trust and good understanding should flourish. No wonder

there is so much friction in labour relations in this country, when the baleful example of mistrust comes from so high.

Strikes interminable have broken out in Canada, ruining in certain sections the worker's credit. They have slowed down the production of many essential commodities. They have been the greatest impediments to the development of our domestic and foreign trade. Due to the scarcity of building materials, there is an acute shortage of housing. Living costs are steadily rising. The worker feels it more than any other class of taxpayers. He is entitled to wages that will allow him to provide for himself and for his family. That is a social problem that we cannot and must not set aside. Everyone should receive a fair and reasonable reward for his labour. And that is why the government must unstintedly seek settlement of the conflicts between capital and labour, and treat, each party concerned with the greatest possible fairness.

I wish to take up another matter, for a moment. It is of interest to both producer and consumer. I refer to the withdrawal of the subsidy paid by the government to the milk producer. In spite of an adverse vote on this question at the last session, the government did not in the least follow the advice of the house.

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LIB

Hervé-Edgar Brunelle

Liberal

Mr. BRUNELLE:

It is a provincial matter.

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Liguori Lacombe

Independent

Mr. LACOMBE:

They withdrew from both producer and consumer a precious help at the very moment when they needed it most. My hon. friend tells me that this is a provincial matter. If the federal government assumed the responsibility of paying a milk subsidy, will my hon. friend admit that they have violated provincial autonomy? The withdrawal of the federal milk subsidy is unfortunate. coming at a time when every effort should be made to maintain it. It was both a necessary encouragement to the dairy industry and a help to the children and, the family. The government, who have made so many sacrifices in other spheres, could have earmarked a few million dollars annually for a highly humanitarian cause: child health and assistance to the dairy industry. I prefer a strong and healthy generation born in Canada to any kind of immigration, no matter how selective.

Since immigration is an item of the sessional programme, I come to it, without more ado. This matter has already provoked lively debate in this house. It has been studied from all its aspects. In view of what has occurred in the last few months, I say that we cannot be too strict concerning the physical and moral

The Address-Mr. Lacombe

I want to point out that our king is not merely a figurehead. Our king represents the people of this great united nations organization we call the British commonwealth. Our king does not represent the Liberal part}' or the Conservative party; he represents the people and the people alone. His representative is here in the person of our Governor General and the lieutenant governors in the provinces. Many nations hope that they can get a monarch similar to our representative, but they are finding that they cannot get one, once he is destroyed.

How is it possible to get from any one of our families a king to represent the people who is unbiased? How can we produce him? We cannot. If we ever lose our king, and I am certain we never shall, then this whole empire will break up and for thousands of years our people will become enslaved. Covetous eyes have been focused for many generations on this marvellous institution we call the British commonwealth of nations. We cannot avoid thinking how these nations making up the commonwealth have been associated with one another. They have grown up, not under any great plan, but naturally in their own way. There are tremendous differences in colour of skin, in race, in creed and in culture. So is it not marvellous that not one of us has ever thought of going to war with another member of the commonwealth?

Only this evening I was speaking to a naval officer who told me that there is no colour bar to anyone joining the British navy or the Royal Canadian Navy. No questions are asked, merely whether the man is a British subject and is loyal to the British commonwealth of nations. I have something here which I am proud to put on the record. This is a booklet called "The Sea Cadet Log." The director of the naval reserves here in Ottawa, Captain H. E. Pullen, wrote a short article for the boys in the sea cadets. This contains one or two simple sentences which I feel apply to us here in this house just as they apply to the boys in the sea cadets.

Before I quote this article I should like to point out that I am particulary interested in the navy because I was brought up beside the sea. Every male member of our family has been a seafaring man, serving either in the navy or in the merchant marine. I have had the privilege of travelling considerably on the oceans. Each member of our family had his particular duties to perform. No matter how stormy the night was, those who were capable had to go out in the lifeboats, a voluntary service, to rescue any sailors who were in distress at sea. This was a duty per-

formed by my older brothers and, as a little boy, my job was to take hot chocolate, which my mother prepared, down to the seashore to serve to the seamen as they were brought in. That was a simple duty taught to me as a little child. If all [DOT] Canadian citizens were taught the few simple duties outlined in this article by Captain Pullen then our country will go far toward peace, freedom and prosperity. Captain Pullen says this to these boys:

Nowadays it has become the habit to cry down such old fashioned ideas as "duty" or "discipline". They imply restraint, control of mind, tongue and body, respect for others and the art of "giving". In other words, to have a high sense of duty and discipline requires moral and physical courage. It isn't easy. We all fail at times. The secret is to keep on trying and never, never give up.

And later on:

Therefore, I pass on to the sea cadets this message: "Always keep in mind the promise you made when you joined the corps-have high ideals and stick to them."

That is what we all should have.

Remember you are a Canadian and live in a country w'hose future lies in your hands. Give of your best, and never think of how much there is in it for you. Develop your sense of duty and discipline; you can never lead until you have first learned to obey, and above all keep this motto in your mind, "Fear God, honour the King, do your duty."

There is a message for every one of us in this house because this parliament is being undermined. Unless we do something about it very soon I am certain this parliament is going to disappear and bureaucracy will take over control. Of course many people say, "It cannot happen here." They said in England, "It cannot happen here." They said in Germany, "It cannot happen here." But it happened. It happened in Russia, it happened in Germany and it happened in Italy where the people lost practically everything; they lost their souls. What a disgraceful state of affairs for any group of human beings to find themselves in, faced with poverty, wretchedness and growing insecurity. That terrible state of affairs was brought about because the members of their parliaments did not do their duty. Perhaps in the first place they never knew their duty. Our duty is what we were taught as children. The duty is taught us by Lord Jellicoe and followed by our great statesmen. Our first duty is to see to the welfare of the people of Canada, of our constituencies, the citizens whom we represent. That is our duty.

I said that it can happen here, and I am making this statement here now: It is happening right here. I think it wras perhaps a good thing that I was not here to stand on my feet

The Address-Mr. Ashby

and speak in this house last summer and last fall because I might have gone too far at that time. Two men came to my home. They apparently knocked on the door. I was busy, and the first thing I knew they were walking into the house. My wife came to me and I asked her, "Who are they?" She said, "I do not know. I opened the door and they walked in." "What do they want?" I asked. "I do not know," she said. I left my work-I was typing at the time-and went into the sitting room, and here they were walking in to meet me in my study, without having been invited in any shape or form. They said they were checking up the wealth of Canada and would like to ask me a few questions. "Certainly," I said, "where are you from?" They said they were from Edmonton and had come from the Department of National Revenue. They began asking me all sorts of questions. I told them, "I hire a chartered accountant to look after my business. Why don't you get his statement?" They said they would not accept any accounts but their own. "We make up our own statements." Instead of staying an hour or two hours or three or four or five or six or seven hours, they stayed the whole day, absolutely uninvited. Before they went they just threw me a paper saying, "Here is what you owe on your income." I took the thing and threw it in the fireplace.

After they had gone a woman neighbour came over, and she burst into tears when she got into our home. She told us that two of these men had been over to her house, had entered the home uninvited and would take no statements from her and her husband at all. They also hired a chartered accountant to look after their business, but these two men asked them all sorts of questions just as they had done with us. These neighbours of ours had saved up their money during the whole of their lives and just before the war they started to clear the land to build their home, but they did not get it finished, I think, until 1941. These men actually taxed them on that home which had been built with the savings they had been accumulating throughout their lives. Afterwards the husband broke down. The son who had been with him said, "Well, dad, I got no wages during the whole of the war and I worked from twelve to sixteen hours a day, and now I am finished." The son walked out of that home and I do not think he will ever return.

I drove to another neighbour's. Here was a man who could neither read nor write and so he employed a bookkeeper because the taxation officials demanded it. When they handed him his tax bill he could not understand it, and he actually gave them a blank 83166-14

cheque and said that he did not know of how much they had robbed him. When they had gone, what did he do? He discharged the help that he had; and he went to his barns and opened the doors and turned all his dairy cattle out into the stacks except one that he kept for himself, and he said, "As long as I live I shall not milk another cow to feed a bureaucrat."

I got home and my own boys were there. I said, "Sharpen up your pitchforks, boys. This may be a revolution. Clean up the barrel of your gun and keep it well oiled. We may have to fight yet for our homes and our farms right here in Canada, for this is the beginning of socialism."

My boys said, "Where will we get the money to pay this tax because we have not made any excess profits?" We had paid any income tax that was due. My boy did not receive wages. Any money that we had we put back into our farm because I told them from the beginning, "Boys, this is not my farm; it is not mother's farm. It belongs to us; it is our home, our farm, and our duty is to maintain and build up the fertility of this farm." We do not burn straw as some of these master-farmers have done in the past, but we bought equipment to work back fertility into the soil rather than destroy it. My boys asked, "Where shall we get the money to pay these taxes?" I said, "I cannot give you any more. If I give you any more from my indemnity I shall have to starve myself in Ottawa. I could, of course, eat in the cafeteria once a day and save a few pennies in that way, but if I put it back into the farm they would rob us of it." I said, "I am not going to do that any more. What have you got to sell? We shall have to sell something to pay these taxes." One boy put his arm around one of his calves and said, "They shall not take my cattle," and the other boy said, "They shall not take my sheep." I said, "Then the only thing to do is to sell the hogs." That was no laughing matter, because for twenty-five years I had been building up, I believe, one of the finest herds of bacon hogs in the Dominion of Canada. In fact, some years ago when I entered my hogs in the advanced registry tests I beat the whole of Canada including all the experimental farm entries at that time for the breed. That is true. I have the records and I would have brought them here if I had thought I was going to mention this matter tonight. I could bring grading slips showing every hog in the load grading A. So I went to the telephone, and when I hung up, every one of those hogs was sold, breeding stock that had taken us twenty-five years to build up-all that has gone-and not one hog'will be born

The Address-Mr. Ashby

on our farm until these taxes are removed. That is what I mean when I say, remove the restrictions on production. These taxes must be abolished and they will be abolished even though it may require another vote by the citizens of Canada against these bureaucrats.

So that when people think it is not happening here they had better change their minds because it is happening here.

I have a letter here which I received from these bureaucrats. It is addressed to me. Do they sign their names and say, "Your obedient servant"? Not at all. They are above all that. 1Ye, the sovereign parliament of Canada, mean nothing at all any more to these bureaucrats. Look at this. Here is a letter that any man can see. Does this bureaucrat sign his name? Does his salutation say, "Dear Sir"? Not at all. He says, "Take notice". Does he sign his name, "Your obedient servant"? Not at all. "Yours truly"? No. He just signs his name with a great flourish, the simple-minded idiot.

Some bureaucrat heard that I bought a little boat and so I got this letter. It says:

Information which has come to hand leads us to believe that you are the owner of a cabin cruiser on the west coast. Kindly advise the purchase price and date of purchase. A prompt reply is requested.

This is from a bureaucrat. Can you imagine it? I wrote back and I asked what authority they had for asking all these inquisitorial questions. They did not know, of course, so that they had to write to Ottawa to find out. A month later they sent me a long letter. None of these letters are signed. There is just a rubber-stamp on them and various initials. A bureaucrat never faces personal responsibility. He can always say, "Well, I did not know anything about it. One of the girls must have got my rubber-stamp". They are always shirking personal responsibility. They sent me this long letter and I discovered that they have sneaked acts around us that we know nothing about. They can actually go into any home and demand that a woman strip naked before them. That is true. They can demand to know how much they paid for every article of dress they are wearing and when they bought it. If they do not answer, what then? The act says that a person in default shall be liable on summary conviction to a penalty of not less than $25 for each day. Did we know anything about that? No, of course not. "It can not happen here." It is happening here.

These bureaucrats did not forgive me, because I left them standing at attention before that mythical and fabulous prime minister of mine last session. I did not

prorogue that parliament. I left those bureaucrats standing to attention with both hands cupped behind their ears, hon. members will remember. It may be that they are offended because I did not prorogue that parliament and dismiss them. I left them standing there ever since but I will dismiss them right now.

Hon. members will recall that the members of that fabulous parliament stated briefly and simply the results the people desired. Our prime minister, the Right Hon. Sir Bonehead Piltdown, turned toward these bureaucrats to give them instructions to devise ways and means of producing these results, when the most surprising thing happened. Who should step out of the ranks of those bureaucrats but the deputy minister of taxation, the very individual I should like to get my hands on, the very individual who robs the working man of his hard-earned wages, who robs the white-collared worker of his take-home pay, who robs the women and widows of their mites and the little children of their chocolate bars? If I ever get my fingers around his windpipe I will strangle him. He is walking right into my hands.

That bureaucrat, the deputy minister of taxation of that day, walked right by the prime minister. He did not even bow to the Speaker; he ignored the altar itself but gave the members of parliament a very extraordinary salute. He turned his back on them, scratched in the sand rapidly for a few moments, then shook each foot in turn at them and started to clamber to the top of the prime minister's boulder, at the same time exposing a very reputable part of his anatomy, to the delirious delight of the members present and amidst the most obstreperous titterings of the ladies who had gained vantage points thereabout. The policeman on duty found it necessary at that time to eject a couple of teen-agers who momentarily lost their self-control and shouted out, "hubba, hubba", which, I understand, means there is going to be something doing now.

Reaching the top of the boulder, this insulting deputy minister of taxation stretched himself to his full height of five feet, raised his hand; but instead of making a speech as was expected, sang the latest song hit of the day. "You no can do; you no can do, because the socialist London school of economics teaches us that you no can-" He never did reach that top note. Stretching his chickenlike neck to its greatest extremity, his Adam's apple fluttering like the feathers of a song sparrow singing to its mate in June, and treading about that boulder like a young rooster

The Address-Mr. Ashby

trying to learn to crow, he missed his footing and slid off into the arms of prime minister Bonehead who had stood below staring up at him in open-mouthed amazement, until a fly lit on his lower lip and, with a snap, promptly lost its life.

The members looked at one another with sober faces and then to the prime minister for advice and guidance. The prime minister merely winked at them, and then with the forefinger of his right hand extended while he held the struggling deputy minister of taxation by the throat in the crook of his left elbow, made circular motions around the poor fellow's cranium, whereupon they quickly led him off into the bush and clubbed him to death as a factious financial fanatic,

I am sorry, Mr. Speaker, to have had to kill this bureaucrat but I had no other alternative. The people of those days loved their freedom as only the people of this great British commonwealth will yet prove they love theirs. I could not put him into the penitentiary because there was nobody willing to sacrifice his freedom to look after such a man. Neither could I put him into an insane institution. I had no other alternative than to kill him. I see, Mr. Speaker, that my time is up.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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February 6, 1947