July 22, 1946

SC

Charles Edward Johnston

Social Credit

Mr. JOHNSTON:

They tell me in Calgary that there is absolutely no oak flooring coming in at all, and there has not been any for nearly a year.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

Will my hon. friend tell me where oak flooring is produced in this country?

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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SC

Charles Edward Johnston

Social Credit

Mr. JOHNSTON:

I am asking the minister if that is true in the case of oak flooring?

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

Oak is imported. I do not know of any oak trees in this country.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

I have three or four questions to ask the minister. In his statement this afternoon he said on several occasions that he was trying to help private enterprise in every way possible to develop this building programme; that he relied on private enterprise primarily for the building of homes in Canada. I think in that he was quite sound, and that when this crisis is all over it will be found that the vast majority of the homes built have been built by private enterprise. But is there not a danger that the priorities in supplies as now set will greatly discourage the private builder? For example, the minister pointed out this afternoon that there is a priority for Wartime Housing Limited and I think he said also for Housing Enterprises Limited, and of course also for homes being built under the Veterans Land Act. The result of all that is that in Vancouver the private builder is under a great handicap in getting materials. There are perhaps hundreds of houses there that are not being completed because the builder cannot get the materials he requires. Is there not some way in which the priorities can be changed so that there will be a more even distribution of the supplies?

The minister said that later in the year he hoped to change these priorities so that the private builder could get more material than he is getting now. I think the present plan is working a hardship on the small builder. Take, for example, the small lumber yard. I know of several that have been closed up, practically put out of business. Whether that will be their permanent condition or not I do not know.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

Give me the names of one or two.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

I was told that by one of them when I was in Vancouver a couple of weeks ago.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The retail lumber yards have never made as much money in their history as they have in the last year. I cannot imagine why they would close down.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

If the minister checks he will find that many retail lumber yards in Vancouver are doing practically no business at all, that they are practically out of business.

On the question of priorities, I think there should be a change made if we are to bring about the result we are all after, which is more completed houses. At the present time there are hundreds of houses that are only half built.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The government gives priority to Wartime Housing Limited, to Housing Enterprises Limited and to integrated housing.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

The integrated business is a very small part.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

No, it is a very big thing. Any contractor building a group of houses can qualify for integrated housing, if he will limit the selling price of his house to a spread which the government considers fair. In return he gets a guarantee that if he cannot sell the house at the price agreed upon, the government will buy it from him. If he will accept that profit limitation, he can get priority. He must also accept the restriction that he will sell only to a veteran of the last war. If he will do that any contractor can come under the integrated housing plan and get the priorities under P.O.ll.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

How many men have done that in Canada?

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

I think between 4,000 and

5,000 houses are being built under that plan.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

By how many contractors?

Mr. HOWE. A great number of contractors. A contractor will put up perhaps twenty-five to fifty houses, and there are about 4,000 of these houses. It is a common method of operating. But of course a good many contractors will say: I will not take $300 to build a house; I want $1,000 or $1,500. If they do, they are on their own and do not get the priorities. Some of them do not like the restriction as to selling to a veteran. They want to sell to whom they like, and therefore they do not qualify. But I think the amount of material that is under priority is not sufficient to handicap greatly a man who has no priority.

Housing Act

Of course, if everybody had priority it would not be any good at all. It would be just like extending the civil service preference now applicable to veterans to everybody.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

I did not suggest that.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

No, I know my hon. friend did not, but I am simply pointing out that if everybody got priorities there would be no priorities. We are attempting to assist a class of people whose building will be most beneficial to the returned man; in other words, those who are putting up low-rental housing or housing to be sold with a profit limitation, all of which are for veterans exclusively. For these types of housing we do give a priority. They probably amount to twenty-five per cent of all the houses being built.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

Conditions may be different in different cities; I have no doubt they are, but I am sure most veterans would go to a contractor to have a home built. If they did that, they would not get the help of these priorities?

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

Not unless the contractor was under the integrated tplan.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GREEN:

I can quite understand that many contractors do not want to be tied up with all the red tape involved in dealing with governmental authority, making all these returns, having inspections, and so on. Has the minister any plan in mind for changing the priorities later this year? I think he said something to that effect this afternoon.

Topic:   NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT AS TO LOAN PROVISIONS-CENTRAL MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION
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July 22, 1946