April 3, 1946

PRIVILEGE

OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT-EMMA WOIKIN-PRESS REPORT OF STATEMENT OF SENATOR HORNER

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I rise to a question of privilege. It has reference to a statement which is alleged to have been made by Senator Ralph Horner and which appeared in the Ottawa Evening Journal of April 2. The article is headed, "Western senator recommended Emma Woikin," and the first paragraph reads:

Mrs. Emma Woikin, one of the twelve temporary civil servants charged as a suspect in the investigation of the Russian spy network, was recommended for a government job by Senator Ralph Horner.

"Yes," the Progressive Conservative senator from Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan, to-day told the Evening Journal, "I recommended Emma Woikin-but for the char service-not as a cipher clerk in the code room of the external affairs department."

The senator, a big, bluff and frankly-spoken man, has been "a little annoyed" at the way things have worked out.

The paragraph to which I wish to refer to particularly is as follows:

"The only reason Emma Woikin found her way into a stenographic position, first at the passport office and then in the cipher division of external affairs," said the senator, "was because her father and brothers year after year have voted Liberal for Mr. Mackenzie King."

I asked the under-secretary of state for external affairs if he would give me a statement as to how Mrs. Woikin came to be employed in the Department of External Affairs, and I have the following from Mr. Robertson:

Due to the pressure of work in the passport office in the autumn of 1943. the Department of External Affairs, on September 8, 1943, requisitioned the civil service commission for three additonal clerks grade 2 and two typists grade

2. At the same time, treasury board was requested to establish temporary positions to take care of the new appointees. On September 10, 1943, Mrs. Emma Woikin, who was classified as a typist, grade 1, was assigned by the civil service commission to one of the new temporary posts as no grade 2 typist was then available.

That is the official statement on the matter. I might add that until I heard the name of Mrs. Woikin mentioned in connection with *>

the investigation now proceeding I had no knowledge of there being any person of that name, either in Prince Albert constituency or in the public service of Canada. Unlike Senator Horner I neither recommended Mrs. Woikin for a government job nor was I

Travel Abroad

requested by her or by anyone to make a recommendation on her behalf. I know nothing whatever about her appointment; it was entirely a civil service matter and procedure.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT-EMMA WOIKIN-PRESS REPORT OF STATEMENT OF SENATOR HORNER
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PRESS REPORTS REFERRING TO SPEECH OF MR. KNOWLES ON MARCH 19

CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. STANLEY KNOWLES (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege which has to do with a newspaper report making reference to a speech which I made in this House of Commons on March 19. The report appeared in yesterday's Winnipeg daily newspapers; as a matter of fact it is exactly the same in both the Free Press and the Tribune. It reports a political meeting held on Monday night at which Mr. David Graham charged, on the basis of the speech which I made on March 19, that when I was in Moscow recently I failed to present the Canadian viewpoint to the Russian people whom I met, and that I failed to assure them that they need have no fear of our western democracies. It is stated also that I had urged friendship for their spy activities and that my advocacy of understanding was a one-way proposition.

I rise to this question of privilege because it is statements of this kind that make it difficult to establish the type of relationship which we all want between yds country and the Soviet Union, and also because the facts are the very opposite of the statements made by Mr. Graliam. Not only did I in my speech urge various efforts such as the publishing in Moscow of a Canadian paper in Russian so as to interpret Canadian ways to these people, but when I was there I made the same kind of appeal I am now making here. I am now seeking to persuade the Canadian people to understand the Russians. Similarly when I was in Moscow I went to a great deal of effort to try to get the people with whom I was in conversation to understand our ways and to realize that what we really want is friendship. I shall continue my effort to achieve understanding and friendship on a mutual basis.

Topic:   PRESS REPORTS REFERRING TO SPEECH OF MR. KNOWLES ON MARCH 19
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IND

Jean-François Pouliot

Independent Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

If you had not been to Moscow you would not have risen to-day.

Topic:   PRESS REPORTS REFERRING TO SPEECH OF MR. KNOWLES ON MARCH 19
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REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

WAR EXPENDITURES


Second report of the special committee on war expenditures and economies-Mr. Isnor. /


NATIONAL FLAG


Mr. W. E. HARRIS (Grey-Bruce) presented the first report of the joint committee of the Senate and House of Commons appointed to consider and report upon a suitable design for a distinctive national flag, and moved that the report be concurred in. Motion agreed to.


TRAVEL ABROAD ABOLITION OF EXIT PERMITS-CONDITIONS AFFECTING PASSPORT CONTROL

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table order in council P.C. 1272, April 2, 1946, revoking order in council P.C. 1841 of March 10, 1942, as amended, concerning the issuance of exit permits to women, and children under the age of sixteen years, proceeding to destinations outside the western hemisphere.

I should like to say something about the order in council which I have just tabled. It removes a form of travel restriction which has been in existence since March 10, 1942. Under the regulation that was introduced at that time, and which has been amended on several occasions since, the movement of women, and children under the age of sixteen, to destinations outside the western hemisphere has been limited by the necessity of their securing an exit permit before being permitted to leave Canada. As I mentioned on Friday last, the government is anxious to relax war-time controls wherever possible, and in view of the gradual improvement in travel conditions it has been decided to abolish the requirement of an exit permit immediately.

The result of the present order in council is that, subject to the existing rules of passport control exercised by the Department of External Affairs, women and children residing in Canada are free to make their own travel arrangements without first obtaining an exit permit from the immigration branch of the Department of Mines and Resources.

I wish, however, to emphasize that, although the improvement on general travel conditions has made it possible to remove the exit permit restrictions, this step should not be taken as an indication that the strain on transportation facilities to Europe and the far east has ceased to exist. Moreover, as the Minister of Mines and Resources mentioned in his statement on Monday last, there are severe difficulties in connection with travel from Europe to this country, and these necessarily affect any plans for travel from Canada that involve a later return trip back to Canada. The transportation of Canadian servicemen and their dependents from the United Kingdom and the continent to this country is

Atomic Energy

being granted the highest priority in the allocation of west-bound shipping space. This movement will require a very large .percentage of available passenger accommodation for many months to come, and the government desires to warn persons intending to travel to the United Kingdom and Europe during 1946 that no assurance can be given of return transportation until the needs of the repatriation programme have been filled. It is further pointed out that a very large waiting list has developed in the United Kingdom of persons who are not at present eligible for westbound shipping passage. These applicants, which number in the thousands, will be accommodated first, and temporary visitors to the United Kingdom and the continent will of course be required to take their places on the waiting list. As far as can be foreseen, this will unfortunately involve very long delays.

So far as passport control is concerned, I have already mentioned that certain types of administrative control on .passport endorsements are being exercised by the Department of External Affairs. These have been necessitated by the limited housing, food and transportation facilities in Europe and the far east, and by the desire of the government to restrict non-essential movement from Canada to the countries where conditions are particularly serious as a result of the war. The past few months have been marked by a gradual improvement in these conditions, and I am able to state that the question of passport control is at present under review.

Topic:   TRAVEL ABROAD ABOLITION OF EXIT PERMITS-CONDITIONS AFFECTING PASSPORT CONTROL
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ATOMIC ENERGY

CANADIAN REPRESENTATION AT OPERATION CROSSROAD, BIKINI ATOLL

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the hon. member for Fraser Valley (Mr. Cruiek-shank) made mention of a question of which he had sent me notice and which I said I would reply to to-day. With the permission of the house I will now read the question and give the reply. His question was:

In view of the fact that Canada is one of the three partners in the development of atomic energy, and that the United States has made provision for 120 senators and congressmen to attend Operation Crossroad at Bikini Atoll, will the Prime Minister tell the house how many Canadian senators and members of parliament will be sent to represent Canada's interest?

The answer is: I understand that the United States government had invited a small congressional committee of less than ten senators and congressmen to attend the operation which

it was proposed to have held at Bikini Atoll. As the hon. member knows, this operation has been postponed sine die. The operation was to be entirely sponsored by the UnitedNStates government, ^nd invitations were therefore issued by them. We had received an indication that some Canadian observers would be welcome. It has not been decided who would be selected for this mission.

Topic:   ATOMIC ENERGY
Subtopic:   CANADIAN REPRESENTATION AT OPERATION CROSSROAD, BIKINI ATOLL
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


PRAIRIE PROVINCES AIRPORTS

CCF

Mr. McKAY:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What airports have been disposed of by the

Department of National Defence for Air in each of the following provinces (a) Alberta; (b) Saskatchewan; (c) Manitoba? _

2. What disposition has been made of building equipment and landing fields at each of the following .points in Saskatchewan (a) Estevan; (b) Weyburn; (c) Assiniboia; (d) Mossbank; (e) Moose Jaw?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRAIRIE PROVINCES AIRPORTS
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April 3, 1946