October 18, 1945

SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

"Union Now".

United Nations Agreement

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. LOW:

At that time Russia was allied to nazi Germany. The idea propagated was the formation of a world federation of nations under which all countries would surrender some of the essential elements of their sovereignty to a central authority. These included control over finance, international trade and the armed' forces.

I recall that this idea was put forward in a book bearing the appealing title "Peace in our Time". Its author was James P. Warburg, son of Paul Warburg, the German international financier who played a leading role with Jacob Schiff in the centralization of the money power in the United States, and its consolidation with the highly-centralized money power of Germany. That particular group of international bankers are predominantly German in origin, stemming from the house of Rothschild in Frankfurt-on-Main. They have become the most powerful financial group in all the world, and they have consistently pursued a policy of centralization of control with the single objective of complete world domination.

It is from that group that the idea of a world federation of nations emanated. However, it was not James Warburg's book which was used as the chief instrument for putting over the idea. It was another book under the title of "Union Now", by Clarence Kirsham Streit, which elaborated in great detail on world federation union, with centralized control of finance, international trade and armed forces. The mechanism was ingeniously designed to impose a virtual world dictatorship, under the guise of democracy; which dictatorship, by its very nature, would lead step by step to an absolute world totalitarian tyranny.

The attempt to popularize that idea failed. The next move, then, was the introduction of the British and United States suggestions for a world monetary fund. The British proposals emanated from the Bank of England, while the United States proposals came from the United States treasury under Mr. Morganthau, Junior, who is likewise connected with the same group of international financiers I have already mentioned. Sir Cecil Spring-Rice has given valuable evidence on this point.

Stemming from these two financial proposals were the suggestions of a group of selfappointed "experts" who introduced, out of the blue, the prelude to the Bretton Woods conference. Then followed the conference at Bretton Woods, which adopted the general scheme proposed by the "experts", a scheme for shackling the nations of the world once more to gold under the centralized control of a specialized agency of the world security organization which this charter we are considering proposes to set up.

Now, the control of international finance is an essential requisite to world domination; but to make that domination absolute, similar control of armed forces of great strength is equally essential. It is quite significant, therefore, that the Bretton Woods conference was followed up by the Dumbarton Oaks conference at which the first step toward placing the armed forces of the world under a single authority was formulated. Then came the San Francisco conference in which all these various proposals were consolidated into a single charter. But the real authors of the charter, the men who actually drafted it, were evidently so anxious to obscure any of its dangerous and anti-democratic features behind a smoke-screen of platitudes and humanitarian phraseology that they overreached themselves. I have already shown that the profession of purpose set forth in the preamble of the charter bears no relation to the sinister purpose which one uncovers in the proposed organization itself. The organization embodies features which are flagrant violations of the most precious principles of democracy and of human justice. It is not only unworkable, but, I submit, highly dangerous. By no stretch of the imagination could it in its present form possibly serve the cause of peace and human progress.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

William Ross Macdonald (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

I must remind the hon. member that his time has expired.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. LOW:

I shall be just about three or four minutes more.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Go ahead.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

William Ross Macdonald (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

With the permission of the house.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. LOW:

I appreciate the indulgence of the house in this instance, and I will not detain it long.

There is another serious'weakness in the charter which I wdsh to point out at this time. It was by the grace of God that world conflict in arms ceased before the utter destruction of civilization itself resulted. Our nation and many others acknowledged this by setting aside days of prayer and of thanksgiving during and at the conclusion of hostilities. But I wonder if we have so early forgotten the humility which accompanied us in those dark days. It must be evident to any thinking person that world-wide peace under God requires world-wide good will. Anything we do to bring world peace for which we long, or any organization we set up to assist us in attaining this most desirable objective, must be infused with Christian

United Nations Agreement

motives, wherein the teachings of Christ maybe applied to establish world order and happiness.

The present day is witnessing in varied forms a most intense struggle between the forces of evil and darkness arrayed on one side and the legions of righteousness and good will on the other. We must never lose sight of that for one moment. It has always been my conviction, Mr. Speaker, that when men think they can get along without God's guidance, they have come to the point where they are most vulnerable to the influences of unrighteous and evil forces.

This charter was man-made, and it flouts the very idea of the dependence of men on their Creator by its failure to include in any one of its clauses or provisions a single reference to the need of the hand of Almighty God to guide and direct the nations of the world in their search for peace. There will be no peace until the nations of the earth repent and get down on their knees earnestly and humbly acknowledging the need of divine guidance in all their affairs.

I wish to make it abundantly clear that the Social Credit group is not opposed to the principle of international cooperation. We recognize the need of some form of international organization for mutual protection against aggression. In fact, we strongly favour such cooperative international understanding. However, our approach to the problem is from the realistic point of view, that it is not possible to get such cooperation until the main causes of international friction are removed. Until that is done, there can be little hope for peace in the world, because these deep-rooted causes of friction prevent international good will based upon Christian motives.

The first problem which confronts all the nations, therefore, is the removal of the main causes of international friction, which are two in number. In the first place, each country must put its own house in order and remove the causes of internal friction. Peace has its roots in the well-being of every human family in the land. What kind of contribution can Canada make to world peace so long as we have internal strife within our own country -the rest of Canada against Quebec, or Quebec against the rest of Canada, the east versus the west, recurring labour disputes and intense prejudices and hatreds? What contribution to world peace can the United States make while she is torn by internal strife over the negro problem, conflicting labour groups, the clash of fractional and sectional interests? So long as internal strife is so much a feature

fMr. Low.]

of national social structures, so long will war remain a feature of the world social structure. And down that road lies the annihilation of the human race.

The only manner in which internal strife can be eliminated is by the reorganization of the national life to ensure security with the fullest possible measure of freedom for all men in that nation, irrespective of race, creed, colour or language.

The second dominant cause of war is the insane obsession on the part of each nation,, necessitated by the defects of our monetary system, that it must export all it can and import as little as possible. This fight for foreign markets is simply organized economic war, which can lead only to all of the horrors of armed military war.

Having set our own house in order, and having led the way by a real and honest-demonstration of the right kind of international trade relationships, namely, exchange of goods for goods, balancing of exports with imports, then, I submit, our Canadian people will be ready to take their place in a world community of nations and to make their honest influence felt for great good. When the various nations of the world have, through like action, indicated and established their integrity, then, I submit, the world will be ready for full, successful participation in a democratic world assembly, the parliament of man.

When Anthony Eden visited Canada in 1943 he spoke in this very chamber on April 1, in the course of which he made the following remarkable statement:

I am going to ask hon. members of these two houses if for a moment now they will cast their minds back to the early days of the war, because I should like to tell them that there is in the minds of all my countrymen one recollection above all which stands out from those days. We can never forget that when we went to war to redeem our pledged word

a fact that I like to keep present in my mind-when we did that, you stood with us. Four self-governing dominions of the British empire took their stand in partnership with us. That event is part of recorded history. No man can change it. It is an event of which the British commonwealth will always be, I trust, supremely proud. This close association in the hour of danger was the outward expression of the inner meaning of the British commonwealth.

Let us for a moment consider its significance, because I am of the opinion that we do not talk about ourselves enough. What did it mean? It meant that a number of self-governing communities scattered all over the world realized as clearly as we did, who were very much closer to the scene, the peril that beset not only them but mankind. Understanding full well that the threat to one was a threat to all, they rallied unanimously in defence of the common cause. That event was all the more remarkable when we reflect that the citizens of this commonwealth

United Nations Agreement

are not all of one common stock. Here in Canada are millions of French descent, whilst in South Africa the majority is in fact of Hutch origin. Moreover, India and the colonial territories of the empire have from the first day taken their place at our side. When, therefore, all is measured, there has been no more striking, no more inspiring episode in human history than this free and spontaneous action by .all the peoples of the British empire.

Do hon. members think that such spontaneous, concerted action on the part of free, sovereign nations as referred to by Mr. Eden is worth preserving in a world such as this? Do hon. members believe that the will to concerted spontaneity of action in the common interest can be preserved and protected by a patent attempt to bring about peace through centralization of power maintained by force? We in this group are anxious to preserve the spirit which has drawn members of the commonwealth together time after time throughout our history, a spirit of concerted action which has saved the world on more than one occasion. It is because of the leading and glorious role which Canada has played within the commonwealth that I believe Canada should now take the lead in questioning the whole basis of the united nations charter. Britain is in no position to do so, and no other nation is in so good a position for the task as is Canada.

This, Mr. Speaker, is no narrow political issue. It is a matter which concerns the lives and happiness of hundreds of millions of human beings. It is a matter upon which the whole future of this country, yes, of the whole world, depends. I have placed the facte as I see them before the house, and in doing so I have discharged my duty. This group cannot give its unqualified support to the charter in its present form. Yet we earnestly desire to see a charter brought forward which will ensure genuine international cooperation, and which will hold out genuine promise of peace in the world. We want to see a charter which gives complete and unhampered opportunity for the kind of spontaneous and voluntary concerted action, under God, in the common cause that has been at once the foremost character, and the major secret of the endurance of the British empire through the storms of the centuries.

I have repeatedly stated that if the people know the truth the people generally will take the right action. I am satisfied, however, that the people of this country do not know the situation with respect to the united nations charter. They have not had an opportunity of learning; and in order that they may have a full opportunity of finding out for themselves, and thereafter, of directing this house on what its duty should be, in the light of all circumstances, I move an amendment, seconded by the hon. member for Lethbridge (Mr. Blackmore):

That the resolution be amended (a) by inserting after the word "that" where it first appears in the resolution the word "before"; and (b) by inserting after the figures "1945" the words: "it is desirable that an educational campaign for a period of one month be conducted throughout Canada by allotting on the transcanada network of the CBC abundant, free, and equal time to those in this house who oppose the charter in its present form, and those who support it, so that the Canadian people may have the fullest possible opportunity to study the proposal, and in the light of their matured judgment, to express their will as a guide to the houses of parliament."

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

May I ask the hon.

member a question? He made it appear that the delegates at San Francisco were unmindful of the influence of religion. He is aware, of course, that all the religions of the world were represented, each referring to its Divine Being in different terms. Is he aware that on the first Sunday of the meeting of the united nations at San Francisco great religious demonstrations were held by all the great religious denominations, praying for divine guidance in the drafting of this charter; so that while the charter is silent, the delegates who were there cannot be accused of neglecting to recognize the great Supreme Authority of the universe.

Mr. LOW; Mr. Speaker, I submit that the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar could not possibly read into what I said any imputation of the kind which he has suggested.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. LOW:

I am answering the question.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

You, are quite right.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

William Ross Macdonald (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

Order. The

hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar asked for permission to ask a question. He has asked the question, and the hon. member for Peace River may answer.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. LOW:

I am perfectly aware that the delegates who went from Canada, and perhaps those who went from other countries-I do not know so much about them as I do about our delegates-are men who are devout, and I give them credit for being sincere Christians. I do not question that for a moment; but what I did say, sir, and what I did try to emphasize, is that there is, either in the charter itself or- and this is the more serious, it seems to me- in the wording of the resolution that is before the house, no mention whatever of our dependence upon divine guidance.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

Explain that awav.

United Nations Agreement

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

Roch Pinard

Liberal

Mr. ROCH PINARD (Chambly-Rouville):

Mr. Speaker, it is quite right to assert that this critical period in, the history of humanity through which we are now passing requires from public men a deeper sense of responsibility. A violent and sharp evolution is now shaking the peoples of the world, and through all that a tired world is trying to find its way; therefore, all decisions must be considered with shrewdness and perspicacity, and hasty decisions might provoke fatal consequences. Our country in particular, whose noble and generous efforts have excited the admiration of the whole civilized world finds itself now at extremely important cross-roads. The wise and1 level-headed men who presided over our administration have deserved and have gained the people's support, and that is proof of sound judgment on the part of the people. It is also a manifestation of confidence in our government.

The reputation of our country has improved and grown for many reasons, and it is now the duty of Canada to gather the fruits of its toils, efforts and sacrifices. It will be to the glory of this government to have enabled the nation to take its place with confidence and determination on the international scene. The reputation of our country has been strengthened and ennobled in the blood of her sons on the battlefields of the whole world. The name of Canada has become symbolic everywhere, in Europe as in the Pacific, on the beaches of Dieppe, as in Italy, in Holland as in Germany, with the words, courage, bravery and heroism.

I respectfully bow before the graves of those who died, and their ashes should remain burning in the soul of the Canadian nation. To those who fought in all theatres of war this grateful country owes and offers the help that their toils have earned and that their sacrifices have deserved. It is also of great importance not to forget those who have been stricken by sorrow, the families mourning those who are absent; and I am grateful to our government which did not forget them and which has supplied them with due assistance by means of generous and effective legislation.

Yes, the name of Canada has been exalted in the sacrifices of her sons, in the blood of her heroes and also in the sorrows of the afflicted at home. So far as those who stayed in the country are concerned, if their effort was more discreet, it has all the same contributed to a great extent to the good renown of our nation.

The tools manufactured by our workers, the products cultivated by our farmers, and also the supplies our government has been distributing and is still distributing to the hungry nations of Europe-all this, I say, has added rMr. Blackmore.]

to the prestige and the high reputation of Canada. It is also owing to the united efforts and toils of all that our country has become an important power which may, with authority, have its voice heard in the international councils. This proud and powerful voice of our nation was heard with eloquent conviction in the deliberations which were held at San Francisco during the months of April, May and June last, and which ended with the signature of the charter of the united nations on June 26.

During the last session an important debate was held on 'the question of sending a Canadian delegation to the conference of the united nations, and there were voices in this house which raised protests against the participation of Canada in those historic discussions. Some of those voices expressed the opinion that conferences of that kind were always useless and that the decisions arrived at could be of no profit or advantage whatsoever to the Canadian community; and yet, Mr. Speaker, these were the same voices which on many occasions uttered strong protests against the colonial remains which we still have in this country. They were the same voices which wanted a greater recognition of our privileges as a free nation in the British commonwealth.

What a strange attitude! When it is given to our country to set foot in the field of world discussions; when it is so urgent to participate freely in those noble deliberations for the preparation of the future of our nation; when, finally, all the other nations are uniting in a common effort to find remedies for the evils of the world, our country, which has devoted all its energies to assure the maintenance of those privileges and rights so dear to every free man, would stay in the background and refuse to express her opinions! How strange indeed that it should be the same persons who denounced our participation in the conflict, who now deny our country the right to work for the prevention of these wars whose horrors and evils they so gladly talk about!

I am proud not to belong to such a group, for, in spite of many mistakes and errors, in spite of the interests and intrigues which constantly try to influence its decisions and judgments, in spite of prejudices and weaknesses, I still have faith in international justice, and above all I believe in free discussion .of the numerous problems of international relations because it is indispensable to good human intercourse.

Moreover, I am proud that our government deemed it expedient to send to San Francisco her front-rank men, men of good will like our

United Nations Agreement

Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), the Minister of Justice (Mr. St. Laurent) and other leaders of our political parties or groups in order to have our country known better by the other united nations, and in order that the latter may know what price our country attaches to the full exercise of her rights as a free and independent nation.

Finally, as I said in the beginning of my remarks, every public man must, in this critical period of our national life, face his responsibilities and accept them in all their sense and severity.

We have all learned once more what war means, what it entails in misery, sorrow and ruin; therefore it is our most sacred duty to work to our utmost in order to prevent any such conflict in the future. A French writer, Georges Scelle, professor of law at the university of Paris, wrote in 1940, in the magazine La paix par le Droit:

Each of us has within himself a portion of the possibilities for peace: he is free to desire it or to be indifferent. The present generation is accountable for the blood of the generations to come.

Yes, Mr. Speaker, it is a fact, a peremptory and decisive fact; the present generation is accountable for the blood of the generations to come. I believe if Canada were not using every effort to participate in a practical and constructive way in the work done for the improvement of international relations and for the prevention of future wars, the present leaders of our nation and all of us, members of this house, would bear before future generations terrible responsibilities for our negligence and selfishness.

I did not have the pleasure to attend, as a member of parliament, the debate of last session to which I referred, but I am glad the great majority of our nation's representatives voted in favour of participation in the united nations conference. All men of good will have followed with attention the progress of those historical deliberations. The discussion appeared at times to be bitter enough, as was explained by the Minister of Justice, but all the nations taking part finally agreed on basic principles and also on common measures to be enforced in order to prepare the peace organization.

At San Francisco the world certainly made great headway and great studies, and these peace preliminaries will be of great benefit for the improvement of relations between nations and individuals.

These international reunions are not new; indeed, they have taken place at all times and date back to the middle ages. Every important conflict was followed by meetings of the same kind, and in spite of criticism some bore excellent fruits, even if sometimes they proved unsuccessful.

On the other hand, certain great minds, scientists, economists or philosophers have thrown light on our agitated world and their ideas have guided discussions and debates, and the orientation of peace movements. At the beginning of the eighteenth century, long before any international conference, we discover the names of men of great ability associated with projects to promote the peaceful solution of the problems between individuals and nations. Those of us who are interested in those important works and writings have found, I am sure, the names of l'Abbe de St-Pierre, Jeremy Bentham and Immanuel Kant.

There is a fundamental principle expressed in their writings which struck me particularly. This principle I found clearly defined in a peace project dating as far back as the year 1795, and without its application it seems to me no peace movement can hope to succeed. This idea constitutes a truth of first importance upon which the following centuries truly conferred a really prophetic sense.

In this project is stated as an absolutely essential condition to the progressive discussions for the quest and safeguarding of peace, that in each and every nation wishing to participate in discussions, the form of government be democratic. In other words, the contention was that a nation's voice should be always the voice of all her citizens. Well, Mr. Speaker, does it not strike everybody that if such a principle had been adopted by all the important nations, many if not all important conflicts which have steeped in blood and ruin the European continent and the whole world would have been avoided?

Nearly all wars indeed have been the result of the pride and ambition of a single man or group, and history has proven that wars were seldom attributed to a whole nation's initiative. At all times the memories of war have been closely associated with the names of great warriors like those of Alexander, Caesar or Napoleon, but I do not believe anyone can assert that general conflicts have ever been launched by the people's will, for at all times human groups have hated and despised war. That dreadful calamity has always been the immediate result of narrow nationalism and of the unrestrained ambitions of usurpers or tyrants.

In 1795, when the world was given that historical advice, the European situation was tense and critical indeed. France had just crushed monarchy, and in the blood of revo-

United Nations Agreement

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

I wonder if the hon.

member would permit a question just before six o'clock. I think it is only fair that he give permission, because a few minutes ago he made some remarks which were really in the nature of innuendoes respecting certain hon. members who sat in parliament last spring. He said either too much or too little. I would ask the hon. member if he would prepare, during the recess this evening, the documented evidence to support the statement that he made regarding what was said by hon. members who sat in the house last spring.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

Roch Pinard

Liberal

Mr. PINARD:

I was not at all referring

to hon. members in the Social Credit group. I was referring to three or four members of parliament at that time, of whom there are only a few in the house, who voted against Canadian participation in the resolution then under discussion which had for its purpose the sending of a delegation to San Francisco. That is what I referred to; but let me say-

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I do not like to interrupt the hon. member, but it is six o'clock.

At six o'clock the house took recess.

After Recess

The house resumed at eight o'clock.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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LIB

Roch Pinard

Liberal

Mr. PINARD:

Mr. Speaker, before the

recess I was dealing with certain means of rendering more profitable, in my opinion, the charter of the united nations. As a last means offered to the world in its quest for peace there is the frightening progress of modem science in the service of war, which creates a salutary threat to those who would be tempted to throw the world into another war.

I have listened very carefully to all the speeches that have been made on the resolution before the house, especially the speech made this afternoon by the hon. member for Peace River (Mr. Low). I am surprised that he personally has decided with the members of his party to vote against the resolution.

Topic:   ORDER INCREASING ENTITLEMENT OF HOUSEHOLDER-POSSIBILITY OP SUPPLYING REQUIREMENTS
Subtopic:   UNITED NATIONS
Sub-subtopic:   APPROVAL OF AGREEMENT SIGNED AT SAN FRANCISCO, JUNE 2-5, 1945
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October 18, 1945