December 7, 1945

TERMINATION OF ACTIVITIES IN OBTAINING FUNDS FOR PROSECUTION OF THE WAR

LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

I wish to announce to the house that the national war finance committee has recommended the termination of its active life. I have accepted this recommendation. It is not possible at this time to decide the nature of further campaigns for the sale of government securities which may be required in the future. It is therefore appropriate that the great organization set up to obtain funds for the successful prosecution of the war should end its career on the conclusion of its greatest achievement, the ninth victory loan. The final figures for this loan will be in excess of two billion dollars, of which amount approximately $1,200 million represents investments by individuals.

It is not my intention to outline the accomplishments of the national war finance committee in detail, but I think it is fitting that the house should take note of the end of this organization and that the record should show the names of the major organizations which contributed to its work.

As members are doubtless aware, much of the executive personnel of the national war finance committee was drawn from the ranks of the investment dealers of Canada. They

have supplied in large measure the working machinery for the operation. Other groups in the Canadian financial world have made substantial contributions. Among them, the chartered banks of Canada assumed a large burden in connection with the sale and delivery of bonds. The Life Officers Association and the Life Underwriters of Canada have also facilitated the building of a sales organization. Leaders in agricultural and labour organizations have provided advice and assistance. Among these groups appear the names of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, Canadian Congress of Labour, Trades and Labour Congress of Canada, the Canadian and Catholic Federation of Labour and the General Conference Committee of the Standard Railway Labour Organizations.

In the sales structure evolved by the national war finance committee certain special war organizations were required to meet special circumstances. The victory loan committees of the armed forces are a case in point. The results achieved by this group were a substantial element of the total' sales reported from individuals. Further, the armed forces provided important aid to public events to stimulate general public interest. Mention should also be made of the accomplishments of the civil service in organizing and promoting their internal canvasses.

Finally, the sales organization of the national war finance committee was greatly benefited by the leadership of business executives in facilitating the canvass of their employees, and in stimulating public response. The executive personnel of the Canadian Pacific Railways and the Canadian National Railways provide examples of this typ^ of leadership, which was repeated thousands of times across the country.

Although I have mentioned some of the organizations assisting in the sales operations, the accomplishments of the national war finance committee would not have been possible without the help of the Canadian publishers war finance publicity committee, a joint organization representing all publishers of Canada which has given invaluable advice and recommendations with reference to publicity. Associated with this committee, the advertising agencies of Canada have rendered expert service. The national radio committee, representing the Canadian Association of Broadcasters, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the advertising agencies of Canada, has performed a similar function in the field of broadcasting. The war services committee of the Canadian motion picture industry and its affiliated organizations in the United States

War Finance Committee

provided essential assistance in their field, both in the production and distribution of special films, and in the placing of their establishments at the disposal of the national war finance committee for public gatherings. The national film board was of major assistance in the production of special films and in respect to distribution of films, particularly in the 16-millimetre circuits. We are also indebted to the Outdoor Advertising Association and to the Canadian Street-car Advertising Company which gave their support in generous measure.

These and many other institutions and individuals gave powerful impetus to the work of the national war finance committee. I shall not attempt to name them all at this time because of the urgent affairs which claim the attention of the house. I believe, however, that the members will agree that the main credit for its success should go to the thousands of loyal workers throughout the country who have constituted plant victory loan committees or who served as chairmen of units and subunits, and in countless other assignments necessary to the success of our war financing programme. They have rendered a great service to their country. And finally I should say that the work of all these people would have been of little avail if the Canadian public had not been willing and anxious to assume their full financial responsibility for the winning of the war.

Suggestions have come to me from many quarters that suitable facilities be provided by the government for a continuing savings programme to commence next autumn when final instalments in the ninth victory loan have been paid. I should like to advise the house that t-his matter is being given careful study. In the meantime, war savings stamps and war savings certificates will continue to be available through normal channels, probably until the fall of 1946.

I do not wish to conclude without reference to the effective efforts of hundreds of voluntary workers, many of them women, on behalf of the sale of war savings stamps and certificates. The gross sales of war savings certificates before redemption since May 1940, and the unredeemed stamps still in the hands of the public, amount to the combined total of approximately $365,000,000, a substantial sum indeed to obtain from small savings over this period. School teachers have inspired thousands of school children to invest savings ! which are included in this total. War savings stamps are still being purchased steadily

through the operation of the current school savings plan. It is my intention to ask each province for their views on a continuance of this plan as a means of teaching regular savings habits to students. If they so desire, it will be continued in a form suited to the new circumstances.

But my main purpose to-day is served by announcing the cessation of the national war finance committee. I know all members of this house will join me in expressing deep appreciation of its work. It has been an important faptor in the winning of the war and in anchoring the economy against the shock of war. The results may well be an even more important influence for the future well-being of the Canadian people.

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PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I am very glad

to add my word of commendation to that already extended by the Minister of Finance (Mr. Ilsley) to the national war finance committee which the minister has announced is being discontinued. I am sure we all feel that that organization has performed an outstanding service to Canada during the last half dozen years. We are all agreed that all those associated with it, from the Minister of Finance and the chairman of the committee down, including the officials and the workers in whatever capacity, deserve the unstinted praise and thanks of this house and of the Canadian people.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

I think we can all agree with what the leader of the opposition has said. Our' thanks go out not only to those who organized the campaign, but also to the hundreds and thousands. ves, millions of Canadians who supported the campaign so overwhelmingly. I am particularly glad to note that the minister referred to the teachers in the schools. He suggests that inquiry is to be made of the departments of education with regard to the continuation of something of this kind. While the teachers willingly gave support to the war-time loans, I doubt whether it is proper and fair to ask them to continue this activity into the peace years, having regard to the burdens that they are carrying in the schools at the present time.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, in the statement which the Minister of Finance has just made to the house he was too modest to say anything about himself. I am sure that mem-

Trade Loans

bers of the house, irrespective of party, would wish to have him know how deeply we all appreciate the services which he has rendered to the country in the whole-hearted manner in which he has assumed responsibility for the conduct of the work of the war finance committee, and the supervision he has given its [DOT] efforts. I of course agree with all that the Minister of Finance has said with regard to the work of the war finance committee. I have already expressed in writing to the committee the government's appreciation. It is a pleasure indeed to realize that all members of the House of Commons are only too ready and happy to acknowledge the great services that all connected with that body have rendered.

.TRADE AND FINANCE

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UNITED STATES-UNITED KINGDOM LOANS AGREEMENT


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Finance arising out of a statement he made when the house rose at six o'clock last night in connection with the loan agreement between the United States and the United Kingdom announced yesterday. Will the minister lay on the table as soon as possible-he may or may not have it now-a copy of the official statement issued by the pfficials of the two governments?

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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, I will lay it on the table at the first opportunity.

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PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. BRACKEN:

I have one other related question. It was reported this morning that a white paper has been issued by the United States and sent to all governments with the exception of Argentina and Spain. It has to do with proposals relating to reductions of trade' barriers, building up of trade and employment, an international trade conference next year, and the establishment of an international trade organization. Will the minister lay a copy of that document on the table at the earliest opportunity?

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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

I do not think we have the white paper; we have long teletype messages which I undertook last night to lay on the table just as soon as I could get them copied.

I said early next week, and perhaps sooner;

but I shall certainly give that to the house as well as the white paper just as soon as it comes into our possession.

The house in committee of supply, Mr. Macdonald (Brantford City) in the chair.

DEPARTMENT OP AGRICULTURE Production Service:

15. Production service administration, $35,445.

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CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. WRIGHT:

These estimates were last before the committee prior to the conference held in Ottawa with regard to agricultural production for the coming year. That conference is over now and I believe certain decisions were reached with respect to production. Can the minister tell us what those decisions were? I should like particularly to have something said in regard to the production of wheat, as to whether under present world conditions we are to continue our production at the same rate or whether that production is to be increased. It was reported also to have been suggested to the various organizations represented at that conference that we should have an increase in the production of pork during the coming year, and I should like to ask the minister what steps the department is taking to bring about that increased production. It does not seem to me they are likely to get it unless some definite steps are taken toward that end. During the war years we demonstrated just what could be done with respect to increasing agricultural production in any particular branch if the government were prepared to make price concessions, and I have doubt whether we shall get any increase in the production of pork unless some change is made in government policy. I think the minister should give us a statement as to the conclusions reached at this conference.

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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) :

Last evening the hon. member

for Haldimand asked if I could have a statement prepared with regard to the findings of that conference. I have three copies of that statement, and will send one to the hon. member for Haldimand and the other to the hon. memebr for Melfort; and if I have the consent of the committee this statement might be placed upon Hansard so that every hon. member may be able to see it; it covers about two pages of foolscap.

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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Agreed.

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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The table is as follows:

Supply-Agriculture

Canadian Agricultural Programme for 1946

Unit 1945 Production 1946 Recommendation 1946 of 1945Grain and Forage Crops Wheat ac. 23,414,100 23,414,100 % 100Oats ac. 14,393.200 14,310,200 99Barley ac. 7,350,000 8,000.000 109Mixed Grain ac. 1,453,400 1,453,400 100Husking Corn ac. 237,000 350,000 148Rye ' ac. 487,100 487,100 100Summerfallow (Prairie Prov.) ac. 19,397,000 19,397.000 100Hay and Clover ac. 9,975.000 9,975,000 100Alfalfa Hay ac. 1,600,600 1,600,600 100Meat Animals (Marketings) Hogs no. 5,900.000 6,148.000 104Cattle no. 1,720,000 1,720,000 100Calves no. 800,000 900.000 112Sheep and lambs no. 1,200,000 1,100,000 92Dairy Products Milk (total) lb. 17,600.000,000 17,900,000,000 102Creamery Butter lb. 294,493.000 310.000.000 105Cheddar Cheese lb. 183,290,000 180,000,000 98Evaporated Whole Milk lb. 200,000.000 200,000,000 100Condensed Whole Milk lb. 30,000,000 30.000,000 100Whole Milk Powder lb. 15,500,000 15,500,000 100Skim Milk Powder lb. 35.000,000 35,000,004) 100Eggs and Poultry Eggs (total) doz. 395,019,000 , 378,605,000 96Poultry Meat lb. 288,179,000 288,179,000 100Fruits and Vegetables Apples bus. 7.416.000 12,500,000 169Pears, Cherries, Plums, Prunes

Peaches, Apricots, Grapes (Varying (Varying increases for 1946) increases for 1946) Strawberries, Raspberries, Loganberries Potatoes ac. (Slight increases for 1946) 507.600 523.600 103Canning peas and corn (Slight increases for 1946) Canning .tomatoes and beans

Fresh vegetables

Oilseed Crops Soybeans ac. (Slight decreases for 1946) (Slight reduction for 1946) 43,650 49,080 112Rapeseed ac. 20,400 20.400 100Sunflower Seed ac. 14,216 28.000 197Flaxseed ac. 1,059,200 1,250,000 118Other Crops Dried Beans ac. 96,400 96,400 100Dried Peas ac. 82.000 83,233 102Sugar Beets ac. 60,000 90,000 150Tobacco- Flue Cured ac. 76.880 85,000 mBurley ac. 10.185 12.500 123Cigar Leaf ac. 2.800 5,000 178Dark ac. 1.308 1.550 118Pipe ac. 2,775 2,750 99Seed Crops Alfalfa Seed lb. 6.450,000 15,000,000 233Alsike Clover Seed , lb. 2.795,000 7,000,000 250Red Clover Seed lb. 4.442.000 10.000,000 225Sweet Clover Seed . lb. 10.300.000 8.000.000 78Timothy Seed , lb. 16,040.000 15.000,000 93Brome Grass Seed . lb. 10,000,000 8.000,000 80Crested Wheat Grass Seed , lb. 1,325.000 2,000,000 151Other Grass Seeds , lb. 1.791.000 1.850,000 103Vegetable and Field Root Seeds . lb. (Decreases for 1946) Garden Pea Seed , lb. 11.170,000 18,000,000 161Miscellaneous Maple Products * gal. 1,530,000 2,730,000 178Honey . lb. 26,035,000 43,036,000 165Wool . lb. 14,600.000 13,200,000- 90Fibre Flax ac. 21.271 25,000 118

30S4

Supply-Agriculture

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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

What percentage of

that would go in powdered form?

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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

Probably I should put this whole statement on the record. It is a statement which was put before the conference the other day.

Egg production in Canada for 1945 is now estimated at 395 million dozen, the highest figure in the country's history, and exceeding the previous year by 34 million dozen. Quantities purchased by the special products board in fulfilment of the British contract totalled 90 million dozen, exceeding 1944 by 10 million dozen. Domestic use, estimated at 291 million dozen, was heavier than the 1940-44 average by 37 million dozen.

Production estimates for 1946 are based on chick hatches and sales in the 1945 season. There is now a carry-over of matured stock and anticipated early hatchings in 1946 from which fall eggs in 1946 will be produced. It is estimated that 1946 production will be 17 million dozen less than in 1945 and 18 million dozen more than in 1944. Hatches in 1945 based on approved hatchery figures were fourteen per cent under 1944. All provinces showed a decrease with the exception of Prince Edward Island, which recorded an eight per cent increase. An increase is anticipated for 1946, particularly in early hatches.

Eggs available for export in 1946, after allowing for a continued heavy domestic use, due to meat rationing, are estimated at 88 million dozen. The quantity will be approximately sufficient to fill the 1946 contract with the British ministry of food. Under this contract it is provided that the special products board will use its endeavours to provide up to 1,750,000 cases, that is 52,500,000 dozen shelled eggs, and 5,000 long tons, that is

11.200.000 pounds of dried eggs. Reduced to terms of shelled eggs the latter figure is equivalent to 1,087,000 cases; that is 1,087,000 cases of dried eggs as against 1,750,000 cases of shelled eggs, a difference of about 40 per cent. The total contract, therefore, requires 2,837,000 cases-85,110,000 dozen-shell eggs.

Shipments of shell eggs are to be made as closely as possible in accordance with the following schedule: Fresh eggs, winter and spring

900.000 cases; fresh eggs, autumn shipment

250.000 cases; storage eggs, autumn shipment

600.000 cases.

In operations under the British contract grades A large and medium offered to the special products board from September 15 to May 30 are shipped fresh in the shell or stored

for autumn shipment. Other grades through. out the entire year, and all eggs during the summer months are used for drying.

Since the inception of the British ministry contracts in 1940, up to and including 1945, a total of 267 million dozen Canadian eggs have been shipped to Britain in shell or in dried form. That is the information with regard to eggs.

To give the figure for the past year, the year we are just in, the offerings of eggs in car lots, special products board, from November 24 to October 31, almost a complete year, for the 1945 season, for exports to Britain in shell, 1,431 car lots; for conversion to powder, 2,507 car lots; for fall storage, 948 car lots; for the same date in 1944 for conversion to powder, 4,259 car lots.

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CCF

Alexander Maxwell (Max) Campbell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CAMPBELL:

Is there any floor under egg prices?

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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

This agreement which we have with Britain does set a floor.

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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. FAIR:

I am glad that the minister is getting closer and closer to those of us who sit in this corner, and I hope he continues this policy. The dominion and provincial governments are to be commended for the discussions which have been carried on recently. I hope they will realize their ambition. but mother nature may have something to say about all their plans. It does not make any difference how ambitious your plans are on paper, one night of frost or fifteen minutes of hail will destroy all your good intentions.

In order to aid nature in carrying out this programme something should be done in the way of increasing prices of the different farm commodities. The minister has told us on many occasions that at the present time we are receiving above parity prices for many of our farm products, but I should like to remind him that the period taken as a base for parity is 1926-29 when the farmers were receiving only 16-6 per cent of the national income. That is not a good enough percentage of the national income upon which to figure parity prices. If we took the prices that existed in 1915-19 as a parity base the farmers of Canada would get to work and do something worthwhile in the production of live stock, grain and other farm products. Until that is done I do not think the government can expect the farmers to get right down to business and produce as they should produce during the coming j^ear.

Take wheat for example. When the export price reached $1.55 a bushel, a ceiling rvas placed on the price, temporarily at least. By that method the farmers were expected to make enormous gifts to other countries which

Supply-A griculture

are using our wheat. Those gifts should be made by the people of Canada as a whole. The farmers of Canada should be paid the full present price. I realize that we have a floor under the price which will prevent it from dropping below $1 per bushel basis Fort William until after the end of August, 1950. But that is not good enough, because deliveries will be restricted and many of us will not be able to take advantage of the $1 per bushel basis Fort William. The government will have to revise radically its programme and do something to put the price up to where it properly belongs. We have been fooled in the past, at least some of us have, by being told that we were getting parity prices or above parity prices; I do not think that policy is going to carry out any longer. The production records show that the farmers are not doing their utmost and will not do their utmost until prices are radically raised.

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December 7, 1945