December 4, 1945

RESOLUTION OF CANADIAN UKRAINIAN ASSOCIATION

RESPECTING SPEECH IN HOUSE ON SEPTEMBER 26

LIB

Walter Adam Tucker (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. W. A. TUCKER (Rosthem):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege. In this morning's Ottawa Citizen there is a headline which reads: " Score speeches by three M.P.'s on Ukrainians." The article then goes on to say:

Protesting "slanders and falsehoods" which, it claimed, are being disseminated through speeches by Walter Tucker, F. Zaplitny and A. Hlynka in the House of Commons, the Canadian Ukrainian Association has passed a resolution which states that the views expressed by these men are not those of the majority of Canadian Ukrainian people.

The article continues:

The association points out in the resolution that a body with headquarters in Winnipeg, the Canadian Ukrainian committee, is collects ing money to be used to aid "these nazi collaborationists and traitors to settle in Canada."

It goes on to say:

In the opinion of the association, the three members of parliament mentioned in the resolution, "actually speak on behalf of fascist and semi-fascist committees among the Ukrainian Canadians who have had previous connections with the nazi in Germany."

This refers to a speech which I made in this house on September 26, 1945, in reference to that subject. I have uttered no slanders and falsehoods. I merely asked that our troops have nothing to do with the forcible repatriation, into Soviet hands, of displaced Ukrainians whose only offence was that they had worked for and favoured a free Ukraine and who feared their fate if they fell into Soviet hands. I pointed out that no one knew for certain what was happening behind the iron curtain that divides Europe to-day and that if this policy were maintained we should not forcibly repatriate these people to what they claimed might be a terrible and undeserved fate.

The Canadian Ukrainian committee is headed by a distinguished Canadian clergyman. Its members are all loyal and distinguished Canadians. It supported, and the bulk of Ukrainians supported, our war effort, not only after Russia was attacked in 1941 but in the dark days of 1940, when those who followed the communist line were attacking the war as an imperialist war and doing their best to hinder our war effort. -

When I speak on behalf of this committee, representing as it does the vast bulk of Canadians of Ukrainian origin in Canada, I do not speak "on behalf of fascist and semifascist committees among Ukrainian Canadians who have had previous connections with the nazis in Germany." I deny this categorically. I say from long experience that the members of this committee are loyal and true Canadians. They have proved their loyalty. If they have sympathy with their kith and kin in Europe and seek to assist them in their misery, that does not make them pro-nazi or fascist.

Ever since I have spoken on behalf of these people I have been the victim of a slanderous smear campaign. The object is clear. It is to intimidate all public men from saying anything distasteful to the communists, no matter how true or justified it may be. I call on all responsible newspapers to study the situation and not lend themselves to these tactics in any way. I would say in conclusion it is an attempt subtly to undermine freedom of speech in Canada. It will not succeed in this free country.

Private Bills

Topic:   RESOLUTION OF CANADIAN UKRAINIAN ASSOCIATION
Subtopic:   RESPECTING SPEECH IN HOUSE ON SEPTEMBER 26
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REPORTS OF COMMITTEES


Fourth report of standing committee on banking and commerce.-Mr. Cleaver. Sixth report of the special committee on veterans affairs-Mr. Tucker.


COMMITTEE ON PRINTING-CHANGE IN PERSONNEL


Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE (Minister of Veterans Affairs) moved: That the name of Mr. Whitman be substituted for that of Mr. Brunelle on the standing committee on printing. Motion agreed to.


PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST AND SECOND READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill .No. 204 for the relief of Leopold Levesque.-Mr. McGregor. Bill No. 205 for the relief of Myrtle Elizabeth Fraser Bennett.-Mr. Rose. Bill No. 206 for the relief of Sylvia Pamela Solomon Lande.-Mr. Cleaver. Bill No. 207 for the relief of Annie Kandel Ashkanazy.-Mr. Brown. Bill No. 208 for the relief of Rose Acomsky Bloom.-Mr. Boucher. Bill No. 209 for the relief of Ethel Meakings Downs.-Mr. MacLean. Bill No. 210 for the relief of Evelyn Isabel May Ramsay Jarvis. Mr. Brown. Bill No. 211 for the relief of Arthur John Frederick Temperton, junior. Mr. Casselman. Bill No. 212 for the relief of Myrtle Ann Westover Coleman.-Mr. Rose. Bill No. 213 for the relief of Marie Gertrude Owens Conant.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 214 for the relief of Louis Humble. -Mr. Casselman. Bill No. 215 for the relief of Sarah Silver-stone Michelin.-Mr. Maybank. Bill No. 216 for the relief of Roderick Auguste Robert de Lotbiniere Harwood.-Mr. MacLean.


EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT

INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22


Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance) moved the second reading of bill No. 217, to amend the Export Credits Insurance Act. Motion agreed to, bill read the second time, and the house went into committee thereon, Mr. Macdonald (Brantford City) in the chair. On section 1-Aggregate amount of guarantees.


PC

James MacKerras Macdonnell

Progressive Conservative

Mr. MACDONNELL (Muskoka-Ontario):

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

There are powers under the Export Credits Insurance Act to make a loan or loans to the United Kingdom, but the financial limits of the government's powers are such that we do not propose to avail ourselves of the powers in that act to make a loan to the United Kingdom. We are not asking for enough money to give us the scope that we shall require. As I said yesterday, we have not discussed in any real sense a loan from Canada to the United Kingdom, the terms of the loan, the size of the loan or anything of the kind. We shall undoubtedly be discussing those terms before very long.

The only powers that we have to advance money on behalf of the United Kingdom to producers in Canada are the powers contained in section 3 of the War Appropriation Act, and we are making advances under section 3 of the War Appropriation Act at the present time. It will be understood that we owe the United Kingdom money on various accounts, and they owe us money on various accounts. These many and complicated matters are being examined and studied, but in the meantime I do not anticipate that we shall be embarrassed by the lack of any statutory power other than section 3 of the War Appropriation Act to make loans to the United Kingdom.

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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PC

James MacKerras Macdonnell

Progressive Conservative

Mr. MACDONNELL (Muskoka-Ontario):

What is the limitation on that?

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

It is the amount of the appropriations of the acts. There was a war appropriation act last spring, and there is also the War Expenditures and Demobilization Act which was passed recently. The total money which has been appropriated under these acts is something like $3,300 million, if I remember correctly, but of course a large part of that has been used up for other purposes.

Export Credits Insurance

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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PC

James MacKerras Macdonnell

Progressive Conservative

Mt. MACDONNELL (Muskoka-Ontario):

I have no desire to cause any delay this morning, but might I suggest this. It is not immediately apparent to me why we have no opportunity to discuss somewhat further the situation vis-a-vis the United Kingdom, which seems to me even more important than the one we are discussing now. Would it be satisfactory to the minister if it were understood that this matter might be brought up and perhaps some further questions asked, let us say during the estimates of the Department of Finance, or on some occasion of the kind?

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

Yes, I will agree.

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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PC

James MacKerras Macdonnell

Progressive Conservative

Mr. MACDONNELL (Muskoka-Ontario):

In the alternative, I might as well ask the minister if he will say a word further about it now. This may be the appropriate time. ILet me repeat what I said a moment ago. Does the minister not agree that the situation with regard to the United Kingdom is more important, perhaps overwhelmingly more important, than any other situation which we have? He has explained to us that it does not come to any considerable extent under this act, because although there is a small Tesidue of power under the act they do not propose to use, it there.

The minister has explained to us the situation generally under the War Appropriations Act. Frankly I have been disturbed, as I suppose everyone in this house has been disturbed, by what has been going on at Washington. The situation there is fraught with results whose importance it is hard to find words to express. I hear people talk blithely about our keeping up our national income. They speak, of the national income we have had during the war, and I sometimes wonder if the people who talk in that strain are taking into account the way that national income arose. I do not propose to take time on that. I only propose to say that for that reason I think this bill is of tremendous importance. I suppose we should bluntly face the fact that there is the possibility that we are giving this money away. Why are we giving it? because we do not dare at the present time to do anything else. We do not dare to refrain from taking measures which will temporarily help to sustain our export trade. We hope that a degree of sanity in world trade matters may emerge within. the next feiw months. Apart from humanitarian considerations, which I take for granted, we are moved by the hope that we are going to get an open door in these countries for our

trade; or, putting it a little differently, that we are staking people who will be good customers.

Topic:   EXPORT CREDITS INSURANCE ACT
Subtopic:   INCREASE IN AMOUNT OF LOANS AND VALUE OF SECURITIES HELD UNDER SECTION 22
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December 4, 1945