July 30, 1946

UNITED NATIONS

PARIS PEACE CONFERENCE-POWERS OF SMALL NATIONS CANADA'S STATUS


On the orders of the day: Mr. JEAN-FRANQOIS POULIOT (Temis-couata): Mr. Speaker, before the orders of the day are called perhaps I may be allowed to trespass upon the exclusive extraterritoriality of the hon. member for Peel (Mr. Graydon). I see in the morning paper that a representative of a British dominion has demanded in Paris that the small nations be allowed greater power. I should like to know if Canada, a sister dominion, is still a small nation or a middle power.


LIB

James Allison Glen (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. GLEN:

Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   PARIS PEACE CONFERENCE-POWERS OF SMALL NATIONS CANADA'S STATUS
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IND

Jean-François Pouliot

Independent Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

The question is a reasonable one. I want to know if Canada is a small nation or a middle power, and why and when it occurred.

Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Minister of Justice): I think the hon. member knows Canada as well as any of us, and he will have to arrive at his own opinion as to what class she is in.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   PARIS PEACE CONFERENCE-POWERS OF SMALL NATIONS CANADA'S STATUS
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IND

Jean-François Pouliot

Independent Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

My opinion is that Canada is not a small nation.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   PARIS PEACE CONFERENCE-POWERS OF SMALL NATIONS CANADA'S STATUS
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS


On the orders of the day:


PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Peel):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to direct a question to the Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs. I note that in answer to a question raised in the United Kingdom House of Commons yesterday the Minister of State, Mr. Noel Baker, said that he understood five Canadians were among the British subjects at present held by the Yugoslavian government. I desire to put to the minister the following questions: (1) Does this statement coincide with the information possessed by the Canadian government? (2) What are the names of the Canadians so held? (3) What are the reasons for such detention?(4) What steps'is the government taking to see that they are released?

Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Acting Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, I shall have to take the hon. member's question as a notice and see if there is information available upon which proper answers could be based.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   CANADIANS HELD BY GOVERNMENT OF YUGOSLAVIA
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TOMAHAWK IRON MINE

REFERENCE TO STATEMENT IN "CANADIAN MINING REPORTER"


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Allison Glen (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. GLEN (Minister of Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, the 'hon. member,

for Peel (Mr. Graydon) asked a question of me on Friday last regarding a report in the Canadian Mining Reporter dealing with the Tomahawk Iron Mines Limited. I have a reply here which is very lengthy and with the consent of the house I would ask permission to have it placed on Hansard as an answer to the question.

In the July 26 issue of the Canadian Mining Reporter, serious charges are made against certain officials of the mines and geology branch in connection with work performed and reports made for Tomahawk Iron Mines Limited.

At the request of Mr. C. F. Edwards of that company, the bureau of mines conducted concentration tests on a five-ton sample of their ore to determine if a high grade (99 per cent) metallic iron powder could be prepared on a commercial scale. The results obtained were not encouraging with respect to the production of such a high-grade product and were so reported. It was explained to Mr. Edwards that a commercially acceptable iron powder could be prepared, though this would not command the high price aimed at by him. We have no reason to doubt the ability or good faith of the officers concerned with these tests.

At the request of Tomahawk Iron Mines Limited, Doctor T. L. Tanton, a geologist on the staff of the geological survey, spent several days examining the magnetite occurrences on the Tomahawk property and subsequently submitted a report which he concluded by expressing the opinion that no body of iron ore of economic importance had been revealed. Doctor Tanton has been the geological survey specialist on iron ores for some years and the department has had no reason to question his ability or integrity.

The article in the Mining Reporter lists seven specific questions, and I shall read, for the benefit of the house, these questions and my answers to them:

Answers to questions asked by the Canadian Mining Reporter of the Hon. J. A. Glen in its issue of July 26, 1946, in regard to the mines and geology branch and Tomahawk Iron Mines Limited:

1. Question: What is Doctor T. L. Tanton's previous experience in the realm of magnetite iron geology?

Answer: Dr. Tanton's experience with iron ores dates back at least twenty years, and has

Immigration

been concerned with deposits of all types, magnetite included, and in different parts of Canada. Much of his field work during this considerable period has been devoted to the examination of iron ore both of productive properties and of various occurrences and prospects. Doctor Tan ton has served on the field staff of the geological survey since 1913. He received his undergraduate education at the university of Toronto, from which he obtained his B.A. degree in 1911 and his M.A. degree in 1912, and continued with postgraduate studies in geology at the university of Wisconsin, under such internationally known iron experts as Professor C. K. Leith, eventually securing his doctorate degree in geology in 1915.

2. Question: Has the bureau of mines any recognized magnetite iron expert on the staff of its geological survey? If so, what is the name of the expert and what is his experience?

Answer: The geological survey is not part of the bureau of mines but of the bureau of geology and topography. These two bureaus are the main components of the mines and geology branch of this department. The recognized magnetite iron expert on the staff of the geological survey is Doctor Tanton and his experience and qualifications have been given above.

3. Question: Are the bureau's ore dressing laboratories suitably equipped for the efficient concentration and examination of magnetite?

Answer: Yes.

4. Question: If so, why did they fail to produce a concentrate purged of impurities in as high degree as was done under Professor Lord's supervision at Queen's?

Answer: We have no information as to Professor Lord's report nor the technique he followed.

5. Question: If not, why did the bureau's laboratory staff at Ottawa presume to issue the damaging report which they released on this iron concentrate?

Answer: The report issued (No. 1775) was the result of carefully prepared tests on the basis of a tonnage mill operation. The results indicated that a 99 per cent metallic iron powder (which is considered the requirement for a high-grade iron powder) could not be produced, owing to the fact that the magnetite concentrate contained unreducible non-ferrous matter and that 100 per cent reduction is not experienced in an iron reduction process.

The conclusion in 'the report referred only to "high-grade" 99 per cent plus iron powder.

I am advised that no complaint has ever been received from Mr. Edwards or Tomahawk Iron Mines regarding the contents of these reports, but that on the contrary Mr. Edwards wrote as follows in a letter dated February 8, 1945:

"I would like to take this occasion of very sincerely thanking you and all the staff for your work and effort expended on the concentration of our magnetite to such a high degree of purity and for your very comprehensive and complete report on same. I can assure you that our appreciation of the efforts of the bureau of mines in our regard is very deep."

Again on March 31, 1945, Mr. Edwards wrote

in part as follows:

"Thanking you in anticipation of your cooperation in this matter and again extending heartfelt thanks for your invaluable work done on the concentration of our ore."

6. Question: What person or persons in the bureau of mines "leaked" the damaging aspects of the Tanton and the ore dressing laboratory reports in advance of release to the public to the Northern Miner, enabling that newspaper to publish statements damaging to the company on what they "understood" the report would contain when released?

Answer: The geological examination and report on the property and the ore dressing work on the bulk sample W'ere both done free of charge. In such cases the mines and geology branch reserves the right to make such distribution of reports as it sees fit. In this case copies of the reports were sent to Mr. C. F. Edwards of Tomahawk Iron Mines shortly after their completion and to Ontario government officials, as is our usual practice. Some time later in the spring of 1945 it was found that Tomahawk Iron Mines Limited was issuing what was considered misleading advertising in that it was quoting sections from the bureau of mines report which were favourable to its operations and omitting other parts of a contrary character. Because the manner in which this report was being utilized was unfair to the investing public it was decided that the company had forfeited any claim for confidential treatment of the results and the reports were released on authority of the director of the mines and geology branch. Mr. Edwards was advised of the reason for their release. Subsequently the Ontario securities commission saw fit to make a full investigation of Tomahawrk Iron Mines Limited and to cancel its registration certificate.

7. Question: If, as stated, by W. B. Timm, director of the mines and geology branch of the bureau, in a recent letter to a director of the company, his office "is organized to assist in the development of the mining and metallurgical industries," vdiat instructions are issued to staff members relating to external dealings in confidential material?

Answer: All members of the staff of the mines and geology branch are required to take the oath of office and allegiance on joining the public service. The first oath deals specifically writh the fact that confidential information shall not be released. Confidential reports are released only on the authority of the chief, bureau of mines, or the director, mines and geology branch.

In concluding, I should like to say that the mines and geology branch is organized to assist in the development of the mining and metallurgical industries of Canada and endeavours to the best of its ability to fulfil that function.

Topic:   TOMAHAWK IRON MINE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO STATEMENT IN "CANADIAN MINING REPORTER"
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IMMIGRATION

WIVES AND FIANCEES OF SERVICE PERSONNEL- TRAN SPORT ATION TO CANADA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Allison Glen (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. GLEN (Minister of Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the hon. member for Peterborough West (Mr. Fraser)

Wheat-Harvest Expenses

asked if the transportation to Canada from Holland and Belgium of the wives and fiancees of ex-service men had been held up because the immigration branch had not officers over there, and if these wives and fiancees will now be given priority.

The movement of dependents of service personnel is wholly within the jurisdiction of the Department of National Defence. The immigration officers have nothing to do with their transportation. The fiancees are not entitled to any transportation priority. As a matter of fact there is no transportation at the present time to have them brought here.

As to inspectional facilities on the continent, I am dealing now with the governments of countries where we wish to place our inspee-tional facilities, and, as I stated a little while ago, we expect within a very_ short time to have these inspectional facilities established.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   WIVES AND FIANCEES OF SERVICE PERSONNEL- TRAN SPORT ATION TO CANADA
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PC

Gordon Knapman Fraser

Progressive Conservative

Mr. G. K. FRASER (Peterborough West):

May I ask if these wives and fiancees will not have priority in transportation over the Poles? That is the question I wished particularly to ask.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   WIVES AND FIANCEES OF SERVICE PERSONNEL- TRAN SPORT ATION TO CANADA
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LIB

James Allison Glen (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. GLEN:

The Acting Prime Minister, in replying to the hon. gentleman's question yesterday, stated that his understanding was that these Poles were being brought here under arrangement with the United Kingdom government. There is no question of priority for the Poles; the wives will continue to have the priority they have always had.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   WIVES AND FIANCEES OF SERVICE PERSONNEL- TRAN SPORT ATION TO CANADA
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PC

Agar Rodney Adamson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. RODNEY ADAMSON (York West):

The minister said wives and fiancees. That is an enlargement, a good enlargement, is it not, on the rule?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   WIVES AND FIANCEES OF SERVICE PERSONNEL- TRAN SPORT ATION TO CANADA
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July 30, 1946