July 22, 1946

MOTION FOR PAPERS

CORRESPONDENCE WITH FRED ROSE

CCF

William Irvine

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. IRVINE:

For a copy of all correspondence since June 1. 1946, exchanged between the Minister of Justice and Mr. Fred Rose, M.P.

Topic:   MOTION FOR PAPERS
Subtopic:   CORRESPONDENCE WITH FRED ROSE
Permalink

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

MORNING SITTINGS


Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Acting Prime Minister) moved: That on and after Tuesday, July 23. 1946, until the end of the session, the house shall meet at 11 o'clock in the morning of each sitting day and that in addition to the usual intermission at 6 o'clock p.m.. there shall be an intermission every day from 1 to 3 o'clock p.m. He said: Mr. Speaker, in proposing this motion it is not the intention of the government to force its own views upon the house, but rather to afford to hon. members an opportunity for making known whether or not they feel that the time has arrived when we should have the house sitting three times a day. There still remains a lot of work to be done. Some of the measures yet to be dealt with seem to be non-contentious. Some of the legislation has already been very carefully considered in the sittings of standing or Morning Sittings select committees and should not take up much mere of the time of the house. There is, of course, other legislation which some hon. members will require to have further debated in the house. It is apparent that no matter how many hours a day the house sits it will still be a matter not of days but of weeks before we can get through the work that remains to be done, giving it that care which it is necessary in the public interest that it should receive. The question raised by this motion is whether we should at once begin morning sittings and endeavour to give more time to the work of the house than has been given up to the present. I realize that that does not mean giving more time to the business of the session, because the committees have been sitting not only in the morning but even while the house is sitting, as we have noticed from the sparse attendance at times in the house. But a large number of hon. members have let it be known that they thought we should be apt to expedite the work of the house if we began now sitting three times a day. If it is the wish of hon. members that that be done, the adoption of this motion will provide for it. If on the other hand hon. members feel that we should still go on with two instead of three sittings a day, the government will be pleased to have those views expressed and will endeavour to have the decision made one that will appeal to the largest number of hon. members.


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, it is not clear from the resolution whether it is the government's intention to have the house sit on Wednesday evening as well.

Mr. ST. LAURENT: No; there is a special rule which deals with Wednesday evening, and I have heard strong objections voiced to taking away the Wednesday evening-not that hon. members want to use it for social purposes, but they feel that they should have a break in the middle of the week to enable them to consider what they have done in the preceding days of the week and what remains to be done on the other days so as to be in better shape to deal with it.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. BRACKEN:

If the leader of the government feels that to have the house sit in the mornings as well as in the afternoons and evenings every day except Wednesday and Saturday will expedite the business of the house, this party will offer no objection.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
?

Mr. M. J. COLD WELL@Rosetown-Biggar

Mr. Speaker, in previous sessions this resolution has been introduced at a stage when

the end of the session was pretty well in sight, but as I look over the order paper to-day and see the amount of business still to be done I realize that we are a long way from concluding the work of the session. The estimates have, I was going to say, scarcely been touched. That is not quite correct, but only two or three departments have been pretty fully considered; there remain fifteen or sixteen departments still to go into. I do not want to do anything that will delay a conclusion of the session's business, and I am not particularly opposing this motion, but I would point out that there are still a number of committees sitting and it is difficult for hon. members who are on committees to find time to attend the sittings of the house three times a day. But members of the house have been here now for a good many weeks; some who are married and have families would like to have at least one week of the summer free to enjoy it with their families, and therefore I shall not oppose the resolution.

Mr. SOLON E. LOW (Peace River): Mr. Speaker, we are ready to support the resolution, but I think it ought to be understood that the legislative programme of the government has pretty well been brought in. I should not like to think that after we start to sit mornings in addition to two other sittings a day the government might bring in new legislation every day or two. The Acting Prime Minister should give us the assurance that the legislative programme of the government is now before us.

Mr. ST. LAURENT: On that point I have nothing to add, as nothing to my knowledge has developed since the statement made by the Prime Minister in the house when he enumerated the matters still to be considered by the house.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. ANGUS MacINNIS (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, I do not want to prolong the discussion, but I feel that members have been sent here to do a job, and we are not in any more difficulties in working here than the rank and file of the people of Canada who voted for us are in pursuing their own particular vocations at home, wherever and whatever they may be. I believe there are other ways of expediting the business of the house besides rushing the members in three daily sittings. One would be for members to discipline themselves in the amount of time occupied in debate and discussion in the two sittings of the house; if we did that we would' get more work done than by sitting three times a day. Many members of the house are on committees which are now sitting three times a day. I appreciate the way in which the

Official Secrets Act

Acting Prime Minister has put this matter to the house, and while I do not want to say that I am opposed to the motion, I wish to suggest that we should be careful to discipline ourselves when we come to deal with the business before the house.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


CIVIL SERVICE

REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION ON ADMINISTRATIVE CLASSIFICATIONS


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the Acting Prime Minister if he now knows what action is proposed by the government in respect of the report of the royal commission on the public service of Canada?

Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Acting Prime Minister): The report of the royal commission on the public service was made available to the members of the government only a few hours before it was made available to the members of the house. Each one has been asked to consider it, but there has been no opportunity yet for an exchange of views upon it, and therefore I am not in a position , to make announcement of any decision.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION ON ADMINISTRATIVE CLASSIFICATIONS
Permalink

OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT

INQUIRY AS TO ACTION ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF ROYAL COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition) :

May I ask a question of the Acting Prime Minister in his capacity as Minister of Justice? I have not had an opportunity to give him notice of the question, and if he is not in a position to answer it now perhaps he will do so to-morrow. What further action is proposed by the government in respect of the recommendations and findings of the royal commission on espionage?

Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Minister of Justice): I do not think that I should be in any better position to answer the question to-morrow than I am now. The report went to the law officers of the crown. With the assistance of counsel they considered it and have already come to the conclusion that charges should be laid against five of the persons mentioned in the report. They are now considering the report and the evidence on which it is based in connection with the cases of one Doctor Shugar and one Miss Agatha Chapman, and they have not yet reported any conclusion to me upon their study.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO ACTION ON RECOMMENDATIONS OF ROYAL COMMISSION
Permalink

NEGOTIATIONS BETWEEN BRITISH AND CANADIAN GOVERNMENTS

July 22, 1946