June 21, 1946

PRIVILEGE

REFERENCE TO SPEAKER'S RULING ON AMENDMENT, JUNE 20

PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege. It is not often I do. I wish to call Your Honour's attention to what happened last night, in order to keep the record straight and right. I moved an amendment, which I had put in writing, to the resolution that was then before the chair. Standing order 47 says:

All motions shall be in writing, and seconded, before being debated or put from the Chair.

My motion was in writing and was seconded by the hon. member for High Park (Mr. McMaster). I know that my writing is not as good at it was a few days ago, but I hold it in my hand now, and it is clear enough to read. My only point is this: I wish to assert the rights and privileges of a member of parliament in moving an amendment. My amendment was to the effect that the readjustment should not take effect until after the next census in 1951 and then only after a plebiscite or referendum. My amendment was ruled out of order by Your Honour, in these words:

I am sorry, but I cannot accept the amendment moved by the hon. member. The rules state that a motion or amendment should be presented to the Chair in such a way that it can be read by the Speaker.

I submit that there is no such regulation. Standing order 47 says that the motion shall be in writing, and my motion was in writing, and was seconded, and I read it aloud to the house. Your Honour further said:

The rules are quite definite that a motion should be presented to the Chair with the name of the mover and the name of the seconder and presented in such a way that the Chair can read it to the house. Unfortunately I cannot do that in this case.

There is no such provision in our standing orders at all. It was a very simple matter to read my amendment. I had not time to have it typed. I believe that ninety-nine per cent of the members here could read it.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO SPEAKER'S RULING ON AMENDMENT, JUNE 20
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I think it is my duty to answer the hon. member. I understand perfectly well that it is the duty of the Speaker to do everything possible to help hon. members of this house, particularly when they have a motion to introduce. But I understand also that it is the duty of hon. members, if they have a motion, and especially if the motion is important, to draft it in such a way that the Speaker can present it to the house.

[Mr. Cokhvell.l

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO SPEAKER'S RULING ON AMENDMENT, JUNE 20
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PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CHURCH:

May I call Your Honour's attention to the fact that if the Speaker cannot read it, then under the standing order it should be read by the Clerk of the House and duly recorded in Votes and Proceedings, which it was not.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO SPEAKER'S RULING ON AMENDMENT, JUNE 20
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. I cannot permit any debate.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO SPEAKER'S RULING ON AMENDMENT, JUNE 20
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LABOUR CONDITIONS


seamen's STRIKE-GOVERNMENT CONTROL OF SHIPPING COMPANIES AS OF JUNE 24


LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, since it is now apparently impossible to expect the inland shipping owners and their striking crews, members of the Canadian seamen's union, to get together and effect a settlement which will stop this serious tie-up on our great lakes transportation route, the government has decided to take over the operations of 29 of the shipping companies affected, as of 9 a.m., Monday, June 24.

Captain E. S. Brand, O.B.E., R.C.N., of Ottawa, has been appointed controller of the operations of these companies. Mr. Justice S. E. Richards of Winnipeg, member of the Manitoba Court of Appeals, has been appointed an industrial disputes inquiry commissioner to conciliate the matters at issue between the two parties while the controller is in charge.

These steps have been taken by the government under order in council P.C. 2556, dated June 20, and passed under the National Emergency Transitional Powers Act. I now table a copy of the order.

I would like to say that the order has been passed on the joint recommendation of myself and my colleague, the Minister of Transport.

I want the house to know that I would have been happier if the action taken had been unnecessary but this dispute has lasted beyond all reason and is causing serious dislocation in the movement of highly essential products, grain, coal, oil and other commodities.

I would far rather see all such disputes settled by representatives of both sides sitting down together and ironing out their differences in a fair and equitable way. Since the strike began on May 24, all the conciliation machinery of the Department of Labour-and it is adequate machinery-has been utilized to bring the parties into agreement. The attitude of both sides has been the stumbling block and [DOT] that is why the government has taken the action which I have just announced.

I now table the following documents:

Labour Conditions

1. Copy of the commission appointing the Hon. Mr. Justice S. E. Richards;

2. Copy of a communication addressed to me by the national war labour board providing for the immediate introduction of the eight-hour day, three-watch system, on vessels operating on the great lakes and St. Lawrence waterways.

We hope that the operators and the employees will give 100 per cent cooperation, and we hope also that through the good offices of the commissioner a firm agreement will soon be consummated between the disputing parties so that the government control can be lifted.

The task of negotiating the terms of the contracts to take the place of the agreement which has existed heretofore between many of the companies and their employees is not going to be an easy one. However, Mr. Justice S. E. Richards, if given reasonable cooperation by the parties, will, I am sure, obtain results which will be satisfactory.

Under the order in council which I have just tabled, control is also taken of oil tankers operated by the oil companies. Most of these companies are already working on an eight-hour day by direction of the national war labour board. However, since these vessels in consequence of the strike have not been operating, it was deemed advisable in the public interest to bring them under the control order.

I would like to say a few words about the qualifications of Captain Brand for the position of controller. He holds his rank because of service in the imperial royal navy, and during the war period has been on loan to the Royal Canadian Navy with the temporary rank of captain.

Throughout the war he has been serving as naval intelligence officer and director of the trade division. For the last year he has been one of the key officers on the naval headquarters staff, and has served since July, 1942, as a member of the Canadian shipping board.

He has been selected as controller because of his long experience in naval and navigation matters and because of his administrative capacity and good judgment.

I might add, Mr. Speaker, that one of the companies involved in the dispute, the Upper Lakes and St. Lawrence Transportation Company Limited, operating one of the largest services on the lakes, consisting of twenty-seven vessels, has accepted the strike settlement formula which appears on pages 2632 and 2633 of Hansard, and pursuant to clause 1 thereof has to-day signed a supplementary memorandum of understanding with the Canadian seamen's union which provides for the practical application of the eight-hour day,

three-w!atch system. This company's vessels are now being manned and will commence to sail to-morrow.

On the orders of the day:

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CLARENCE GILLIS (Cape Breton South):

I would like to address a question to the Minister of Labour arising out of his statement a few moments ago. Perhaps I did not understand him correctly. In appointing the controller is he taking over only the ships which transport the commodities he mentions -coal, grain and oil-or are all commodities included?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

If my hon. friend would like to have a copy of the order I will see that he gets one. It is all-inclusive, with the exception of passenger transport, and I have been assured by the men's organization that there will be no interference.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
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WAR EXPENDITURES

CHANGE IN PERSONNEL OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE


Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE (Minister of Veterans Affairs) moved: That the name of Mr. Cockeram be substituted for that of Mr. Jackman on the special committee on war expenditures and economies. Motion agreed to.


PRIVATE BILL

FIRST READING-SENATE BILL


Bill No. 196, to consolidate and amend the Acts relating to La Societe des Artisans Canadiens-Frangais.-Mr. Fournier (Maison-neuve-Rosemont).


REVISION OF STANDING ORDERS


On the orders of the day:


PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

I wish to ask the leader of the government a question. I understand that the special committee on the revision of standing orders has presented its final report. When will this matter come up for consideration? This is the fifty-sixth day of the session. The chairman of the committee is not here.

Topic:   REVISION OF STANDING ORDERS
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June 21, 1946