April 12, 1945

LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. D. C. ABBOTT (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, the other day the hon. member for Lake Centre asked me to state how many men of N.R.M.A. status had proceeded to theatres of war up to the end of March. I had given figures to the end of February

Prisoners of IVar-Canadian

and I told him that I had cabled for this information, and would endeavour to give it to the house. I received a reply this morning.

Up to the end of March, 1,705 men who had claimed N.R.M.A. status when they left Canada had proceeded to theatres of war. That represents an increase of 1,467 over the 238 who had proceeded to theatres of war to the end of February. Of this 1,705, a total of 1,651 still had N.R.M.A. status when they left England. What happened to them after they got over to the theatres of war I do not know.

Perhaps I might be permitted to emphasize that these figures bear out the statement which I made to the house yesterday that ' these men are treated in exactly the same way as general service men. They take their place in the queue and proceed as reinforcements to the theatre of war as they are needed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Sub-subtopic:   N.R.M.A. MEN PROCEEDING TO THEATRES OF WAR
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PRISONERS OF WAR


On the orders of the day:


PC

Wilfrid Garfield Case

Progressive Conservative

Mr. W. GARFIELD CASE (Grey North):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to make an observation to the Prime Minister, having to do with his statement yesterday about prisoners of war. As you know, there are now appearing in the press pictures showing our prisoners of war in a very terrible condition. I have a letter from a friend who has a son who has been a prisoner of war since August, 1943. For a while they heard from him quite regularly and his letters were cheerful, but for a long time now they have not heard and these pictures are driving them almost to distraction. I should like to ask the Prime Minister if he could seek the cooperation of the press and periodicals and have them desist from publishing these pictures. I do not see where any good purpose is served by publishing them. Thousands of people whose loved ones are suffering under nazi tyranny must be undergoing terrible heartache because of these pictures. Because of what he said yesterday I know the Prime Minister is in sympathy with these people. I should like him to take this matter under advisement and seek the cooperation of the press and periodicals so that we may save these people some heartache and sorrow.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS AMONG CANADIAN PERSONNEL
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

As the hon. member has

suggested, I have every sympathy in the world with those who have relatives Overseas, in the prison camps, and who undoubtedly are faced with a critical situation. As I said

yesterday, the government is seeking to take every means possible to get correct information. However, to ask me to seek to control the press is a pretty large order. It is one I have never attempted to carry out in any form. I know my hon. friend has certain influence with the press, and perhaps after the words he has just used they will take-

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS AMONG CANADIAN PERSONNEL
Permalink
NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

His influence is a good

influence.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS AMONG CANADIAN PERSONNEL
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

After the words he has just used I am sure they will take notice. I would imagine that in a matter of this kind the press would be only too anxious to cooperate with anyone of any party.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PRISONERS OF WAR
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS AMONG CANADIAN PERSONNEL
Permalink

HOUSING


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct the attention of the Minister of Finance to the serious housing condition now existing in Toronto. For the last few days there have been lines of people in front of the office of the emergency administrator on Bay street waiting for permits in order to obtain temporary shelter when there is none available. It is only nineteen days to the first of May and these people must be taken care of. I had intended to move the adjournment of the house to discuss this matter but some time has been taken up already discussing our rules. The minister wrote me on February 20 stating that it would not be possible to build any houses in Toronto because of war and a lack of materials. The emergency shelter control has not helped things; it has simply aggravated' the housing situation in Toronto. As a rule large numbers of people would be going to the island and to the country for the summer, but if they do so these rules interfere with that exodus because it would be necessary for them to get permits when they come back to the city.

I have three or four suggestions I should like to make. First, that army and government property and that of outside commissions in or near the city be made available for temporary housing. This is necessary when many people are being thrown out on the streets on May 1. Second, that any building engineers now in the three forces be lent to-the municipalities in order to help build temporary quarters. Third, that some of the irksome housing controls governing the building and renovation and reconstruction of properties be removed. Fourth, that some labour and a

Armed Forces-Pensions

reasonable amount of used or unused building materials be made available from the war salvage administration and unused war plants, like the one at Pickering; also that there be made available some of the wooden huts now being used on the waterfront by the R.CAJF. equipment depot.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   HOUSING
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS IN TORONTO
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

My hon. friend's suggestions will receive consideration. I might say that yesterday or the day before my colleague, the Minister of Munitions and Supply (Mr. Howe) in answer to a question asked by an hon. member, indicated that the Toronto situation was being carefully considered. I understood the minister to say that he hoped to be able to make a statement within a few days.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   HOUSING
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS IN TORONTO
Permalink
NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

You cannot get houses built by sending out shelter postcards. There is enough paper being wasted as it is when there are no houses available.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   HOUSING
Sub-subtopic:   CONDITIONS IN TORONTO
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PENSIONS


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Herbert Alexander Bruce

National Government

Hon. H. A. BRUCE (Parkdale):

May I

ask the Minister of Veterans' Affairs if he is in position to state what the pension, rates will be for various disabilities suffered from wounds or sickness attributable to this war. Similar information was available to the public during the last war.

Hon. IAN A. MACKENZIE (Minister of Veterans' Affairs): My hon. friend was good enough to send me notification yesterday of his intention to ask this question. As the reply is fairly lengthy, I ask permission to table it and I will send my hon. friend a copy immediately.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PENSIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES-RATES FOR VARIOUS DISABILITIES
Permalink
NAT

Herbert Alexander Bruce

National Government

Mr. BRUCE:

Could it not be placed on

Hansard?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PENSIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES-RATES FOR VARIOUS DISABILITIES
Permalink
LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Veterans Affairs; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

It will go on Hansard.

(The statement follows:)

Disability as defined in the Pension Act means:

"The loss or lessening of the power to will or to do any normal, physical or mental act."

Disabilities result from wounds, injuries or disease. Section 24 (2) of the Act provides:

"The estimate of the extent of a disability shall be based on the instructions and a table of disabilities to be made by the commission for the guidance of physicians and surgeons making medical examinations for pension purposes."

This table of disabilities was created in 1918 on the recommendation and advice of outstanding specialists, compensation board officials and others after a close study of the assessment tables of the allied governments. The table

sets out percentages for fixed disabilities and is used as a guide only in arriving at the degree of assessment. It has been revised on several occasions and is the subject of constant study by the commission and its medical advisers.

Pension awards are subject to review from time to time and the degree of assesment is based on the degree of pensionable disablement at the time of examination. Amputation at the elbow would normally be a fixed disability whereas disabilities resulting from diseases such as bronchitis may vary from 5 to 100 per cent. For this reason it would be impossible to give the awards of pension for all cases of wounds and sickness but the following examples may meet the request of the hon. member.

Single man

Pension per month

Loss of one eye is assessed at

40 per cent $30 00

Total blindness is assessed at

100 per cent 75 00

Amputation at elbow is assessed at

70 per cent 52 50

Amputation at knee is assessed at

60 per cent 45 00

Amputation of both arms is assessed

at 100 per cent 75 00

Loss of one kidney is assessed at

15 per cent 11 25

I might add that, as the hon. member is no doubt aware, the Pension Act, section 26, provides for an addition to pension in cases of helplessness.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   PENSIONS
Sub-subtopic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES-RATES FOR VARIOUS DISABILITIES
Permalink

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY


On the orders of the day: Mr. S. II. KNOWLES (Winnipeg North Centre): Mr. Speaker, I should like to address a question to the Prime Minister, notice of which I sent to him earlier to-day. Has the Prime Minister received from the heads of certain railroad unions in Canada a request for the establishment of a royal commission to investigate the matter of the pension rights of Canadian Pacific employees who were involved in the general strike at Winnipeg in 1919? If so, will the Prime Minister indicate whether consideration will be given to this request?


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I did not receive my hon. friend's communication in time to have a search made of the departmental files, and so I am unable to say whether the trade unions have sent such a request to me. They may have. If they have, it will certainly receive consideration. My hon. friend is referring to a strike at Winnipeg in 1919 and a request for a royal commission to provide redress in the matter of pension rights. Is that it?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES INVOLVED IN 1919 STRIKE-REQUEST FOR ROYAL COMMISSION ON PENSION RIGHTS
Permalink

April 12, 1945