November 20, 1945

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

CHANGE IN PERSONNEL OF STANDING COMMITTEE


Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE (Minister of Veterans Affairs) moved: That the name of Mr. Jaenicke be substituted for that of Mr. Knowles on the committee on external affairs. . Motion agreed to.


POSTAL SERVICE

PARCELS FOR TRANSMISSION TO ITALY

LIB

Ernest Bertrand (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST BERTRAND (Postmaster General):

Up to the present, gift parcels for Italy could be sent only up to a weight limit

of four pounds to the islands of Sardinia and Sicily, as well as to the cities of Rome and Naples and Vatican City state. I am now glad to say that arrangements have just been completed under which the parcel post service to Italy has been extended to all areas excluding the provinces of Gorizia, Fiume, Trieste, Pola and Zara, but including the cities of Gorizia, Trieste and Pola. The weight limit has been extended from four pounds to eleven pounds, and instructions have already been issued to the postal service in this connection.

This parcel post service has been placed in operation under the same conditions as at present applying to parcel post services from Canada to other countries on the continent to which such services have been resumed.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   PARCELS FOR TRANSMISSION TO ITALY
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PC

George Black

Progressive Conservative

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

As to weight, is there any limit, in the composition of parcels, to the proportion comprising food and the proportion covering other things?

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   PARCELS FOR TRANSMISSION TO ITALY
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LIB

Ernest Bertrand (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. BERTRAND (Laurier):

There are

certain regulations which I am unable to indicate at-the moment. I know that there is a certain limitation on foodstuffs. As regards England, it is up to seven pounds, but I do not remember what it is .for other countries. I will get the details for the hon. member.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   PARCELS FOR TRANSMISSION TO ITALY
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THE PRIME MINISTER

EXPRESSIONS OF WELCOME ON HIS RETURN AFTER VISIT TO BRITAIN AND UNITED STATES


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Before the orders of the day are called I should like on behalf of the party I have the honour to represent, and in this respect I should like to think on behalf of the whole house, to extend to the Prime Minister a very cordial welcome home after his approximately seven weeks abroad. I am sure we have all read with interest the account of his movements overseas during this period. We are glad1 to see him back, improved in health and strength and ready again to associate with us in trying to serve Canada for the remainder of this session and in the days ahead.

If I may be permitted to do so, I should like to commend him for such part as he had to play in formulating the tripartite statement with respect to the control and use of atomic energy, and in the effort of the three democratic leaders to see that it is used for the promotion of the arts of peace rather than in the arts of destruction. May I say also that I trust his visit to Britain and to the United States has resulted in still further cementing the good relations between those two great countries and as well between our-

The Prime Minister

selves and them. As I have said', we are all pleased to see him back, and we shall look forward with interest to a statement from him giving his impressions of the international Scene as he has been permitted to view it during the last six or seven weeks.

Topic:   THE PRIME MINISTER
Subtopic:   EXPRESSIONS OF WELCOME ON HIS RETURN AFTER VISIT TO BRITAIN AND UNITED STATES
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

May I just say that in this instance the leader *f the opposition speaks on behalf of our party as well.

Mr. SOLON E. LOW (Peace River): This party also joins with the leader of the opposition in his welcome to the Prime Minister.

Topic:   THE PRIME MINISTER
Subtopic:   EXPRESSIONS OF WELCOME ON HIS RETURN AFTER VISIT TO BRITAIN AND UNITED STATES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I do thank my hon. friend the leader of the opposition most warmly for his exceedingly kind welcome so felicitously expressed, and may I at the same time thank with equal warmth the leader of the C.C.F. party and the leader of the Social Credit party for joining, as they have, and on behalf of those they represent, with the leader of the opposition in his words of welcome. I thank all hon. members for the hearty manner in which they have responded to the greetings of the leader of the opposition. It is indeed a joy to me to be back in Canada. I should like to take advantage of this first moment to renew my thanks to the members of the House of Commons for having permitted me, while the house was in session, to have the advantages which the trip I have just 'taken to England and to the United States has afforded. I should also like to express warmest thanks for the greetings which have been extended to me outside the House of Commons as well as within since my return by members of different parties. I do not know which to regard as the greater compliment, the readiness to have me leave or the welcome with which I have been .received since my return.

As my hon. friend who was leading the house mentioned last night, I think it would probably best suit the convenience of all were I to give to hon. members some account of the impressions gained in the last few weeks when we are considering the estimates of the Department of External Affairs. That may be arranged for some time in the very near future. Similarly, I think it would be best to speak also at that time on the allimportant question of atomic energy. However, I should like to avail myself immediately of the opportunity to express in the presence of my fellow members to-day the thanks which I feel I owe to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and to the British government for the opportunities which they afforded me while in Britain for

conference not only with members of the present administration but with members of the opposition and with others as well. In addition to the Prime Minister I feel particularly grateful to Lord Addison, the leader of the House of Lords and Secretary of State for the Dominions, and to Mr. Ernest Bevin, the Minister of Foreign Affairs. With these gentlemen I was privileged to have very intimate conversations on matters of general and wide interest.

I should also like to express equally warmly my appreciation of the great kindness and many courtesies extended to me by the President of the United States, Mr. Truman, by the Secretary of State, Mr. Byrnes, and other members of the administration, in the course of my visit to Washington, at the same time as that of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. I may say to my hon. friends I do believe the visit which Prime Minister Attlee and I had together at Washington was not only of great service to the three countries represented at the conferences we had with the President of the United States, but will prove to have been of real service to the world itself. Certainly I feel very strongly that the conferences in England and in Washington have helped, if such were needed at this time, to strengthen the bonds of friendship between the peoples of the British commonwealth of nations and of the United States. I am sure that nothing in this world is more needed for the preservation of peace itself than the maintenance of the relations that were so firmly established between those peoples at a time of war, and their continuation throughout the period of post-war reconstruction.

Topic:   THE PRIME MINISTER
Subtopic:   EXPRESSIONS OF WELCOME ON HIS RETURN AFTER VISIT TO BRITAIN AND UNITED STATES
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CONDITIONS IN EUROPE

FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER-PLIGHT OF CHILDREN-QUESTION OF REFUGE IN CANADA


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Gladys Grace Mae Strum

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mrs. GLADYS STRUM (Qu'Appelle):

I should like to address a question to the Minister of National Health and Welfare. I am sorry that I did not have a chance to give him notice of this question. In view of the appalling conditions prevailing in Europe, and the certainty of death from 'starvation facing millions of children there, what steps are being taken to give refuge to the children of the stricken countries and bring them to this country?

Topic:   CONDITIONS IN EUROPE
Subtopic:   FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER-PLIGHT OF CHILDREN-QUESTION OF REFUGE IN CANADA
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LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Hon. BROOKE CLAXTON (Minister of National Health and Welfare):

I do not know that the question properly falls within the scope of the ministry of National Health

Health Insurance

and Welfare. It would be a question for joint consideration by the government, and the answer will have to be given at a later day.

Topic:   CONDITIONS IN EUROPE
Subtopic:   FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER-PLIGHT OF CHILDREN-QUESTION OF REFUGE IN CANADA
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CCF

Gladys Grace Mae Strum

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mrs. STRUM:

I should like to follow it up with this question: Would the minister consider the setting up of a joint committee of both houses of parliament to consider our moral obligation to alleviate the plight of those children and find ways and means of placing as many as possible in homes in Canada?

Topic:   CONDITIONS IN EUROPE
Subtopic:   FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER-PLIGHT OF CHILDREN-QUESTION OF REFUGE IN CANADA
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November 20, 1945