December 5, 1945

LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Mr. CLAXTON:

Family allowance cheques printed'in both French and English have been issued in the province of Quebec as follows:

(a) July

354,881(b) August

349,062(c) September

388,853(d) October

366,080(e) November

408,749

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FAMILY ALLOWANCES-PRINTING OF CHEQUES IN FRENCH
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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MacKINNON:

Month of

Ms-rch, 1938 Permanent <&

Department Temporary

No.

Agriculture 2,926

Archives 74

Auditor General 226

Chief Electoral Officer 6

Civil Service Commission 230

External Affairs 185

Finance (Main department) .... 293

Comptroller of Treasury 1,034

Gov't contracts supervision.... -

Royal Canadian Mint 115

Supt. of Bankruptcy 13

Tariff Board 20

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FAMILY ALLOWANCES-PRINTING OF CHEQUES IN FRENCH
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LOANS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT

BPC

Mr. HAMEL:

Bloc populaire canadien

1. By provinces, what is the number of loan* authorized under the National Housing Act, 1944?

2. By provinces, what is the amount of loans authorized under this Act since its coming into force?

Topic:   LOANS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
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LIB

Robert Wellington Mayhew (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. MAYHEW:

Loans

1. Prince Edward Island .. -

Nova Scotia 54

New Brunswick 21

Quebec 464

Ontario ' 2,271

Manitoba 629

Saskatchewan 92 .

Alberta 460

British Columbia 635

4,626

Amount

2. Prince Edward Island . .$ -

Nova Scotia 242,820

New Brunswick 92,000

Quebec 2,902,580

Ontario 9,945,905

Manitoba 2,742,260

Saskatchewan 393,340

Alberta 2,058,260

British Columbia 3,099,980

CIVIL SERVANTS-1938 Mr. STEPHENSON:

1. How many civil servants did the government employ in the year 1938?

2. What was the total salaries paid by the various departments for the year 1938?

Expenditure on Salaries for Fiscal Year ended March 31, 1938

Permanent & Non-E numerated GrandTemporary Classes TotalS S S5.027.231 901,415 5,928.646137.647 - 137,647422,619 - 422.61915,870 - 15,870306.345 - 306.345373.349 - 373849466.668 - 466.6681,751.260 - . 1,751.2604,794* - 4.794198.088 - 198,08827.379 - 27.37971.729 - 71.729

Questions

Month of March, 1938 Permanent &

Department Temporary-

No.

Fisheries 301

Governor General's Secretary.. 12

House of Commons 568

Insurance 54

International Joint Commission. 6

Justice 1,044

Labour (Main department) __________ 157

Dom. Unemployment Relief.. 87

Library of Parliament 25

Mines and Resources:

Departmental Administration 63

Immigration 587

Indian Affairs 1,047

Lands, Parks, Forests, Surveys

and Engineering 949

Mines and Geology 460

National Defence 1,306

National Research Council 185

National Revenue (Main Dept.) 4,523

Income Tax Division 1,261

Pensions & National Health:

Pensions 1,776

Can. Pension Commission_______ 213

Health 259

Pensions Appeal Court 12

Veterans' Assistance Comm... 28

Post Office 12,122

Privy Council 18

Public Printing and Stationery.. 635

Public Works 4,027

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 100

Secretary of State 324

Senate 143

Soldiers' Settlement Board 307

Trade and Commerce 1,607

Transport (Main Dept.) 4,725

Board of Railway Comm 91

Grand Total 44,144 *

Expenditure on Salaries for Fiscal Year ended March 31, 1938

Permanent. & N on-Enumerated GrandTemporary Classes Total$ $ $589.489 448,380 1,037,86932,715 - 32,715451,784 - 451,784123,035 - 123,03531,489 - 31,4891,624,276 - 1.624276272,061 137,863 409,924171,372 - 171.37256,636 - 56,636143,623 143.6231.060.808 31.649 1.092,4571,008,538 - 1,008,5381.757.276 1.757.2761.019.796 93.058 1.112,8541,593.259 675,497 2 268,756386,640 ' 386.6408,055.615 6247 8,061,8622,025,769 2.025,7692.639,173 2.639,173435,004 - 435.004487,930 73,540 561.47041.348 - 41,34873.796 - 73.796IS,846,427 13,228,583 32,075,01045.635 - 45.6351.155,022 - 1.155.0224.026,868 1,355.977 5.382,845140,139 2,472,595 2.612,734586:193 - 586.193152.994 - 452.994579.704 117 . 579,8213,241.125 197,733 3.438.8584,977,670 1,840.858 6.818.528243,140 186 243,32666,886,328 21,463,698 88250,026

*April-Aug.

Note-Non-enumerated classes are seasonal help and the numbers change from day to day. They are not included in the first column showing the number of employees.

A special survey of these employees was made in September, 1943. and. the number totalled 30,700.

Topic:   LOANS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT
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QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS


SERVICE PERSONNELr-CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR'S LEAVE


PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. CHURCH:

What Christmas and New Year's leave will be arranged for personnel of the armed forces, navy, army and air force, this year (a) for those now serving in Canada or adjacent territory (b) those overseas?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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SERVICE PERSONNEL-DEMOBILIZATION IN VANCOUVER

PC

Mr. PEARKES:

Progressive Conservative

1. How many men have been demobilized in Vancouver and Victoria who did not enlist in the province of British Columbia?

2. Will the Minister of National Defence refrain from demobolizing any more men in British Columbia who did not enlist in that province, or whose dependents are not now residing there, until such time as the employment situation in British Columbia is relieved?

British Import Licences

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   SERVICE PERSONNEL-DEMOBILIZATION IN VANCOUVER
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CHICOUTIMI AND ARVIDA MILITARY CAMPS

IND

Paul-Edmond Gagnon

Independent

Mr. GAGNON:

What was the total cost of the construction of military camps (a) at Chicoutimi; (b) at Ar vida ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CHICOUTIMI AND ARVIDA MILITARY CAMPS
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ST. HONORS, QUE., LANDING FIELD, ETC.

IND

Mr. GAGNON:

Independent

1. What was the total cost of the purchase and construction of the landing field, camps and equipment of every description at St. Honore, county of Chicoutimi, Quebec?

2. How long have these camps and landing field been used for military training purposes?

3. How many servicemen were stationed there in 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   ST. HONORS, QUE., LANDING FIELD, ETC.
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BRITISH IMPORT LICENCES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. MacKINNON (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to make a statement in answer to a recent question by the hon. member for Peterborough West (Mr. Eraser).

The question of the hon. member touches on a matter that has been of great concern to this government for some time and has been the subject of repeated consultation with United Kingdom representatives both here and in London. The situation with which we are now faced is one which was foreseen and one which both governments have hoped to avoid. Unfortunately, that has not been possible. It was anticipated that these questions would arise after the termination of mutual aid and lend lease and, accordingly, plans were laid for discussions with the United Kingdom to follow immediately on the conclusion of the United Kingdom-United States talks which we expected to be finished early in November.

The Washington discussions have continued much longer than was anticipated, and of necessity our talks with the United Kingdom have not yet taken place. Because of the magnitude of the problems involved, it would have been quite impossible for us to have any productive discussions with the United Kingdom until the results of the United States talks were known.

On the matter of the import policy which the United Kingdom is pursuing, I am now able to give the house a statement that we have received from the United Kingdom government:

The stringency of Britain's external financial position resulting from the war, has left the United Kingdom government with no alternative but to restrict by licence for the time being, the United Kingdom's imports of manufactured

goods. Until her industry can be reestablished, and her export trade developed to a level substantially in excess of pre-war, the United Kingdom will have an adverse balance in her overseas payments. This means that she must forgo, for the present, many articles which she would like to import. Thus, essential supplies of foodstuffs and raw materials have, for the present, to receive priority, and in the case of manufactured goods, import licences have perforce to be restricted to such goods as are urgently needed to supplement home production and quicken her economic recovery.

This, however, is an interim policy only, dictated by present necessities. As Britain's external financial position improves, there should follow a progressive relaxation in import controls. It is the aim of the United Kingdom government that this relaxation should be as rapid as possible, but it is difficult to make any forecast as to the rate of relaxation since this will depend on many factors, particularly the extent of such financial assistance as may be forthcoming from abroad, the improvement in United Kingdom exports, and the reduction in the United Kingdom's expenditure on external commitments consequent on the war. The United Kingdom government hope, however, that it may be possible to proceed to a more definite policy before very long.

In the meantime, certain Canadian firms have approached the United Kingdom government for facilities to establish production in the United Kingdom. I am informed, however, that it is not the policy of His Majesty's government in the United Kingdom to use the import licensing system to bring pressure on Canadian firms to do so.

This is the end of the statement by the British authorities. I wish briefly to supplement this statement. It is gratifying to make public . this assurance that the policy which the United Kingdom finds itself forced to adopt is an interim policy only and is subject to reconsideration in the light of changing circumstances. It is our hope that the conclusion of the Washington negotiations is not far distant, and I can assure the house that - immediately the results of those discussions are known, we shall proceed to examine these with United Kingdom representatives and discuss with them arrangements for formal discussions between the two governments which we would hope to hold shortly.

Apart altogether from the statement by the United Kingdom which I have just read, I should like very briefly to draw the attention of the house to a matter which may serve to illustrate the reluctance of British authorities to discriminate against imports from Canada and of their desire to safeguard our traditional place in the British market, in so far as present circumstances permit.

The house is aware that we have been in consultation with the British authorities on a number of important individual cases. The British austerity programme has dictated the continuation of the general policy of a four-page newspaper. But as the result of Cana-

Prince Rupert Dry Dock

dian representations that have been made, assurances have now been received from the United Kingdom that Canada will supply a fair part of the reduced British consumption of newsprint.

Other representations made resulted in the reinstatement of orders for agricultural implements which the United Kingdom authorities had cancelled some months ago. The Canadian export board of my department estimated that these cancellations alone would have amounted to more than 31,600,000. Continuing representations are being made on other matters, and I cite two cases simply to illustrate the general British attitude and their desire to cooperate as much as their circumstances permit in acceding to our representations.

Personally I do not in any way question the assurances that are given from time to time by leaders of the United Kingdom government with respect to the principles that will guide the future trading policies of Great Britain. I recognize, however, that the time which may elapse in giving them full effect is a matter of the utmost concern to individual Canadian companies that have relied heavily upon the British market, and to our own national trading position in the great British market.

I need hardly add that I realize that it is of importance that we press on as quickly as possible with our discussions with the United Kingdom authorities, having in mind that we must reach the earliest possible solution of our United Kingdom-Canada trade arrangements which are so vital to our whole trading position.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   BRITISH IMPORT LICENCES
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO POLICY OF UNITED KINGDOM GOVERNMENT
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LABOUR CONDITIONS


On the orders of the day:


December 5, 1945