April 17, 1946

THE EARL OF ATHLONE

REPLY TO FAREWELL ADDRESS FROM BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that the Clerk has laid on the table to-day the reply of the Right Honourable the Earl of Athlone to the joint address of farewell presented to him by the Senate and the House of Commons, as follows:

Honourable members of the Senate,

Members of the House of Commons,

I thank you most sincerely for the; kind address of farewell which you have presented to me on the occasion of my approaching retirement as governor general of the Dominion of Canada.

It is with feelings of regret that I am concluding my official relationship as the representative of His Majesty the King in this country. It has been an honour and a great privilege to have served as governor general during the most eventful and calamitous years in the history of our time. The period of the war was fraught with innumerable difficulties many of which appeared at the time to be insurmountable. But parliament and the Canadian people, by their unselfish and untiring devotion to the cause of freedom, played a major part in the victorious struggle of the united nations against the implacable enemies of democracy.

My numerous tours of this vast country have enabled me to see almost every section of Canada.

I have been a witness of the efficiency, pel-severance and courage displayed by the men and women of Canada, whether they served in ' the armed forces or were engaged in factories or in one of the numerous societies which performed such miracles of organization and effectiveness. This ready response to the call of duty was an* evidence of the loyalty of the Canadian people to His Majesty the King and to the British commonwealth of nations, of which Canada is so important a part.

I am very much pleased to record that my relations with the members of both houses have been of the happiest.

I shall not fail, on my return to England, to convey to Their Majesties the King and Queen the loyal sentiments so admirably expressed in your address. It will be my pleasure also to convey to Queen Mary your kind remembrances. Her Majesty the Queen Mother has the warmest interest in the people of this country.

I join with you in expressing the hope that Their Royal Highnesses the Princess Elizabeth and the Princess Margaret may pay a visit to Canada in the near future.

On behalf of Princess Alice I wish to convey to you Her Royal Highness' appreciation for the very kind references you have made to her in your address. These have touched us both very deeply.

TMr. Pouliot.l

We shall never forget what Canada has contributed during the past six difficult and testing years. She earned the admiration and true gratitude of all free peoples for her magnificent and munificent contribution to the victorious prosecution of the war and to the welfare and rehabilitation of the suffering peoples of the world.

In bidding you farewell, Princess Alice and I wish to assure you of our deep and abiding affection and at the same time to express our complete confidence in the continued prosperity of Canada and the maintenance of her proud position as the senior dominion of the British commonwealth of nations.

Topic:   THE EARL OF ATHLONE
Subtopic:   REPLY TO FAREWELL ADDRESS FROM BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

GREAT LAKES SEAMEN

LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

I should like to supplement the statement I made in reply to the question asked yesterday by the leader of the opposition with reference to- a threatened stoppage of work on ships operating on the great lakes, by reading a letter addressed by myself to Mr. Sullivan on April 11. The letter reads as follows:

I have your letter of April 9 and there is a necessity in my opinion to record the facts up to date -as we understand them.

You met with me on March 25 and in addition to your committee, you will recall that Messrs. MacNamara and Maclean were present. The statement of myself and officials is that it was agreed that a telegram would be sent to the parties urging that a meeting take place on April 8 which was the earliest date convenient to you.

It was further stated that the meeting could be held in the Department of Labour office at Toronto if the parties so desired and also that a conciliation officer would be available if the parties asked for him.

In accordance with this understanding telegrams were dispatched to both parties and copies of same are attached.

It does seem to me that there is no room in the wording of the telegrams for any misunderstanding.

I am still of the opinion that it would have been advisable to meet with the operators. However, your committee decided otherwise.

You, of course, will at once agree that I could not, under the circumstances, say to the operators that they had refused to meet you.

It is noted that your executive has decided to take a strike vote beginning April 15 and I suggest to you that inasmuch as the process of collective bargaining between yourselves and the ship operators has not yet been concluded, a strike vote at the moment seems to be unnecessary and cannot be said to be in accordance with the provisions of the wartime labour relations regulations, P.C. 1003, which requires the parties to a dispute to bargain in good faith one with the other.

You may be assured that the department will do its utmost to bring about a mutually satisfactory agreement between the operators and

Labour Conditions

the employees. However, the department is still convinced that the most satisfactory solution would be one brought about by collective bargaining rather than by the passing of legislation providing for an eight-hour day.

I further wish to inform you that the labour department has requested the Department of Justice to review the relative authority as between the dominion and provincial governments and, in addition, the department has arranged for the submission of an independent legal opinion on this question.

Yours sincerely,

(sgd) Humphrey Mitchell

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES SEAMEN
Sub-subtopic:   HOURS OF WORK
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PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. BRACKEN:

Has the minister considered calling these groups together in order to try to iron out this matter?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES SEAMEN
Sub-subtopic:   HOURS OF WORK
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

I have already done that. The operators are meeting on April 24 and I understand that a submission is to be made to the men's organization. It can be fairly stated that I have had some experience in labour negotiations, not only as chairman of boards of concilation but also as a negotiator for trade unions. I have never yet felt that anything is lost by negotiation. Sometimes when settlement of a dispute seems hopeless and a strike is inevitable the interested parties meet and in many instances an agreement is arrived at and work goes on unimpeded notwithstanding the difficult situation that existed.

May I give a word of advice to both sides? We have set up machinery for the settlement of disputes of this kind, and anybody who has a good case should never be afraid to come before an impartial tribunal. The machinery of the labour relations board-and I speak now from memory-has dealt with about 3,200 disputes. In only eight cases has there been a strike. I believe that is a fair average, and compared with other countries it gives an indication of the soundness of the legislation that this parliament has adopted for the settlement of disputes of this kind. I hope that good sense will be shown by both sides; that they will obey the law and use the machinery that most other organizations have used since the establishment of the code in this country.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES SEAMEN
Sub-subtopic:   HOURS OF WORK
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REFERENCE IN DEBATE TO QUESTION OF PRICES

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) :

As a matter of privilege I should like to clarify a statement which was made the other evening and upon which there have been some reports that are creating some difficulties. Most of us find it rather difficult to get any butter in these days. Following my remarks the other evening the suggestion was made that I had said there might be a

further increase in the price of butter. Naturally that would cause persons who have butter to hold it for the higher price. I just wish to state that I had no intention of making any such suggestion either to this house or to the country, and I want to emphasize that fact. What I did was suggest that already there had been an increase in the price of butter and that there might be other products in connection with which increases might be necessary, but there was no reference to butter in the latter part of the statement.

Topic:   REFERENCE IN DEBATE TO QUESTION OF PRICES
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PRIVATE BILLS

SENATE BILLS-FIRST READINGS


Bill No. 31 for the relief of Esther Irene Lind Booth-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 32 for the relief of Katie Hoffman Pinsky-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 33 for the relief of Dorothy Adams Acer McDougall-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 34 for the relief of Helen Douglas Stewart Rankin-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 35 for the relief of Olive Esther Rose Ewen-Mr. Maybank. Bill No., 36 for the relief of Andrew Prem-Das-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 38 for the relief of Reginald Wesley Titcombe-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 39 for the relief of Hilda Forsey Pearce Johnston-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 40 for the relief of Ann Low Fuller Mitchell-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 41 for the relief of Marguerita St. Catherine McKeigan Guillevin-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 42 for the relief of Bessie Goldrosen Green-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 43 for the relief of Audrey Helen Jackson Maxham Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 44 for the relief of Frank Russell Yeoman-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 45 for the relief of Florence Joy McGibbon Lafleur-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 46 for the relief of Isobel Cameron McLaggan Oswald-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 47 for the relief of John Louis Charlebois-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 49 for the relief of Georgina Hylda Swaffield McKenzie-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 50 for the relief of Dorothy Ellen Cope Kimpton-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 52 for the relief of Charles Patrick Kavanagh-Mr. Maybank, Bill No. 53 for the relief of Irene Gertrude Cariy Staley-Mr. Maybank.. Naval Service Act


PC

Wilfrid Garfield Case

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CASE:

I may be out of order, Mr. Speaker, and if so you will rule accordingly; but I propose to oppose the third reading of every divorce bill presented from the senate.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   SENATE BILLS-FIRST READINGS
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NAVAL SERVICE ACT

PROVISION FOR SEA CADET CORPS


Hon. DOUGLAS ABBOTT (Minister of National Defence for Naval Services) moved the first reading of bill No. 56 (from the senate) to amend the Naval Service Act, 1944.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   NAVAL SERVICE ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR SEA CADET CORPS
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Naval Services)

Liberal

Mr. ABBOTT:

The purpose of this

bill is to insert in the Naval Service Act a section similar to one contained in the Militia Act, by which the sea cadet corps, the naval cadets, will be authorized in the same way that the cadet corps for the army are now authorized under the Militia Act. During the war the sea cadet corps were authorized by order in council under the War Measures Act.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   NAVAL SERVICE ACT
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR SEA CADET CORPS
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ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE ACT

April 17, 1946