January 31, 1947

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture):

I shall be pleased to have a copy of the agreement with regard to hogs tabled as soon as possible. The other question is one which I think I can answer in a few words. Arrangements have been made to have an amount of butter brought into Canada from New Zealand and Australia as a result of the discussions that took place between the government of Britain, Canada. Australia and New Zealand, in order to make it possible to have the distribution of butter made in Canada which is provided for under the present rationing regulations. The amount which is brought in would only be sufficient to make that possible to May 1.

Topic:   FOOD PRODUCTS
Subtopic:   SALE OF HOG PRODUCTS TO THE UNITED KINGDOM
Sub-subtopic:   IMPORTS OF NEW ZEALAND BUTTER
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PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

Can the minister give any idea what the price will be?

Topic:   FOOD PRODUCTS
Subtopic:   SALE OF HOG PRODUCTS TO THE UNITED KINGDOM
Sub-subtopic:   IMPORTS OF NEW ZEALAND BUTTER
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The price of the butter laid down at the port will range from 38 to 48 cents. The butter which comes direct from New Zealand or Australia will be laid down at around 38 cents a pound, and that which comes by way of Britain will probably be in the neighbourhood of 48 cents.

Topic:   FOOD PRODUCTS
Subtopic:   SALE OF HOG PRODUCTS TO THE UNITED KINGDOM
Sub-subtopic:   IMPORTS OF NEW ZEALAND BUTTER
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NITROGEN PRODUCTS

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING WELLAND CHEMICAL WORKS AND ALBERTA NITROGEN PRODUCTS


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. P. E. WRIGHT (Melfort):

I wish to direct a question to the Minister of Reconstruction. In view of recent radio reports of criticisms by Canadian Federation of Agriculture officials with regard to the disposal of the Welland Chemical Works Limited and the Alberta Nitrogen Products of Calgary, can the minister inform the house of any negotiations that might have taken place between the Canadian Federation of Agriculture or others and the government with respect to the retention of either or both these plants under government orders?

Topic:   NITROGEN PRODUCTS
Subtopic:   CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING WELLAND CHEMICAL WORKS AND ALBERTA NITROGEN PRODUCTS
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply):

I shall be pleased to table the correspondence that took place. I believe letters were exchanged and I shall be glad to table them at an early day.

Topic:   NITROGEN PRODUCTS
Subtopic:   CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING WELLAND CHEMICAL WORKS AND ALBERTA NITROGEN PRODUCTS
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INQUIRY AS TO THE READING OF SPEECHES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. G. A. CRUICKSHANK (Fraser Valley):

Just so that this side of the house may not be left out entirely, Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask if the rule is to be enforced after today that members may not read speeches written for them by somebody else?

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO THE READING OF SPEECHES
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INQUIRY AS TO REVISION OF STANDING ORDERS

PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Peel):

Mr. Speaker, may I direct a question to the Prime Minister which has to do with a matter that came up in the house on the closing day of the last session concerning a revision of the rules of the house and the conduct of the business of parliament? Will the Prime Minister give consideration at an early stage of this session, because it would be useless at a late stage, either to setting up again the special committee on the rules which was set up last year and whose report seemed to get lost, or perhaps better, to having a conference between the parties in the house with a view to devising a better system for dealing with the business of parliament this session, particularly in regard to the submission of departmental estimates, or some of them at least, to committees of this house for consideration. There were 647 items in the estimates last year under thirty-one departments of government; I presume there will be about the same this year, and in view of the tremendous expansion in the business with which parliament has to deal I urge the government

Labour Conditions

and the Prime Minister in particular to give consideration to devising some method by which the business of the country may be dealt with in more orderly fashion and particularly to avoid the consideration of so many estimates for the first time at the very tail end of the session. I have some suggestions in that regard which I shall be glad to make later on to the Prime Minister and the Speaker, and which I hope will be constructive. I believe there is a way out and I think parliament ought to find the most reasonable way of dealing with this situation.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO REVISION OF STANDING ORDERS
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?

Thomas Hay

Right. Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I may say to my hon. friend in regard to reappointing a committee to revise the rules that, as he is aware, we have had two such committees, in the two previous sessions and, as my hon. friend has just observed, there did not seem to be that measure of agreement between hon. members that one would have wished to see. The government has considered this matter, and we have thought that for this session it might be: preferable to adopt the practice that has been followed in the United Kingdom, of passing, where it is thought necessary or advisable, what are known as sessional orders; that is to say, from time to time special resolutions which will govern procedure on the matters for one session only. In that way it will be possible to test out how a particular order may work. If it is found that it works satisfactorily, it is altogether probable that the rules would be amended in accordance with what had proven to be a wise course to follow. That is the view which the government holds at the moment. In the light of what my hon. friend has said, we would of course be happy to reconsider all aspects of it.

As to the question of arranging the business of the house in as orderly a fashion as possible,

I would say that I thought the conference which was held the other day in my office with the leader of the opposition and the leaders of the other parties was a good begin-ing in that direction-I hope that we may have meetings of that kind as the session goes on with a view to trying to arrange the business so that it will be proceeded with as rapidly and as orderly as possible.

As to the estimates, I have nothing to say at the moment beyond this, that it is a matter to which we shall also be glad to give consideration.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO REVISION OF STANDING ORDERS
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

THREATENED STRIKE OF COAL MINERS IN NOVA SCOTIA


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CLARENCE GILLIS (Cape Breton South):

May I be permitted to direct a question to the Minister of Labour? I did not send him notice of the question.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   THREATENED STRIKE OF COAL MINERS IN NOVA SCOTIA
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. BRADETTE:

The hon. member is starting a little early.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   THREATENED STRIKE OF COAL MINERS IN NOVA SCOTIA
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

Not any earlier than others; it may be a little more embarrassing.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   THREATENED STRIKE OF COAL MINERS IN NOVA SCOTIA
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January 31, 1947