January 30, 1947


Peace Settlement with Germany armed forces in the common struggle against Germany should have ample opportunity to express their views on the settlement of German problems which are of interest to them. 3. The council, accordingly, hereby invites the Canadian government to communicate in writing at its early convenience to the deputies for Germany its views on those aspects of the German problem which are of interest to it. 4. The deputies for Germany will study these expressions of view and submit them, with a report, to the council of foreign ministers at its next meeting. 5. If the Canadian government wishes also to present views on the Austrian problem it is requested that such views should be communicated in writing to the deputies for Austria whose instructions are to proceed with the preparation of a treaty recognizing the independence of Austria and to submit proposals on this subject at the next meeting of the council. 6. The Canadian government, and the other governments to which a similar communication is being addressed, will, of course, be given full opportunity if they so desire to supplement their written communications on Germany or Austria by oral presentation tor the deputies concerned. 7. Replies to this communication should be addressed to The Secretariat, the Council of Foreign Ministers, Lancaster House, London, S.W.l. Sincerely yours, Warren Kelchner, Secretary General.



14th January, 1947. Sir, I have the honour to enclose a statement which the Government of Canada has instructed me to communicate to the deputies of the council of foreign ministers. This statement is made in response to the invitation to make known its views on the settlement of German and Austrian problems which was communicated to the Canadian Ambassador in Washington by the secretary-general of the council of foreign ministers. The observations made in this statement on the procedures proposed for the preparation of the German settlement apply, mutatis mutandis, to the procedures proposed for the preparation of the Austrian settlement. I should be grateful if you would bring this statement to the attention of the deputies. I have the honour to be, Sir, Your obedient servant, N. A. Robertson, High Commissioner for Canada. The Secretariat, Council of Foreign Ministers, Lancaster House, London, S.W.l.



January 14, 1947. The essential interest of Canada, as of other countries, in the terms of the German settlement, is that it should provide the basis for a lasting peace. The Canadian government hope to submit later a statement of principles which, in their view, would contribute to this end, and on which detailed political, territorial and economic provisions of the settlement could be based. The Canadian government is, however, limiting its submission at this initial stage to the question of procedure and, in this connection, proposes that appropriate provision should be made by the council of foreign ministers for the continued association of Canada, as an active participant in two wars against Germany, in the preparation of the German treaty. The detailed application of this proposal would, of course, have to be worked out. To this end, it is suggested that Canada and other interested allies might, with advantage, work with the deputies, and take a full part in discussions both on questions of procedure and of substance relating to the German treaty. If this principle were accepted, it should be applied in a manner which would allow the various allied countries to assist in drafting those sections of the settlement in which they were most directly concerned. Collaboration of this nature at an early stage would have the advantage of acquainting all the allies in an intimate way with the problems which might arise during the preparation of the treaty. This procedure would also prevent the recurrence of the situation at the Paris conference, where the smaller powers were faced with previously drafted treaties, the details of which were unfamiliar to them, and which were difficult to change. It would be possible also by clarifying in a satisfactory Peace Settlement with Germany manner the procedure for drawing up this settlement to avoid differences of opinion on procedural matters at a later time, such as those which took up so many sessions of the Paris conference. The adoption of proposals of this nature would space the Canadian government in a position to participate, in the German settlement in an appropriate manner. If a procedure were devised which would make it possible for representatives of the smaller powers to be associated in the actual drafting of the treaty through work on the committees, and if the treaty so drafted were accepted without major changes when it was referred to the council of foreign ministers, it might then be possible to provide for the final acceptance of the treaty in the brief and formal conference, thus avoiding the necessity for a prolonged conference such as that in Paris, at which the Italian and other treaties were reviewed.


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the

members of the house have listened not only with interest but with entire approval to the remarks of the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. St. Laurent) with respect to this important matter. We, of course, have not seen anything of the documents except as they have appeared in the press. I want to thank the minister for taking the steps necessary to make those documents available to us now. I have just one question to ask. He has indicated that the provisional attitude of the government with respect to this matter will appear in the documents which he has tabled. Will the minister table all relevant documents at the earliest opportunity?

I should just like to say one thing further. In so far as we have been able to gather the attitude of the government, I personally wish to commend them for it. Canada played her part honourably in the war. Personally I feel that it would be an insult to this nation if she were denied the right to sit in at the discussions and settlement of the terms of peace with Germany. Without committing ourselves to approval of the details of whatever the government may have done, I do commend them for their general approach.

Having said that, may I take the opportunity of congratulating the minister on his appointment to the portfolio of External Affairs. I only hope that he will tell us more in the next few months than his predecessor has told us in his term of office. It was my privilege to sit with the right hon. gentleman for six or eight weeks in November and December last at the United Nations general

assembly; if he will only carry on as well here as he did there in those first two months, I predict that he will be a success in his new portfolio and that the members of the House of Commons will be well informed on external affairs. We wish him every success in his new office.

Mr. ST. LAURENT: The leader of

the opposition (Mr. Bracken) asked if all the relevant documents would be tabled. I do not know of any that would be relevant, other than the terms of the invitation that was received through the embassy in Washington, the first communication that was made to the deputies on January 14, and the covering letter referred to in the statement of today. I should be glad to add those to the documents tabled, and they will constitute the complete file of matters that were put in writing in. that connection.

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT FOR PRESENTATION TO SPECIAL DEPUTIES OF THE COUNCIL OF FOREIGN MINISTERS
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, in view of what the leader of the opposition (Mr. Bracken.) has said, and the report which has been made to the house by the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. St. Laurent), I think it would be well to let the government and the country know that, as far as we are concerned, we believe that the position, taken by the government in the initial stages of the discussion with the foreign ministers was the position that should have been taken.

I am wondering whether, at this late stage, the submission of even a memorandum does not detract from that original position. I would rather have seen the government of Canada stand firmly by the position that since Canada contributed during the war in every respect to the extent of her resources and, unlike some of the powers who are now denying us the right to speak at the conference, was in the war with Germany from the beginning, it might have been well if we had stood by the position originally taken.

I should like to say also that I think Canada has a contribution to make now. During the war we made our contribution in men and material. Since the war ended, Canada has made a tremendous contribution to the feeding of the suffering people of the world. These contributions should not be. overlooked. It seems to me we can still make a valuable contribution toward laying the foundations of a permanent peace and to the feeding of the peoples of the world. Canada should not be denied her right to participate fully in the drafting of the peace treaty with Germany.

Dominion-Provincial Relations

The government can be assured, I think, that both the house and, as far as I can assess the situation, the country are a unit in support of the government's demand for the proper treatment of Canada in this regard.

Mr. SOLON E. LOW (Peace River): Mr. Speaker, I wish to assure the government that we commend them for the position they have taken in this matter and that we will support them in that position, expressing at the same time the hope that good judgment will prevail in the council of foreign ministers, and that they will realize that good will and international good feeling cannot be promoted by denying a country like Canada the right to participate in the making of peace in a way comparable with the contribution and effort she made toward the winning of the war. We wish bo compliment the minister on what he has done thus far, and to assure him that we stand ready to support him with the country as a whole, as the leader of the C.C.F. party has said, in a strong position in this matter.

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT FOR PRESENTATION TO SPECIAL DEPUTIES OF THE COUNCIL OF FOREIGN MINISTERS
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PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

If the Prime Minister proposes to move the adjournment now I would crave the indulgence of the house to ask for certain other information. The Secretary of State for External Affairs, with the advice and cooperation of the Prime Minister, has given us certain information with respect to an important question of external affairs referred to in the address delivered to us this afternoon by His Excellency the Governor General. Many important subjects were referred to in that address; but one in particular, that of dominion-provincial relations, I am sure will be the subject of discussion during the coming week. I should like to ask the Prime Minister if at the earliest opportunity he will table all related documents and correspondence that the house has not already had, with respect to this important matter.

If I may be permitted to ask the question specifically I shall put it in these terms: will the Prime Minister lay on the table of the house at the earliest possible day a copy of all letters, telegrams, submissions, presentations, briefs or other documents, passing between the Prime Minister or any official of his staff, the Minister of Finance or any official of his department or any other minister

or official of the government, and any premier, minister or official of any provincial government, relating to the conclusion of any fiscal agreement between the dominion and any of the provinces.

I am sure the Prime Minister will welcome this request and provide the information as soon as possible. I would urge that he let us have these documents at the very earliest day, because we are going to debate this and other questions for a week, and then for two weeks we are to give way to government business. I hope the Prime Minister will look with favour upon my request.

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS TABLING OF DOCUMENTS AND MOTION FOB PRINTING
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?

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE ICING@Prime Minister

I had fully expected my hon. friend to ask for the correspondence and other documents to which he has just referred, and I have sought to anticipate his wishes by having the documents ready to table immediately. I was going to table them tomorrow, but I should like to oblige my hon. friend further by tabling them at the moment. This correspondence, I am informed, contains all matters of substance referring to the tax agreements, and dealt with by correspondence with the provinces since the budget of 1946. I know there are some messages, for example, to the premiers of certain provinces stating that they will find enclosed a copy or copies of a document or documents sent to other premiers. I do not know that these less important communications have been included, but I shall have them all gone over again to see that anything the house by any chance might wish to have is included, if it is not already here.

Therefore, Mr. Speaker, I ask to be allowed to table provincial-dominion relations correspondence since the budget of 1946, which I believe contains all correspondence of substance with respect to tax agreement negotiations with the provinces. It might further the wishes of hon. members if a motion were made to have this correspondence printed so that it would be available to the house in more convenient form. If the house is agreeable I would now move:

That 1,500 copies in English and 500 copies in French be ordered, for the house and printed at the expense of the house.

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS TABLING OF DOCUMENTS AND MOTION FOB PRINTING
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GRAYDON:

If you find something of substance afterward will it go in too?

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS TABLING OF DOCUMENTS AND MOTION FOB PRINTING
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It will depend on its size. I shall seek to bring forward everything of an official character.

House of Commons

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL RELATIONS TABLING OF DOCUMENTS AND MOTION FOB PRINTING
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PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Before the Prime Minister moves the adjournment of the house, in deference to the Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Mackenzie) I think we on this side should congratulate the right hon. gentleman upon the improved appearance of his associates on the other side. Their handsome features are greatly brightened by 'the carnations they are wearing, the bright red hues of which make it peculiarly appropriate that they should be placed over the hearts of hon. gentlemen who comprise the government.

But that is not all I want to say. As I have paid members of the government that delicate compliment, perhaps they will extend to me the privilege of offering our sincere congratulations to two gentlemen who happen to sit on this side of the house, each of whom has completed twenty-five years of continuous service in the House of Commons. I refer to the hon. member for Danforth (Mr. Harris), and to the hon. member for Haldimand (Mr. Senn). These gentlemen came to the House of Commons before some hon. members now here were very old. They came, I understand, early in 1921, and for twenty-five years, without any time off, have represented their constituencies continuously in the house. In other words, they have been here for a longer continuous period than any other hon. members, with the exception of the dean of the house, the distinguished hon. gentleman who represents the constituency of Quebec South (Mr. Power).

I am sure all hon. members will join with me in extending congratulations not only to those two hon. gentlemen who now celebrate the completion of twenty-five years in the House of Commons, but also to our associate the hon. member of Quebec South, who, I understand, has been here for thirty years. All hon. members will agree with me when I express the hope that all three of these distinguished hon. gentlemen will live long to serve their respective constituencies, though all may not agree with me when I express the hope that the two with twenty-five years of service to their credit will long continue to represent their constituencies in the same chamber in which they now sit.

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBERS HAVING COMPLETED TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF MEMBERSHIP
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I agree with

my hon. friend the leader of the opposition that on occasions it is pleasant to "say it with flowers". I am sorry I have not flowers

at the moment to send across to the hon. members opposite to whom he has just referred. However, I do join warmly with the leader of the opposition in extending heartiest congratulations to those hon. members upon having completed twenty-five years of service as members of this house. May I add that all hon. members on this side of the house will wish to join in these congratulations. We have all enjoyed the happiest relations with the gentlemen whose names have just been mentioned, namely the hon. member for Danforth (Mr. Harris) and the hon. member for Haldimand (Mr. Senn). So long as they sit opposite the government and give us the pleasure of looking at their countenances from this side of the house, I hope they may be spared for continued public service for years to come.

I wish also to thank the leader of the opposition for his congratulations extended to my hon. colleague the member for Quebec South (Mr. Power), and I join warmly with him in these congratulations. There was, however, one small error which my hon. friend made in his calculations and to which perhaps he will allow me to make reference. While I should be the last to wish to deprive my friend the hon. member for Quebec South of any distinction to which he may be entitled, and while in certain of its aspects it may not be the most pleasant reflection, it is a fact nevertheless that in time of membership measured by months and years, I stand today the oldest member of this House of Commons, and so happen to be entitled to be styled the dean of the house. That honour, however, is closely shared with the hon. member for Quebec South. I do not think there are many months differnce in the period of time we have served as members of the house, each having had a long term of service.

On motion of Mr. Mackenzie King the house adjourned at 5.05 p.m.

Friday, January 31, 1947

Topic:   PEACE SETTLEMENT WITH GERMANY
Subtopic:   MESSAGE RECEIVED BY THE CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES AND TELEGRAPHED TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS ON JANUARY 4
Sub-subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBERS HAVING COMPLETED TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF MEMBERSHIP
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January 30, 1947