August 21, 1946

PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GRAYDON:

May I ask the parliamentary assistant a question respecting the procedure? The hon. member had his questions before the house, and the rules were interpreted in such a way that he was not permitted to have them answered here. Then

they were sent to the war expenditures committee to be answered. The war expenditures committee having risen, in what position are other members of the house who have an interest in the answers to those questions? I realize that as between the parliamentary assistant and the hon. member that may be satisfactory; but so far as other hon. members in the house are concerned, I should like to know where we stand.

Topic:   WAR ASSETS
Subtopic:   MOTORCYCLES DECLARED SURPLUS BY DEPARTMENT OP NATIONAL DEFENCE
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LIB

George James McIlraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. McILRAITH:

I might explain to the house that several of the answers have been given already, and that they will be found in the last number of the proceedings of the committee on war expenditures and economies, which has not yet been printed. I cannot say whether the questions asked by the hon. member for Peterborough West are in that category.

As to the other point raised, I should think it is really a. matter of law and parliamentary procedure. I should not want to give an opinion, but it would strike me that once the report of a committee has been tabled in the House of Commons there would be no further objection to the raising of questions when the orders of the day are called, in the ordinary way.

Topic:   WAR ASSETS
Subtopic:   MOTORCYCLES DECLARED SURPLUS BY DEPARTMENT OP NATIONAL DEFENCE
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Veterans Affairs; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE:

That is right. I would ask that the house now revert to motions.

Topic:   WAR ASSETS
Subtopic:   MOTORCYCLES DECLARED SURPLUS BY DEPARTMENT OP NATIONAL DEFENCE
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SOLDIER SETTLERS

REGULATIONS EXTENDING PERIOD TO APPLY FOR DEBT REDUCTIONS


The order having been called for resuming the adjourned debate on the motion of Mr. Lalonde:


LIB

Walter Adam Tucker (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. W. A. TUCKER (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I table regulations extending to December 31, 1946, the period in which certain settlers under the Soldier Settlement Act may apply for debt reductions. This comes under order in council P.C. 166/3368 of August 8, 1946.

Topic:   SOLDIER SETTLERS
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS EXTENDING PERIOD TO APPLY FOR DEBT REDUCTIONS
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CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. WRIGHT:

A point has been raised by the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs. Are the soldier settlers being notified of the extension of this date?

Topic:   SOLDIER SETTLERS
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS EXTENDING PERIOD TO APPLY FOR DEBT REDUCTIONS
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I am sorry to interrupt the hon. member, but the item to resume the adjourned debate has been called and read. Then the parliamentary assistant presented his report. I do not think we can go back.

Topic:   SOLDIER SETTLERS
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS EXTENDING PERIOD TO APPLY FOR DEBT REDUCTIONS
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

May I suggest that the order was called prior to the question raised

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Industrial Relations

by the bon. member for Peel (Mr. Graydon). I heard the Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Mackenzie) call the order for motions at that time. If latitude was given in one instance, I suggest it should be given in the other.

Topic:   SOLDIER SETTLERS
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS EXTENDING PERIOD TO APPLY FOR DEBT REDUCTIONS
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LIB

Walter Adam Tucker (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. TUCKER:

The answer is yes-those

affected will be.

Topic:   SOLDIER SETTLERS
Subtopic:   REGULATIONS EXTENDING PERIOD TO APPLY FOR DEBT REDUCTIONS
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INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE


The house resumed from Tuesday, August 20, consideration of the motion of Mr. Lalonde for concurrence in the second report of the standing committee on industrial relations.


LIB

Paul-Émile Côté

Liberal

Mr. PAUL EMILE COTE (Verdun):

Mr. Speaker, both parties to a dispute may make use of the privilege contained in this report, and request the Minister of Labour to proceed to the taking of a vote, either before or after the strike is in progress. I made some brief comments before the adjournment last night with regard to the interest which the worker and his union will find in the implementation of this recommendation. Inasmuch as he is affected by this section of the report, the employer will feel more protected against what he may term, at times, the autocracy of union officers.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. There is so much noise in the chamber that it is extremely difficult to hear the hon. member.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE
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LIB

Paul-Émile Côté

Liberal

Mr. COTE (Verdun):

A measure such as this will give him the privilege of asking the Minister of Labour to proceed to the taking of a vote. No doubt the expression of opinion thus obtained from the men at a time when the dispute is in progress will go a long way toward bringing the parties together.

I am inclined to the belief that such a procedure would have avoided several strikes in the past, and in all probability had it been adopted in due time we would not have known any dislocation in the steel industry. This recommendation in the report will prove beneficial as to the consumer's rights in matters of industrial relations. The consumer is vitally interested in the production of this country. No one more than a minister of the crown responsible to parliament has the authority to represent him and safeguard his interests.

If a dislocation of production is threatened the Minister of Labour is empowered to proceed to a vote among the men affected, to determine what their views are on any particular phase of the conflict.

[Mr. Coldwell.J

Another important feature is this recommendation :

(a) That the proposed dominion-provincial labour conference be called at the earliest possible moment to draft a labour code within the limits of the Canadian constitution and with a view to establishing machinery for the prevention of dislocations in industry.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

The hon. member who is speaking is making so much noise that we cannot hear those who are holding meetings down here. You might call order, Mr. Speaker.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE
Permalink
LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have done so twice since the opening of this sitting. I would ask hon. members who have problems to discuss more important than that which is being discussed in the house to use the lobby.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE
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LIB

Paul-Émile Côté

Liberal

Mr. COTE (Verdun):

I submit, Mr. Speaker, that this is a very reasonable approach to the problem of peacetime industrial relations, if one recalls the experience which we have had during the war yeaTS, and on the other hand the exigencies of the days that lie ahead.

Among others we had, during the war, order in council P.C. 1003, better known as the national labour code, which came into effect March 20, 1944. It had arisen from a consultation with the provinces, and with the national presidents of the Canadian Congress of Labour, the Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, the national syndicates and the railway brotherhoods. Its purpose and effect *was to clarify the rights of the workers and of the employers, to make collective bargaining obligatory, to impose penalties against interference with employees' union activities, and to eliminate the necessity of striking for union recognition. It may be that this code did not bring all the good results which were expected at first, but it remains that it has contributed to a great extent to improvement of the relations between management and labour, to better substantially the lot of the workers, and to increase our war production to the high level which it has known.

The committee must be supported in its recommendation that a dominion-provincial labour conference be called at the earliest possible moment. It is suggested, and properly so, that the federal government take the initiative of calling this conference together. Who else could do so with as much authority? I do not see any serious reason why any province should not accept such an invitation spontaneously, and should not come here with an open mind to discuss the problem of industrial relations in each province and put together the experiences whioh they have had in their respective sections of the country within the past few years.

Industrial Relations

Why put the emphasis on the diversity of the conditions which prevails across the country? I agree that they must be taken into serious account in the study of any problem of national significance. Why not rather put together all that the provinces have in common, either as to doctrine or as to experience, and set up a common basis for the enactment of labour legislation which will take care of the minimum requirements for the promotion of industrial peace in this country?

Similar conferences should thereafter be held regularly with a view to keeping these preliminary agreements on the level of actual exigencies.

When I recall the founding of the international labour organization after the first great war and the priceless services it has rendered since in the promotion of social justice in all the countries of the world, I do not see why a closer association of our provincial governments could not achieve the same end within this country. The international labour organization held until 1939 twenty-five sessions and adopted sixty-seven conventions and sixty-six recommendations. The conventions have secured nearly nine hundred formal ratifications by governments, and dealt with hours of work; holidays with pay; regulation of conditions of work of women; protection of child workers; prevention of and compensation for industrial accidents; insurance against unemployment, sickness, old age and death; apprenticeship and training for employment; colonial labour problems; living and working conditions of seamen at sea and ashore. What the international labour office has done and still can do by mutual agreement between the nations of the world for the promotion of social justice and the establishment of a better understanding, it seems obvious to me, Mr. Speaker, that our country can do, within its boundaries, by closer consultation with the provinces.

The report before the house contains recommendations which, if they are translated into legislation, will constitute an important milestone in the improvement of our labour legislation. Our country has already done much in this field, under the leadership of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), who has devoted his whole career to that great cause. We can do more, and I hope that we shall succeed, with the cooperation of all parties concerned.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERATION OF SECOND REPORT OF STANDING COMMITTEE-MOTION FOR CONCURRENCE
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August 21, 1946