March 14, 1946

OFFICIAL REPORT

SECOND SESSION-TWENTIETH PARLIAMENT 10 GEORGE VI, 1946 VOLUME I, 1946 COMPRISING THE PERIOD FROM THE FOURTEENTH DAY OF MARCH, 1946. TO THE SECOND DAY OF MAY, 1946, INCLUSIVE BEING VOLUME CCXLIX FOR THE PERIOD 1875-1946 INDEX ISSUED IN A SEPARATE VOLUME OTTAWA


EDMOND CLOUTIER, C.M.G., B.A.. L.Pli., PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 1947



^ousie of Commons Befjates



Thursday, March 14, 1946.


SECOND SESSION-TWENTIETH PARLIAMENT-OPENING


The parliament which had been prorogued on the eighteenth day of December, 1945, met this day at Ottawa, for the dispatch of business. Mr. Speaker read a communication from the Governor General's secretary, announcing that His Excellency the Governor General would proceed to the Senate chamber at three p.m. on this day, for the purpose of formally opening the session of the dominion parliament. A piessage was delivered by Charles H. Larose, Esquire, Acting Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, as follows: Mr. Speaker, His Excellency the Governor General desires the immediate attendance of this honourable house in the chamber of the honourable the Senate. Accordingly the house went up to the Senate chamber. And the house having returned to the Commons chamber:


OATHS OF OFFICE


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved for leave to introduce bill No. 1, respecting the administration of oaths of office. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Governor General this day in the Senate chamber, His Excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses of parliament. To prevent mistakes, I have obtained a copy, which is as follows:

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

It is just over six months since Canada emerged from six long years of war. The turmoil which has followed in the wake of war 63260-1

has created' new problems for governments in all parts of the globe. The world is full of unrest. Hunger, privation and suffering, have become the lot of millions. Other millions are homeless, many of them in exile. The problems which face the statesmen of every nation are formidable indeed.

It is only in the light of the world situation that all our problems can be seen in true perspective. The future of our own and of every country depends upon success in the task of world reconstruction, and the establishment of an enduring peace. Many of the measures you will be called upon to consider at the present session will be concerned with this wider aspect of human affairs.

Of world problems demanding immediate action, the most pressing is the provision of food to those peoples facing acute shortage, and, in some regions, widespread famine. The chance of a peaceful reconstruction of the world depends on food. The shortage at the present time is very great. The problem, moreover, is not only for the next few months, but also for the next few years. Unless the need is met, grave disorders, endangering peace itself, must be anticipated.

The government is seeking by all practicable means to make available for export the maximum supply of foodstuffs. Every encouragement is being given to increasing production. The gravity of the situation demands, on the part of the people of Canada, a united and wholehearted effort.

The maintenance of a high level of employment and national income is a fundamental aim of government policy. Employment and income alike are bound up with the restoration and expansion of world trade. To the productive employment of vast numbers of Canadians, export markets are essential.

The government has steadily pursued its efforts to restore former markets, to secure new markets and generally to expand peace-time exports. In pursuit of this policy, export credits, for which additional provision was made at the last session, have been extended to several of . our war-time allies.

At this session you will be asked to approve an agreement, recently concluded, for a loan to the United Kingdom which will help maintain the British market -for Canadian food products and other exports. The agreement will also contribute to the steady development of trade between the two countries, the removal of trade harriers and the free use of currencies for international trade.

While Canada, in common with all countries, continues to experience dislocations inevitable in a period of transition from war to peace, in no other country has the transition proceeded more speedily or with less friction.

-Conversion of war industries to civilian production is progressing steadily, with a minimum of industrial strife, and increased cooperation between labour and management.

Governor General's Speech

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
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Motion agreed to. Official Secrets Act


STANDING COMMITTEES

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved :

That a special committee he appointed to prepare and. report, with all convenient speed, lists of members to compose standing committees of this house under standing order 63, said committee to be composed of Messrs. Mackenzie, Ohevrier, Casselman, Johnston, -and Weir.

Topic:   STANDING COMMITTEES
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Motion agreed to.


INTERNAL ECONOMY COMMISSION


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) presented the following message from His Excellency the Governor General: The Governor General transmits to the House of Commons a certified copy of an approved minute of council appointing the Honourable Ian Mackenzie, Minister of Veterans Affairs, the Right Honourable J. L. Ilsley, Minister of Finance, the Honourable J. A. MacKinnon, Minister of Trade and Commerce, and the Right Honourable L. S. St. Laurent, Minister of Justice, to act with the Speaker of the House of Commons as commissioners for the purposes and, under the provisions of chapter 145 of the revised statutes of Canada, 1927, intituled: An Act respecting the House of Commons.


OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT

DOCUMENTS RELATING TO PROCEEDINGS OF ROYAL COMMISSION

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

No doubt the house will wish to have as early as possible the .documents relating to the proceedings of the royal commission established by order in council P.C. 411 of February 5, 1946. For the convenience of hon. members I have arranged to have these documents printed in advance of an order by the house, but I assume that the house will be agreeable to ordering copies once the documents have been tabled. The documents included in the booklet I have in my hand contain the statement, which was made by myself on February 15, 1946, with reference to the appointment of the commission to investigate alleged violations of the Official Secrets Act; text of order in council P.C. 411 of February 5, 1946, establishing the royal commission; letter of the commission counsel to the Minister of Justice of February 23, 1946; text of order in council P.C. 6444 of October 6, 1945; and the first interim report of the royal commission to His Excellency the Governor General in council, of March 2, 1946.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   DOCUMENTS RELATING TO PROCEEDINGS OF ROYAL COMMISSION
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March 14, 1946