September 13, 1945

LABOUR CONDITIONS

STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Labour. What action is being taken by the government to help bring about an early settlement of the labour dispute at the Ford Motor company plant at Windsor, Ontario?

Ford Motor Plant Strike

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
Permalink
LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, in reply ^to my hon. friend may I say the strike was called only yesterday. I understand the report of the board of conciliation reached the workers yesterday morning. I have had no word from the company as to its attitude toward the report of the board, but I do think at this time the history of events might be placed on the record, so that everyone may understand what we have done to prevent this stoppage of work in the city of Windsor.

In the early years of the war the Ford Motor Company operated without any signed contract between its employees and the company. Commencing in the fall of 1941 demands developed for an agreement between the company and its employees.

In November, 1941, the Department of Labour arranged a vote of the employees under an agreement with the company that it would make a contract with its employees if the majority of them indicated by the vote that it was their desire that the company do so.

As a result of these negotiations an agreement was completed between the company and its employees of January 15, 1942. Disputes have arisen since the time of the agreement and the department has succeeded in bringing about agreement with comparatively little actual stoppage of work.

Negotiations have been going on for the past eighteen months looking to a new agreement. With the permission of the house I would ask that the document I hold in my hand be placed on Hansard, and taken as read. It is lengthy, and sets out the details of the negotiations which have taken place.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
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?

Mr. COLD WELL@

I think it should be read.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

If the house would like to have it read, I shall read it.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
Permalink
?

Mr. COLD WELL@

Read it.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

Very well. The following is a summary of conciliation in industrial relations between the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited, and local 200, U.A.W.-C.I.O., Windsor, Ontario, showing action taken by the Minister of Labour of Canada and the Minister of Labour of Ontario.

November, 1941: Consent vote conducted by Department of Labour of Canada to determine bargaining agency.

January 15, 1942: Agreement completed

between company and local 200 after negotiations following vote.

November, 1942: Employees went on strike to enforce claim that 37 female employees were performing work previously performed by men and were therefore entitled to equal pay. After conciliation by Hon. Peter Heenan, Minister of Labour of Ontario, Hon. C. P. McTague was appointed umpire and decision handed down December 31, 1942. He found that clerical work performed by men was incidental to other duties not required of women. Claim of union not upheld.

December 31, 1942: Memorandum to agreement concluded, amending agreement of January 15, 1942.

January 11, 1944: Memorandum of agreement concluded, further amending agreement of January 15, 1942.

April, 1944: Dispute with regard to suspension of certain stewards, followed by stoppage of work by all employees, and termination of agreement by company in consequence. Minister of Labour of Canada sent conciliation officers to Windsor. Parties accepted a proposal of the wartime labour relations board on April 28, which provided for certification of bargaining representatives and negotiation of new agreement. Work resumed May 1.

May 2, 1944: Workers again went on strike because of objections of union to grievance procedure as determined by the national wartime labour relations board. Mr. Justice O'Connor (in his capacity as a supreme court judge), Mr. M. M. Maclean, industrial relations officer, and Mr. B. Wilson, one of his assistants, went to Windsor. Work finally resumed May 11 on the understanding that board would clarify the grievance procedure, which was done on May 12.

May, 1944, to June, 1945: Mr. Louis Fine, Ontario Department of Labour, acted as umpire under terms of grievance procedure established by board. Company has refused to implement one decision of umpire, which refusal is now the subject of an application by the union to the Ontario labour relations board for leave to prosecute.

May, 1944 to January, 1945: Negotiations for new agreement continued as provided in settlement of wartime labour relations board, dated April 28, 1944.

January 22, 1945: Ontario labour relations board asked Minister of Labour to appoint conciliation officer under section 12 of P.C. 1003, one of the parties having advised the Ontario board that negotiations had continued for more than thirty days and that there appeared no likelihood of concluding an agreement.

Ford Motor Plant Strike

January 29, 1945: Minister of Labour

appointed Mr. Louis Fine, of Toronto, to confer with the p'arties and to attempt to effect an agreement.

March 28, 1945: Mr. Fine reported to Minister of Labour that in his opinion an agreement was impossible and the situation was very complicated and difficult.

April 5, 1945: Application by company to wartime labour relations board (national) for interpretation of the termination clause (section 14) of April 28, 1944, settlement. Arbitration committee appointed by the board ruled that certain sections of the settlement which preserved the individual rights of the employees could be terminated only at the expiration of one year on two months' notice by either party. All other clauses of the agreement would terminate at the expiration of fourteen days after a conciliation board reported to the Minister of Labour.

April 18, 1945: Minister of Labour appointed Hon. Mr. Justice S. E. Richards, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, an industrial disputes inquiry commission, under order in council P.C. 4020, to confer with the parties, endeavour to effect an agreement and report his findings and recommendations to the minister.

August 3, 1945: Hon. Mr. Justice Richards submitted to Minister of Labour an interim report recommending that the present agreement be allowed to stand until the end of the present year and that negotiations for a new agreement be entered into afresh on October 15, 1945. .

August 16, 1945: Mr. Justice Richards' report transmitted to parties.

August 21, 1945: Reported that local 200 U.A.W.-C.I.O. had rejected the recommendation of Mr. Justice Richards.

August 28, 1945: Mr. Justice Richards recommended to the Minister of Labour that in view of the rejection of the recommendations in his interim report a conciliation board should be immediately established.

August 30, 1945: The Minister of Labour established a conciliation board.

September 1, 1945: The union nominated Mr. Bora Laskin of Toronto as a member of the board.

September 1, 1945: The company nominated Mr. S. L. Springsteen, K.C., of Windsor, as a member of the board.

September 1, 1945: In the absence of a joint recommendation from the two board members, the Minister of Labour appointed the Honourable Mr. Justice G. B. O'Connor of the Supreme Court of Alberta as third member and chairman of the board.

Mr. Justice O'Connor and other members of the board conducted hearings in Windsor last week.

The board submitted its report on September 11, and it was released to employees and employers on the same date.

The board in its report expresses the opinion that the main issues preventing an agreement between the company and its employees are the questions of "union shop" and "check off." The union asks for the inclusion of both these provisions. The company, on the other hand, is fully determined that there shall not be a condition of employment with the company that a person must be, become, or remain, a member in good standing in the union.

The report of the board of conciliation records the belief that the Minister of Labour of Canada as well as the Minister of Labour of Ontario from time to time have exhausted every possible governmental effort to compromise the difficulties between the parties and to keep the Ford plant in operation.

There were a number of issues brought before the board of conciliation other than those of "union shop" and "check-off."

In dealing with "union shop" and "check-off" the chairman and the representative of the employees recommended that the parties agree to a voluntary check-off irrevocable during the term of the contract as a solution of the present difficulty. In addition, the representative of the employees recommended that a provision for maintenance of membership be coupled with a provision for "check-off."

The representative of the company on the board of conciliation did not concur in either recommendation.

My department has one of its conciliators on the spot at this time to keep the minister and the government informed of developments.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OP EMPLOYEES AT WINDSOR PLANT OP THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY
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HOUSING

CONVERSION OF MILITARY CAMPS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT PREMISES TO MEET EMERGENCY


On the orders of the day:


PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Peel):

I

should like to direct a question to the Minister of Finance. In view of the pressing shortage of shelter for Canadian families, which is likely to become extremely acute during the coming winter, has the government given consideration to the conversion of suitable military camps and other premises owned by the government into temporary housing accommodation to meet this emergency?

Housing

Topic:   HOUSING
Subtopic:   CONVERSION OF MILITARY CAMPS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT PREMISES TO MEET EMERGENCY
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

Yes, consideration has been given to the utilization of camps and other premises owned by the government. I think it was two months ago or thereabouts that the Minister of Reconstruction (Mr. Howe) and I met a delegation of mayors from the larger cities of Canada and made an offer on behalf of the government to make available such premises as we thought could be given up by the military authorities and where they would be suitable. Since that time certain premises have been made available to the municipalities, and others are under discussion at the present time. There is an officer in the Department of Reconstruction who is working on this class of problem, and,perhaps the Minister of Reconstruction would like to add something to what I have said. In any event I can say positively from my own knowledge that the matter has been given extensive consideration and necessary arrangements have been set up to deal with the situations that arise.

Topic:   HOUSING
Subtopic:   CONVERSION OF MILITARY CAMPS AND OTHER GOVERNMENT PREMISES TO MEET EMERGENCY
Permalink

QUESTION AS TO FREEZING OF PLUMBING MATERIALS IN PARTLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSES


On the orders of the day:


PC

Joseph Henry Harris

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. H. HARRIS (Danforth):

I would ask the hon. Minister of Finance if it would be possible to hold back the plumbing freezing order now being invoked on houses partly constructed, until such time as these houses are completed, inasmuch as the majority of them are to be occupied by returned soldiers?

Topic:   QUESTION AS TO FREEZING OF PLUMBING MATERIALS IN PARTLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSES
Permalink
LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

I do not think that is in my department.

Topic:   QUESTION AS TO FREEZING OF PLUMBING MATERIALS IN PARTLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSES
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PC

Joseph Henry Harris

Progressive Conservative

Mr. HARRIS (Danforth):

Perhaps the

Minister of Reconstruction and Supply can tell us.

Topic:   QUESTION AS TO FREEZING OF PLUMBING MATERIALS IN PARTLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSES
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Reconstruction) :

I must say that I never heard of this order in connection with houses under construction.

Topic:   QUESTION AS TO FREEZING OF PLUMBING MATERIALS IN PARTLY CONSTRUCTED HOUSES
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September 13, 1945