March 22, 1946

SC
LIB

Maurice Lalonde

Liberal

Mr. LALONDE:

I say this, in a spirit of goodwill to my hon. friend, that his group in my province is trying to be more nationalist. than the Bloc Populaire. More than that, it is robing itself in a religious propaganda, is distributing pictures of the Virgin, and I think it went so far as to make propaganda with a prayer of the Social Credjt party. It would be a good thing if my hon. friend the ' leader of the party would say something to Mr. Even, the leader of the party in Quebec, so that the whole party might be united in its doctrines throughout Canada. Otherwise we shall not know what to believe-somebody is telling us lies-for the Social Credit party in this chamber has one theory about making a loan to Great Britain and their friends outside wage a campaign against it.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
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SC
LIB

Maurice Lalonde

Liberal

Mr. LALONDE:

But I am speaking to my hon. friend as the leader of a so-called party, not personally, and as a matter of fact, Mr. Speaker, I am fed up with seeing so many political parties divided up into as many parcels as there are provinces in the dominion. But on our side we are all united and the Liberal party .was the only national party that went into the last election. I say this in all good friendship to my hon. friend.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, that loan to England has a meaning which will have to be carefully pondered. We shall have to make sure, when examining the proposal in the light of the documents that will be communicated to us, that it is a premium against unemployment and that, if we do not make funds available to those who wish to purchase the goods that will be produced in Canada, our people will before long suffer from unemployment.

Mr. Speaker, I shall use the last few minutes at my disposal to discuss the matter of espionage which, in my province, has given rise to much criticism in some quarters. I have heard my good friend the hon. member for Quebec South (Mr. Power) and the hon. member for Lake Centre (Mr. Diefenbaker) wax eloquent on the subject of the magna charts. I aip respectful of traditions but there is no man-made constitution in this world which does not grow obsolete with the years. At times, it has to be transformed, to be adapted to the needs of the day. I realize that the magna charta is an expression of principles, but the manner in which those principles should be applied is quite another matter.

Who are those that disregard the magna charta? It is the British themselves who have refused to release Doctor May on bail. Why hide behind the screen of legal technicalities in order to arrest those who have betrayed their country? We must bear in mind that treason is the vilest form of crime. Suppose that some of our own citizens were caught spying in Russia; do you think that they would have a chance of escaping by being allowed their freedom on bail? No, gentlemen, they would face the firing squad within 24 hours.

I commend the government for its action, and I hope that if the accused are found guilty, the punishment will fit the crime.

Mr. Speaker, in concluding I wish to offer a few suggestions to my honourable friend, the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Fournier). I know that he is cool-headed and that he will not get over-excited.

I live in a district which depends on three main industries for its livelihood: tourists, farming and forestry. Mr. Speaker, you have probably visited the northern hills and admired the majesty of the Laurentian scenery. By Laurentian scenery, I mean our mountains and our lakes. I am sure anyone who has been there looks upon our part of the country as a tourists' paradise.

Other federal and provincial governments have encouraged the tourist industry; that is why I urgently beg the federal government to vote large sums of money in order to encourage travel in the northern part of the province of Quebec, and in the parts of our country where such an asset may be developed. In my district, the population relies to a great extent on the tourist trade and you have no idea how prosperous it could be if the federal government would only grant certain sums of money for the construction of roads to the best fishing spots in the whole world.

The government could stimulate the tourist trade by establishing a sort of travel bureau to make more widely know the beauties of our region. As a help to tourists, maybe the government could also, at the next dominion-provincial conference, establish in Quebec some of those schools for tourists' guides, as may be found elsewhere. There is a great need for them in our province. Outsiders who visit us should be taken in hand by people able to oook fish, build a hut, handle a canoe, shoot rapids, and in short ensure to the tourists all the excitement, the thrills of that great sport.

There is another programme that could be carried out by the dominion government if unemployment were to recur. Let us not forget Mr. Speaker, that our forest industry in the province of Quebec will, within twenty-five years, be in a precarious situation, if we do not plant at once thousands of trees to replace those which have been felled by lumber companies.

I am informed that the companies are willing to co-operate closely with the government in the planting of millions of trees, so that, in some twenty-five years, a new crop may keep the lumbermen busy.

Further remarks would be warranted. However, I notice that my time is nearly up. I have drawn, those matters to the attention of the house and the government in the hope that they may be of some use.

I am offering those suggestions in good faith, convinced that I have done my duty. I know that the government of our country is desirous

Grain

of preventing an economic disaster such as that which followed the first great war, and that under the wise leadership of the hon. ministers of the present cabinet, I am sure that our people, despite the unavoidable dislocation of the post-war period, will soon find their normal balance and enter upon the road to progress.

On motion of Mr. Mackenzie the house adjourned at 9.50 p.m.

Monday March 25, 1946.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
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March 22, 1946