April 3, 1945

CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

When the house rose at six o'clock I was dealing with the question of discharge. There is another type of discharge which I think should be examined into and some latitude allowed. I refer to discharge because of misconduct. This applies to both sections of the army and air force, male and female. Any service personnel discharged because of misconduct immediately lose all the rehabilitation benefits, gratuities, et cetera. I have no objection to its being applied in that way to the habitual deserter, the man who goes absent without leave and who generally misconducts himself to such an extent that he deserves to get a discharge of that description.

I have in mind, however, boys who went into the service at the age of eighteen or nineteen, being away from home for the first time, and who commit their first infraction of the regulations as a result, perhaps, of taking a few drinks of beer. In consequence they become involved with the civil authorities and receive a sentence in the civil courts, and they are immediately discharged after two or three or even four years of good service to the country. That classification is immediately cut off.

I think there should be some latitude where the age of the person concerned might be taken into consideration, the number of times he has committed an infraction of the rules, and some compensation allowed him for the service he has rendered the country. I look at it in this way. The average civilian becoming involved with the civil courts receives a sentence and when he is released his debt to society is paid. But any service personnel committing a similar infraction of civil law, in addition to receiving the full sentence that applies to civilians is also sentenced in the form of a fine to the extent of the rehabilitation he may be losing, his gratuity, and in addition to that there is handed him a discharge certificate that reads in bold letters,

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"misconduct". Wherever such a boy or girl goes looking for employment the question is asked: "Were you in the service?" "Yes". Then, "Where is your discharge certificate?" And immediately on the production of that certificate employment is refused. I submit that we are giving these young people something they will carry with them for the rest of their natural life, a discharge that precludes the possibility of employment.

I have seen discharge certificates of two girls, just young kids, who had committed some slight infraction of military law, and I am>

thinking that the system we have to-day of employment agencies across Canada will be carried forward into the post-war period so that these young girls-and young men too- from the service, in addition to suffering the penalty imposed by military law or by the civil courts, will carry with them something that the ordinary civilian does not bear for a similar infraction. This will militate against them for the rest of their natural lives.

It is necessary in some cases, but there are extenuating circumstances and some latitude should be allowed the military authorities who are handling matters of discipline in the way I have outlined. I am not going to go further than that because I believe that the question will be given some attention. Certainly it is a terrible way to send a young girl out of the service. It is perhaps not so bad for the boy, although he is certainly getting a sentence that is not imposed upon civilians for similar infractions of law.

There is another matter I have not heard touched upon. This has to do with a forgotten section of our service. When the commonwealth air training plan was first established it was difficult to get trained personnel to give the necessary instructions in elementary flying, and I believe that schools were started across Canada, largely by commercial pilots, men who had paid for their education and had a licence to carry cm that kind of work. I understand there is a ruling that when the war is over the only people who will be allowed' to do commercial flying in Canada will be the personnel who have seen service in the air force overseas. They will have priority and that rules out completely the men who gave up their vocation in order to establish the commonwealth air training plan. I have here a brief from a group of pilots and I presume the minister and other members of the house as well have received it. I will not go into this matter to any extent, but I think the government should consider carefully the contribution which that particular classification made. The commonwealth air training plan was perhaps Canada's greatest contribution to the war, and the [DOT]Mr. Gillis.]

men who really started it off and in consequence were precluded from going overseas or engaging in the regular activities of flyers of the type they were turning out, should be given full consideration.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Veterans Affairs; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

Is my hon. friend referring to the civilian flying clubs?

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

Yes. I say, that classification should be given full consideration along with the air force who are doing the flying, because in my opinion they did an essential job at the beginning of the war, and, for that matter, all through the war. We can do nothing but sing the praises of those men for the flyers they turned out, carrying the banner of Canada in the air overseas.

There is another angle to this matter of allowances which I would bring to the attention of the minister. I mention most of these questions because I have tried to straighten them out with the department and have not been successful. There are many cases where two or three boys out of one family are in the service. The mother died some years ago, and in the case I have in mind two boys have been overseas for approximately four years. Their sister had been keeping house for them for twelve years. The home is their own and the boys were maintaining it. She tried to establish a claim for allowance but was not successful. She has no income except the assigned pay of the brothers, but the income is not sufficient to pay the taxes on the property, with the result that year by year the taxes are getting into arrears and the town threatens to sell that property.

Those boys left their jobs and they are fighting for their country and for their home. The chances are that when they come back that home will be gone for taxes and the sister, who had kept house for twelve years, may be in a boarding house somewhere.

I have tried with the dependents' allowance board to get the allowance but have not succeeded. I tried the dependents' allowance advisory committee to see if some provision could be made to protect that property, but the board ruled it out on the ground that there must be an allowance before action can be taken. There the matter stands. There are three years' taxes owing on that property. The sister cannot keep it up; the brothers arc liable to lose it and they are in the service. I think there should be some provisions whereby the dependents' allowance advisory committee could have the necessary latitude to protect the property of the boy in the service under circumstances such as I have described. That is not an isolated case; I myself have had several of them.

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I should like to say something directly to the Minister of Veterans' Affairs with respect to the hospitals that come under his department. I am going to mention Camp Hill hospital in Halifax particularly. There is an excellent hospital there. There are a lot of patients in it but the personnel of the hospital is completely inadequate. The medical staff leaves much to be desired. I go in there occasionally. I visit around. I know the personnel well and I know they are doing a good job with what they have, but from what I have seen there the hospital is completely understaffed medically. Second, the hospital itself leaves much to be desired with respect to treatment for personnel who may have serious operations. There is no place to which patients may be moved so that they can be quiet and be by themselves. Wards are large. Take an amputation case or a man with a serious abdominal operation. He is put in one of those big wards. He might as well be put in a machine shop. There is a lot of noise going on and all that kind of thing.

I suggest that small private rooms be provided in these hospitals where men who are seriously ill can be segregated and given an opportunity to rest. I believe that if the medical staff is not augmented there the two doctors who are looking after the patients will be in hospital themselves. Perhaps there was an argument two or three years ago that the medical personnel was not available. I do not think that holds good to-day because air force hospitals, army hospitals and the like are being maintained all across Canada. I think sufficient personnel can be taken from these hospitals to maintain the regular permanent establishments such as national defence hospitals will be in the future. I myself believe that these are the hospitals that should be properly staffed and every facility provided now so that they can do the job which they will have to do in the future.

I look upon the other hospitals as merely temporary establishments to take care of emergencies and the like. I believe that in so far as the regular national defence hospitals are concerned the whole matter of maintenance personnel and rehabilitation personnel necessary to implement the programme that the government has outlined such as gratuities, vocational training, out-of-work benefits, and the like, needs to be jacked up a hundred per cent. When the minister replies he will likely say that the personnel is not available. I do not believe that holds good in Nova Scotia. Before coming into the house I made a check with the national selective service offices in the area from which I come. I

found some eight hundred registered unemployed in the area. Many of them were service personnel. Many of the service personnel were good material for civil service positions. In fact some of them had applied and I believe that the personnel necessary to put the machinery in operation could be found among veterans of this war who are seeking employment.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Veterans Affairs; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

In what area is that?

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

In the Cape Breton area, on the island of Cape Breton. When one considers the position of the war in western Europe to-day one feels that one of the most immediate needs of the country is the perfecting of the personnel who are to look after demobilization; the business of rehabilitation, placing of men back in work, vocational training and the like, is the immediate problem that should be taken care of. The machinery to do that job should be perfected now instead of waiting for demobilization when there will be a lot of confusion, misunderstanding and so on.

There is another thought that I wish to leave with the minister, and it is an old) one. I refer to the problem of returned service personnel coming back to heavy industry. I had a lot of experience with this after the last war, having worked on boards, tribunals, and the like. Men are discharged with a ten per cent disability. To all intents and purposes that is their medical disability. They go back to a city where there is available employment in offices and the like and perhaps they are handicapped only to the extent of ten per cent; but if they go back to an area where there is nothing but heavy industry such as steel plants, coal mines, farming and so on, while they may have only a ten per cent medical disability, they are disabled a hundred per cent in so far as employment in those industries is concerned. They cannot take employment in heavy industries. That is what is happening in many sections of Canada. The men are returning to sections of the country where there is no employment except in the industries I have mentioned. While their disabilities are not great from the medical point of view, nevertheless they find themselves, when they go to selective service, a hundred per cent disabled, because they cannot take employment.

Another thing I would urge upon the minister is to fight with everybody in his department for the immediate establishment in Canada of the necessary vocational training schools to put the vocational training end of rehabilitation into operation. I consider the

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most important part of rehabilitation the routing of men into a school where they can take a course for employment for which they have an aptitude in order that they may be sent to something where they can be permanently rehabilitated and take their place in society. Gratuities are fine, but they last only a short time. When the gratuity is spent the man is in exactly the same position he was before he received it. It is necessary that he should have it in the first five or six months to relieve his mind and give him a chance to look around; but it is also necessary to establish these schools so that when the gratuity is spent he has grounded himself for some kind of employment. In the earlier stages they are receptive to that kind of thing. But when they drift around for five or six months it will not then be so easy to get a man back to school. If these advantages are available when they come back first they will take advantage of them. If they mill around for a few months they are likely to become discouraged and it will then not be so easy for them to do the job. I just leave these thoughts with the minister because I consider them necessary in the immediate post-war period. .

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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SC

Frederick Davis Shaw

Social Credit

Mr. F. D. SHAW (Red Deer):

There are several matters to which I should like to refer while the debate is in its present stage. I think we are all conscious of the fact that we have a great many veterans returning to Canada at the present time. We know they are all facing the problems of rehabilitation. In my part of Canada it is recognized that while many are being successfully rehabilitated there are a great many who are still encountering considerable difficulty. Members should, and I believe do, appreciate fully the magnitude of the task which is confronting not only the government but all the people of Canada. In connection with this matter I think veterans and their relatives look to parliament and to the government for guidance. In the matter of rehabilitation they are quite justified. I say, too, that they expect to see through the actions of the government and of parliament a reflection of the appreciation which I think they believe we should see in their heroic achievements.

Reference has been made during this debate to the payment of the war service gratuity in the case where the serviceman becomes a casualty. As yet no one from this group has expressed an opinion on this matter; therefore, to strengthen the hand of the minister, who I believe will fight to have the gratuity paid to the estate of the deceased service man, I should like to put our stand on record. Recently the legislative assembly of Alberta yVTr. Gillis.]

passed a resolution with respect to this matter. We endorse the resolution. It was considered purely from a non-partisan point of view. The resolution was sponsored by Mr. Williams, veterans' candidate in the provincial legislative assembly, and seconded by Mr. Ward, one of the service representatives. I should like the house to bear with me while I read this resolution, which received the unanimous endorsation of the provincial legislature: Whereas under clause 1, the War Service Grants Act, 1944, which provides for payment of war service gratuity to members of the armed services on discharge, it is set forth, that if a member of the armed services dies on service or after discharge, before he has been paid war gratuity in full, payment of gratuity or the unpaid balance thereof shall be made only to a person to whom or in respect of whom, dependents' allowance was payable on behalf of such member immediately prior to his death, And whereas a large number of men and women in the armed services have dependents to whom or in respect of whom, they are unable to have dependents' allowance established, Therefore be it resolved that we, the members of the Alberta legislature assembled here, do hereby request the dominion government to amend the said bill so as to provide for war service gratuities being paid to the estate of all members of the services who die on service or after discharge before said gratuity has been paid in full.

. Let me emphasize that this resolution was unanimously endorsed by the members of the legislative assembly of Alberta. It may have come to the attention of the minister prior to this time. [DOT]

One case comes to mind when I speak of this matter and, without mentioning any names, I think I should give one or two details in connection with it. A young lad was enabled to attend university only because his father mortgaged his business. After completing either two or three years of his university course this boy joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and later was killed overseas. The agreement with his father-understood, of course-was that upon the completion of his course he would pay back to his father the money raised through the mortgage. While overseas he did make certain payments to his father; but the long and the short of it is that after the lad died nothing could be claimed by his father, with the result that the business is still mortgaged and a real hardship has been caused. That boy's father does not look upon the gratuity as compensation for the loss of his son. Never; but I do believe that in fairness the gratuity should certainly be made part of his estate and paid to it upon the serviceman's death.

The next matter to which I should like to refer is the granting of the Memorial Cross

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to the widow or the mother of a member of the service personnel who lost his life while on duty. I understand that regulations governing this award were established by order in council P.C. 4210, dated August 27, 1940, as amended by order in council P.C. 2135, dated March 28, 1941. These regulations define a mother as follows:

"Mother" means the woman who gave birth to the sailor or soldier or airman or seaman.

Let me point out what has happened. Two cases in my constituency have come to my attention in which lads were adopted when very tiny babies and lived with their parents, so-called, for a period of twenty-five to thirty years. They then enlisted and lost their lives. Under this regulation those mothers are refused the Memorial Cross. It is not as though that cross cost very much. Those boys never knew any other mothers. They called them "mother"-; those women looked upon the boys as their sons, and it is easy to understand their feelings when they receive word that because they did not give birth to those boys they are not entitled to the Memorial Cross.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie (Minister of Veterans Affairs; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver Centre):

What is the number of the amending order in council?

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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SC

Frederick Davis Shaw

Social Credit

Mr. SHAW:

It is P.C. 2135 of March 28, 1941. I may say that the correspondence with this one mother occurred during recent weeks. In this case this woman has given two other sons to the service. They have not lost their lives, but they are serving overseas. Her husband operated rather an extensive farm but he died about a year ago, and she feels that his death resulted from overwork caused by losing the help of the sons and inability to obtain adequate help to enable him to carry on. I urge whoever may be responsible for this to consider favourably the amendment of these regulations. I could understand opposition if a pension were involved or if the cost were very great, but this is just a cross showing that the mother has given a son, and should apply, whether it be an adopted son or any other.

The next matter to which I wish to refer is the so-called disembarkation leave. It is my understanding that when a service man has been injured during the performance of his duty and is sent back for later discharge he is entitled to one month's leave, provided he can take that leave within a period of three months. This has caused a good deal of hard feeling, if I may call it that, among service personnel, because a service man who has been severely wounded and has to be hospitalized for a period of more than three 32283-26i

months is not entitled to that disembarkation leave. As a matter of fact I have a letter from a service man, and it might be of interest if I were to read just one paragraph from it. This lad served overseas for three years. As a consequence of his service he was very severely wounded and is now back in Canada. He has been deprived of that thirty days' disembarkation leave, and he says:

There seems to be some misunderstanding amongst the service men in regards to cancellation of disembarkation leave after three months back in Canada. It appears that discrimination is shown, that a fellow hit with a big shell loses his leave due to the fact that he spends three months or more in bed; whereas a fellow who is hit with a small shell is in a position to enjoy this privilege. We feel that you should suggest to the house that in the next war, or in continuing this war, all shells be made the same size, so that there is no cause for this discrimination.

Of course there is some sarcasm there; in fact he adds:

Perhaps Mr. King would be pleased to take this matter up at the San Francisco conference.

Anyway I think it indicates that there is unfairness there. Those boys are bound to place considerable emphasis upon things which to some here at home may appear to be of little consequence.

I have had many communications from service personnel holding lance ranks in the field1. I refer to lance-corporals and-I did not know such a rank existed-lance-sergeants. The man in question was a lance-sergeant and was injured while on the battlefield. In fact the jeep upon which he was riding disappeared, as a result of the explosion of a land mine. He is back, but I doubt whether they have found the jeep or the other soldiers involved.

This man held lance rank on the field1, but when sent back to England, and before being returned to Canada, he was automatically forced to revert to the lower rank, and draw the lower pay. He feels the government is doing that only because of the dollars involved between the rank of corporal and that of lance-sergeant. With those thoughts in mind, his feelings are understandable. I maintain that in all fairness the higher rank should be recognized.

I have another case in mind, but I shall not give much detail, because the minister has been most kind in connection with it. He is working on it right now, and I am hopeful that a satisfactory conclusion may be reached. At this time I wish to deal only with the principle involved. This young man, the father of two children, enlisted for service overseas. He had not been there long when his wife-well, I presume one would say she went

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berserk, I am not sure whether that would be the proper expression. However, the fact is that she deserted her children, with the result that an aunt was obliged to take them. (Later on, the father was killed on the battlefield.

Is there any specified sum to which these children are entitled? In this instance the commission granted a pension of $27 a month for the two children, to remain in effect until they reached the age of sixteen years. I should hate to think that $27 was anything other than an arbitrary sum decided upon by the pension commission. I cannot understand why those children should not be entitled1 to something almost approximating what the wife would have received, had she remained with the children, and had her husband been killed. My understanding is that her pension *would have been considerably more than $27.

I am not criticizing the minister, because I must point out that he has been cooperative in the matter, and I am hopeful that a satisfactory solution will be reached. However, the inspectors of the commission are going back to try to determine what it actually cost to keep those children. I should have thought that would have been done before the sum of $27 was arrived at. Any of us who have had the privilege of providing for children-food, clothing, shelter, medical, dental and optical attention, educational and other services- realize how preposterous the sum of $27 actually is. I hope they will not go to that mother and say, "You have several children of your own; therefore you can keep these two for a few extra dollars." I hope that will not be the method of approach. Certainly somewhere there must be some indication as to what the proper amount should be. When I record these facts I speak for all those who find themselves in similar difficulties. I have heard many complaints from returned servicemen, those who have come back on the so-called rotation leave after spending a number of years overseas.

We understand that they receive a month's pay and allowances plus fifty cents a day. Those men say, "For those of us who have homes to return to, the fifty cents may be quite satisfactory. But how about those who have not homes?" The man who asked me that question had been overseas for five years, and had shown himself to be a capable man and a first-class soldier. He told me that during the victory loan campaign he was organizer in his unit, and used every persuasive measure to get the boys to contribute. He told me that they did so, most generously, but that he felt ashamed of himself when he realized that some of the boys, from whom he had secured almost

their last dollar, had to go back on their rotation leave, and were limited to only a few dollars, worked out at the rate of fifty cents a day.

I have no particular recommendation in this connection, but merely wish to say that I run into these cases all too frequently. Then I have one other matter in mindC I do not know how often this condition arises, but when a set of circumstances is drawn to my attention two or three times in a month I am obliged to conclude that the condition described is general. I have in mind a gentleman fifty-two years of age, a farmer, who enlisted almost immediately at the outbreak of war, proceeding overseas with the first division. He fought with distinction through North Africa and Sicily, and into Italy, having been wounded four times and mentioned in dispatches. This man returned on rotation leave. During his absence he had hired a man and his wife to manage his farm, and it took about every dollar he could get, in addition to what the farm produced, to meet his agreement with that couple.

Upon his return he applied for discharge or return to the battlefield. Now, let me emphasize that this man had been in the army for more than five years, of which four years had been spent overseas, that he had been wounded four times and was mentioned in dispatches. This man was fifty-two years of age, and yet his application for discharge was refused. Instead, they took him to Calgary and gave him a job-I do not know what else I could call it-of carrying afternoon tea to the officers and to some of the C.W.A.C.'s.

I would not mention a case of this kind, were it not for the principle involved. Hon. members know how that soldier feels, and what he would be bound to say in his community. Yet he is no different from any of us or from the minister himself. I am sure the minister would feel that to have to perform a task of that kind is not a fit and proper reward for the service that man has rendered to his country.

I believe I have dealt with almost everything I had in mind. While I am not permitted to ask a question at this stage of proceedings, I should like to learn from the Minister of Finance (Mr. Ilsley) if the eight-cent excise tax charged against cigarettes sent by the Red Cross to soldiers in the service also applies to cigarettes sent overseas? The package with which I was furnished was one provided to a member of the services here in Canada. This lad has unusual ability to express himself, and I should think the minister would be interested in hearing what he has to say. Incidentally, he was severely wounded and, while back

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in Canada, is unfortunately still confined to hospital but hopeful that he will soon be out. This is what he says:

I am sending a .package of cigarettes to illustrate the point I am drawing to your attention, and I feel it would be quite fitting during this particular time, since this Red Cross appeal to the public for voluntary contributions.

And he has underlined the words "voluntary contribution." He continues:

You will notice an eight-cent excise stamp which is found to be on every package issued. It would appear as though the government were trying to balance the budget on these voluntary contributions, which to me seems most unfair. The cigarettes inside have the Red Cross insignia which is proof that they were intended for this purpose.

The public contribute generously to the activities of the Red Cross, and rightly so. We hear reports from overseas and from returning service men about the excellent work being done by this fine organization. But I wonder how many contributors realize that the minister involved-it may be the Minister of National Revenue; perhaps I am referring to the wrong one, but they are all in the same family-is right there to get his eight cents from each package of cigarettes purchased with the money which the public have contributed to the Red Cross believing that it was all going to provide comforts for the boys in the services. I should like to have the minister give some attention to this matter.

These boys who have been in the service for a long time have had a most difficult time. They have acquitted themselves most magnificently and, as I said earlier, while these may seem to be little things to us they possibly take on much larger proportions to these lads.

I feel that none of us should endeavour to make political capital when dealing with service men and the affairs of service personnel. I said in my opening remarks that these boys are looking to us as members of parliament; they are looking also to the government to do the right thing, to do the fair thing, at least to show through what they do for the personnel the appreciation which these boys rightly feel we should hold for their heroic accomplishments.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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LIB

Leslie Alexander Mutch

Liberal

Mr. L. A. MUTCH (Winnipeg South):

Mr. Speaker, the turn which this debate has taken toward matters affecting the reestablishment and rehabilitation of our service personnel prompts me to say a few words, because in the nature of things I have had fairly close association with the rehabilitation programme as it is being carried out in connection with the more or less piecemeal demobilization now taking place. It seems to me that if we approach the problem of the rehabilitation of

our service men from the point of view that the rehabilitation legislation is an attempt to reward those who have had active service, no matter what we do we shall fall far short of what would be the natural objective of those who understand and appreciate the contribution to our safety, indeed to our very existence, which these serving personnel have made.

Consequently I think the members of all parties, as well as the government, who share in the responsibility to the returned service personnel would be on sounder ground if they would regard all rehabilitation efforts and legislation, not in the nature of a reward for service but rather as something designed to help the service personnel who are to be demobilized to help themselves.

I have made some study of the rehabilitation legislation which is currently on the statute books and which is currently being put into effect in connection with those returning from active service. I am satisfied that the one idea which runs through it all is a desire to assist those, who have made a sacrifice for which we cannot presume to pay, to drop back into their place in the community with the least possible further sacrifice as a result of their service. When you come to look at the actual legislation you realize -that, designedly no doubt since it is so consistent, it does achieve that objective.

To begin with, when the soldier returns after having served overseas he is given a month leave of absence as quickly as he can be moved from the depot in order to provide him with some little period of time in which he can adjust himself to family and civilian conditions before it is necessary to make anything in the nature of a decision as to just what his place in civilian society will be. Under the present set-up, on his return there are facilities, within the Department of National Defence itself, to make him fully aware of the opportunities which lie before him. Every inducement is made to help him understand his own capabilities. In few, if any instances, is there an attempt made to shuffle him off to the first available job at the first opportunity -Rather there is a desire to encourage him to seek to go back into civilian life, not on the basis of something as good as he had before, but on the basis of what his capabilities show he will have a chance to achieve.

Those of us who went through the last war and the period of rehabilitation afterward will remember the disadvantages suffered by all returned service personnel when they came back into civilian society. Where the returned man had to enter into competition with a man who had been working at his trade throughout the period of the war he was at a

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disadvantage in that he had, perhaps, lost something of his skill. If he had had no opportunity to accumulate savings, if he had gone away as a boy and came back as a man he found it almost impossible to assume the obligations of a home, in many instances for years to come.

The personnel returning at the present time have an advantage, first of all, by reason of the fact that their gratuity is paid out in periods varying on the average from four to seven months. They are thus able to seek the place in society where they desire to be without having to make a hasty decision. If they have lost skill during the period of their service they may take a refresher course and thus be able to go back into their trade on a competitive basis with men whose service has been rendered at home.

If they have been married during the period of their service or if they desire to marry shortly after coming home they have the advantage, if employed in an insurable trade, of having their unemployment insurance taken care of as though they had been working. Within a couple of months they will have the advantage of the family allowances. Both of these pieces of legislation tend, not to reward them for what they have done, but to reduce the discrepancies between their position in society and the position of those men whose service has been given at home.

Under the provisions of the insurance legislation it is possible for a soldier who has suffered some disability in service to secure the same degree of protection for his family by taking insurance and at more reasonable rates than his more fortunate brother has been able to secure during the period of his service in civilian occupation.

Members of parliament are fully aware of the legislation designed to protect the man who desires to return to the job he left before he enlisted. They know also of the training being provided for those who had no jobs before they went to war but who have shown some aptitude for a particular job or trade and desire to fit themselves for some specific occupation.

Most of the complaints which have been made with respect to vocational training have arisen because to a considerable degree the training scheme was conceived on the basis of there being a mass demobilization. At the present time, when demobilization, extensive though it is, is only a small fraction of what it must eventually become, and before too long we hope, it is not always possible to take individuals in certain selected communities and provide for them that type of vocational training which they desire, unless it is possible for them to train on the job to which

they hope eventually to go. The facilities for vocational training have been seriously overtaxed both by civilian needs and by the use which has been made of these facilities by the armed services to train technical personnel. It is because it is realized that it is not possible to grant to every returned soldier, immediately upon discharge, the type of vocational training that he desires at the place where he desires to take it, that the legislation permits him to elect to take that training over a period of some fifteen months after his discharge or after the end of the war, whichever be the later. In the majority of instances this would not work a hardship because in almost every area in Canada to-day there are opportunities for temporary wartime employment to fill in the intervening months.

I should not like the impression to go out from the debates in this house that the somewhat vexed question of the payment of a deceased soldier's gratuity to his estate or his family has been brought to the notice of the government only by members of the opposition group. I can say with some authority that the weight of pressure upon the minister and the government to deal more generously in the matter of paying the gratuities to the families of deceased soldiers has been approximately in proportion to the percentages represented by the opposition and government groups in the house. It is not always either desirable or effective to exercise whatever weight a member may have through the medium of public debate. I know from many conversations that I have had with members of the government, the pressure that has been upon them with respect to this matter. I am aware of how helpful some of the comments of members of the opposition have been to the ministry, who realize the need of some provision of this kind. I should like to say on my own behalf that the imperfections which exist and which we shall experience from time to time with new situations, are not the discoveries of individual members or individual parties, and it seems to me that the best hope of achieving those changes which from time to time will be necessary, lies in the type of cooperative and explanatory discussion which has taken place so far in this debate.

There is in the minds of some people throughout the country, and it is implied in the expressions of some members of the house, a consuming fear that we shall again run into problems of rehabilitation paralleling those which occurred not immediately after the last war but which accumulated with varying intensities in the ten or twelve years following

War Appropriation

the last war. I should like to suggest in that connection that many of us have I think been overlooking at least this one consideration which I believe will go a long way toward lightening the shock of rehabilitation which was felt after the last war. I am reminded that something over ninety-five per cent of the men and women serving in the Canadian armed forces to-day are Canadian born. They come from communities throughout the length and breadth of Canada, and they will return in the first instance, at any rate, to the communities whence they came. There they have in their parents, in their families, in their friends, in the businessmen of their communities-and this has been exemplified over and over again in the activities of civilian committees throughout the country-a degree of contact which did not exist for the veterans returning from the last war because, as we remember, only about 225,000 out of some

600,000 Canadian soldiers in the last war happened to be Canadian born. Thousands of men who fought in the Canadian army and brought distinction to Canada and returned to Canada to make their contribution to this country from then on until now, were men who had been but a short time in Canada prior to the last war. They came back to a country which they knew but ill, but a country to whose glory and prestige they had contributed so much. There is a vast difference between^ going home to a community in which you have a place with your family by right of birth, and in going back, not to a home, not to a position, not to a particularly well-established place in the community, but to a country which was glad to see you but which did not have that personal interest in your welfare which the parents and families and friends of the veterans of to-day's armed services will have.

Therefore, we should look upon rehabilitation not just as something to be manufactured by members of this House of Commons, not something which is to be a governmental reward for service, but as something, once the war is out of the way, which is worthy of the greatest cooperative effort which the people of Canada can make. It seems to me that if we go forward in that spirit we do not need to be fearful of the problem of rehabilitation. But neither have we the slightest justification, because the boys and girls will be going home to their own communities to a place which is theirs by right of birth, to feel that we are absolved of responsibility. If by our speeches here or in the campaign which is to come we give or seek to give, even unconsciously, the impression that we intend entering into a competition in offering rewards, then much of

the thought and foresight which have gone into the planning and preparation of our rehabilitation programme will be undone and we , shall be in danger of creating another migrant body of dissatisfied people, this in spite of the chance we now have by cooperative effort to bring back into the communal life of this country our own sons and daughters and make them feel, not that we are rewarding them, but that we are determined that they shall not suffer further for that which they have done.

It will not be good enough to say to these people, "Here is a job which gives you economic independence." It will not be good

enough to say to them, "You went to do what was no more than your duty," because they concede that. It will not be good enough to say to them, "Now that you are back and are none the worse for it you can fend for yourselves." That will not be good enough. What is required of us in this house and in the whole country is that we keep before us what I believe the conception of the department to be, that it is the obligation, the duty and the high privilege of all of us to help these people to help themselves, to find within the structure of our community and of our social and political life their rightful place. Keeping that in mind, then I believe these inequities, inequalities and discrepancies which arise from time to time, tackled in that spirit, will not present any permanent difficulty.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. ROBERT FAIR (Battle River):

Before allowing the motion to pass, I should like to say a few words in connection with some of the legislation passed since the war broke out. Since springtime is about here, and is indeed here in several parts of Canada, and since a number of veterans of this war will soon settle on the land and go to work under legislation, recently passed, I feel it my duty to say a few words in that regard. Before I deal further with that, however, there is another matter which. I think should be considered, and that is in connection with similar legislation passed at the close of the last great war.

This matter has been taken up on several occasions but I am sorry to say it has not had very much favourable consideration by the government, either this or previous administrations. We have on several occasions brought to the attention of the house the situation of the soldier settlers under the old soldier settlement board. During 1944 the soldier settlers were very active, going so far as to send a delegation of nine to Ottawa to present their case. At that time we were not given any satisfaction as to w'hat the government's

War Appropriation

answer would be to the request of the old settlers, that request being, of course, that clear titles to their land be given them.

Eary this year the Minister of Veterans' Affairs replied to me that the government would not grant these clear titles, and as a result the soldier settlers' association sent a delegation of two, whom I accompanied here, to place before the minister a further brief. In order to give the house some idea of the standing of these settlers, I feel I can do no better than read that brief so that it may appear on Hansard. The brief was presented by the president and secretary of the Soldier Settlers' Association of Canada. Mr. Harold Baker is president and Mr. Alfred J. Sibley secretary, and the brief was presented on March 5 last as follows:

March 5, 1945.

To the Honourable Ian A. Mackenzie,

Minister of Veterans Affairs,

Ottawa, Ont.

Sir: As representatives of the Soldier Settlers' Association of Canada, we have the honour to present this further brief of our requests to the government made on May 23, 1944. We still, as before, ask for a clear title to all lands held by soldier settlers as at March 31, 1944, under the Soldier Settlement Act of 1919.

Practically all of these settlers are now over 60 years of age, indeed some are beyond the 80-year mark. Because of information given in your letter of the 3rd of February to Robert Fair, M.P., we have again come to Ottawa, driven by necessity, to arrive at a definite decision acceptable to those old soldiers whom we represent. As at March 31, 1944, there were 6,153 soldier settlers still holding contracts on their farms and who owed a total of $7,715,954.01.

The average indebtedness of all soldier settlers under the scheme was $4,358, and the average indebtedness of those still holding contracts is $1,254 as at March 31 last.

This represents 29 per cent of the average original loan. In spite of the fact that several reductions were made in the original debt, and of the fact that the settlers, their wives and families have worked for the past 25 years, only 4,130, or 16 per cent of the original number have acquired titles and 6,153, or 25 per cent of the original number are still holding contracts, while almost 60 per cent have either quit voluntarily or been forced off their farms. In connection with the above figures, it must also be understood that many settlers who have acquired titles or kept their contracts in good standing have used up money that should properly have been used for the proper maintenance of the settler and his family and the upkeep of his buildings, machinery and other equipment, and also includes sums of money that have been returned to the farms by the members of the settlers' families who have worked in war industries or have enlisted in the services. The average annual cost of the administration of the scheme is approximately $1,100,000 or I of the total amount owed by the settlers as at March 31 last. Plainly speaking, seven years of this administration would eat up the whole of the present debt.

Taking the foregoing into consideration we are convinced that the government would actually save money by granting clear titles now without any further payments. Failure to do this will force a number of the present settlers to apply for war veterans' allowance benefits which will cost the government $720 a year for the settler and his wife, and in two years the government will have paid more than the present average indebtedness of the settlers, whereas, if clear title is given, many of the settlers will not apply for the allowance.

The V eterans' Land Act is now becoming operative, and many of the contract holders under that act are sons and daughters of the old soldier settlers. If the present plight of the old settlers is allowed to continue, the effect on the morale of the new settlers might well be disastrous, as the unjust treatment and sufferings of the old settlers are well known throughout the country. Under the Veterans' Land Act the settlers get a grant of 38 per cent of the original loan. The amount now owing by the old settlers is only 29 per cent of their original loan. The rate of interest under the Veterans' Land Act is 3J per cent; under the Soldier Settlement Act the rate of interest on current accounts was 5 per cent and 7 per cent on arrears.

Because the Soldier Settlement Act legislation was enacted for the rehabilitation of veterans of great Avar 1, and because economic conditions that existed during past years made it impossible for the settlers to pay, we believe our request is reasonable and just. Our request has the support of thousands who signed a petition early last year, as well as the Alberta legislature, the 20,000 members of the Alberta farmers' union, the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool, the United Farmers of Canada Saskatchewan Section; the United Farmers of Alberta, the Canadian Federation of Agriculture and the Executives of the Alberta and British Columbia commands of the Canadian Legion. We believe that our request for clear titles for all holders of contracts under the Soldier Settlement Board Act, as at March 31, 1944. is reasonable and just, and your immediate favourable consideration will be appreciated.

Respectfully submitted by

Harold C. Baker, President Alfred J. Sibley, Secretary. Soldier Settlers' Association of Canada.

I may say that during the present year the Saskatchewan legislature has joined in with those who have already signed and the Alberta legislature and the Alberta farmers' union have also once again endorsed this request. I have the resolutions here, but I do not think it is necessary to read them because they have been in the press and have been discussed all through western Canada and in many parts of eastern Canada.

After presenting this brief we had a very nice talk with the Minister of Veterans' Affairs (Mr. Mackenzie). I feel quite satisfied that the minister is sympathetic. If that is not correct perhaps the minister will contradict me. I also feel that several members of the

War Appropriation

cabinet are sympathetic, and I only wish we could have an opportunity of giving the members of the house a chance to vote on this question. If that were done I believe we would have a very large majority voting in favour of it. But I am sorry that we have some men in this house-men who apparently have quite a little power-who do not want this to go through. I see one of them sitting here now. The Minster of Finance (Mr. Ilsley) is not favourable to this going through. He feels that we are now making good collections from these men, and he also feels that contracts should be honoured. All of us are in favour of contracts being honoured, but when an unjust contract is made then I think some adjustment should be made even to civilians. I believe that is only right.

Debt adjustment legislation has been passed and has been in force over the years; and because the farming community as a whole all throughout Canada has been at a disadvantage over the years, particularly between 1930 and 1940, I feel that something drastic should be done in connection with these contracts. Had the government of the day-and I am including both Conservatives and Liberals in this- seen to it that farmers received their proper percentage of the national income during the years that these contracts have been in force then there would be no need for me to be pleading again on behalf of the old soldier settlers to have clear titles granted.

During the depression years we had at least thirty-three per cent of the population of Canada living on the land, and when that portion of Canada's' population received no more than five per cent of the national income I ask the Minister of Finance if the government was honouring its contracts and its obligations? Why did not they step in then and do something about it They did not. The farmers were taking the rap, and that was quite all right. When we go back to 1932, five per cent of the national income was all that the farmers had, and yet the settlers and farmers in general were expected to pay up their debts.

I could, if I wished, name others who are not treated in this way. To go back to the Minister of Veterans' Affairs, I said a moment ago I believe he is sympathetic, but he has as director of the soldier settlement board and the Veterans' Land Act a gentleman who apparently is not sympathetic. If that director is not sympathetic, then I feel we have other men who are sympathetic to the soldiers and who are just as efficient as he is, and I believe in the interests of the success of the Veterans' Land1 Act a change should be made in the department.

The arguments presented by the Minister of Veterans Affairs-and I believe the arguments were passed on to him by the director of that department-are that payments and pre-payments are being made. I will admit frankly that farmers are in a better position to-day to make payments than they have been for quite a while, but I think the price that we are paying in flesh and blood and sacrifice is much too high. We had to have a war before farmers could be prosperous enough to pay off their debts, and that is no credit to this or any other country. Payments are also being made because members of the old soldiers' families are working in war industries to-day and some of them are in the services. Payments are also being made because a number of these old soldiers are afraid of being put on the road, as numbers of other soldiers have been, and when their families come back there will be no roof for them to get under. Some say we are not turning any soldier settlers off the land, or at least very few. Very recently I had a return brought down which I believe justifies what I have said. During the years 1930-31 to 1943-44, a fourteen year period, we had no less than 2,064 of these old soldier settlers sign quit claim deeds. That means an average of 147 settlers in these fourteen years signed quit claim deeds. Why did they sign quit claim deeds? Simply because they could not make their payments. We also had during that 1930-31 to 1943-44 fiscal year period 934 of the old veterans of great war one kicked out on the street, and in many cases with no place to go. Why were they served these thirty-day notices? Simply because they could not pay. That is an average of 67 of our old veterans kicked out every year from 1930-31 to 1943-44.

There is one thing I should like the house to take particular notice of. In 1938-39 we had 143 of these old veterans kicked off the land; in 1939-40 at the time the war broke out we had 162 kicked off and in 1940-41 no fewer than 192 kicked off.

We have passed a lot of legislation here that deserves favourable comment, but the Veterans' Land Act may turn out, unless something is done, which I intend to suggest before I sit down, to be a repetition of the old soldier settlement board legislation. After what our men and women have gone through over the years I do not think we should ask them to go through the treatment endured by the old soldiers.

Another argument passed on to the minister from the director, I believe, was that if these clear titles are granted now to the old veterans of great vrar one the soldiers under the new Veterans' Land Act, will not pay, but will demand the same treatment. I see in that an

402 COMMONS

War Appropriation ___________

admission by the government that the Veterans' Land Act is going to be a failure. If these men are given proper conditions there vvill not be any need for them to ask for dear titles without making full payment. To my mind this argument is an admission by the government that we are going to have a drop in the price of farm products that will not allow these new settlers to make their payments.

Before going on to deal with the Veterans' Land Act, may I say that when this scheme was started we had 25,017 settle on the land. On March 31, 1944, 4,130 or sixteen percent, had clear titles after twenty-five years labour on the land, 6,153 still held contracts. That amounts to twenty-five per cent, leaving almost sixty per cent who had deserted their farms or were forced off. Is that a bright future for those who intend to settle under the Veterans' Land Act? In order to make the Veterans' Land Act a success I believe we should have it administered by an efficient and sympathetic director. I have already dealt with that but I again wish to make it plain that we must have a different head in that organization. An increase in the amount provided for live stock and equipment should be made. It is only $1,200 at the present time and that would pay about two-thirds of the price of a tractor.

I do not care how good a farmer a man may be; unless he has sufficient equipment he cannot make a success on the land. In the past we have spent millions of dollars in training these men efficiently to destroy human life and property. Why not provide a few millions now to set them up in business, so that they can make a living on the land? Those settlers are bound by contract; and I say "bound by contract" because they have signed up for land, live stock and equipment based on to-day's prices for farm produce. If those men are. to make a success; if they are ever to get clear title to their land, I feel that the government is duty bound to guarantee them similar prices for their products during the period they are paying back that loan. By that I mean that if wheat is worth $1.25 a bushel to-day and later on those settlers have to sell it for seventy-five cents a bushel, then the government should give them a book credit of fifty cents a bushel, if they, are ever to get title to their land. I do not care if we give them all their land, live stock and equipment free; if we compel them to produce at below the cost of production there is only one thing ahead of them a little later on; that is to be kicked

off their land by a dictator director, as has been done with a number of the settlers of great war No. 1.

I suppose that suggestion will be met with the reply that we have passed legislation providing that prices of agricultural products will be maintained at certain levels. I am quite ready to admit that such legislation has been passed; but I think the government also will admit that we have not been given any figure on which those prices will be stabilized, and the success of this legislation will depend entirely on the level that is set for prices of farm products. Between 1930 and 1940 the farmers received 9-4 per cent of the national income. If prices of agricultural products are fixed on that basis, then the legislation will not be worth the paper it is written on. If prices of farm products are brought up to such a level that the farmers of Canada will receive their proper percentage of the national income, then the legislation will be successful.

I do not want to take up very much more of the time of the house, but I would remind hon. members that the governments of Alberta and British Columbia have made provision for grants of land to men who enlisted from those provinces and who wish to return to the land there. I will let some of the British Columbia members give the details of their legislation, but in the case of Alberta a man who enlisted from that province will receive a half-section of land in a soil-tested district. During the.first three years he will not be asked to pay one penny. During the remaining seven years he will be required to turn in one-eighth of the returns from his crops. The government 'has gone farther and suggested to the dominion government that if they will pay half the cost of clearing and breaking forty acres of land after the settler goes in, the Alberta government will pay the other half. Then, at the end of ten years, instead of the bailiff being sent there to kick the man off the land, he will be given clear title to that half-section. In the long run I believe this will be cheaper, and I think we owe it to the veterans of this war.

Then, in order to clear a blot from the statute books of this country I suggest that even before the next election the government make available some $8,000,000 or even less to clear off the indebtedness of those old soldiers who are still working under the soldier settlement board legislation. This war is costing us something like $16,000,000 a day. Can we not afford to spend half of that amount to' free these old soldier settlers of the past? Once more I ask the government to give this matter favourable consideration, because what has been done is not good

War Appropriation

enough. I do not wish to see the veterans of this war getting at our hands the kind of treatment that has been handed out to the soldier settlers of the last war.

Mr. WILFRID LaCROIX (Quebec-Mont-morency) (Translation): Mr. Speaker, we are being asked in this resolution to vote two billion dollars for the conduct of naval, military and air operations beyond Canada; the greater part of that appropriation will be for the war against Japan. I wish to voice at once my objections against conscription under any form for the dispatch of soldiers, sailors and airmen for service in the war against Japan, which Canada declared before the United States had itself decided upon it. I take this stand for the following reasons:

Firstly, the costs entailed by the dispatch of such forces will cause the maintenance of the present taxes in this country, and I think that our industry and commerce which will be called upon, after the war with Germany has ended, to proceed with the reorganization of their business with a view to their conversion to peace-time activity, will not be able to do anything along those lines so long as taxes have not been lowered. Secondly, our population of 12 million, which is now greatly reduced through our war effort, will not be able, in view of the extent of our territory, to plan for the development of our natural resources so as to compete with those countries which, not being at war with Japan, will necessarily have forged ahead by taking advantage of the period during which war with that country will last, and this to our detriment on world markets, because that war can still last for one or two years.

Thirdly, it will be contrary to all promises previously made by the Liberal government to the people of Quebec to send against his will a single one of our fellow-citizens to fight outside this country and especially against Japan, whether it be under the form of a voluntary system involving a hypocritical and disguised conscription, as was shown by the administration of the National Resources Mobilization Act, or by virtue of an act establishing outright conscription for overseas service, as happened in the ease of bill 80 passed by this house a short time after the resignation of the hon. member for Richelieu-Yercheres (Mr. Cardin) from the cabinet, and under which the order in council of last fall was passed.

Why should we let our country fall more deeply into debt when the whole world recognizes that we have done more than we were humanly able to do? No one can foretell how much longer the war with Japan will last. President Roosevelt himself has stated

that the road to Tokyo would be much harder than the road to Berlin. Why should we not avail ourselves of the opportunity offered, based on common sense and good logic, to show that we are able to act independently without submitting to the dictates from London?

The other day, I heard the hon. member for Beauharnois-Laprairie (Mr. Raymond) state, in a speech, that the San Francisco conference would stand as an affirmation of our independence. However, the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) has taken upon himself to refute him most emphatically, when he stated, right after the speech of the hon. member for Beauharnois-Laprairie, as reported in Hansard on Wednesday, March 28, 1945:

Hon. gentlemen opposite will find out when the opportunity comes-and I am thankful to say it will be given fairly soon-for them as well as the government to appear before the people of this country, whether or not the people of Canada feel that I have done my duty by the British commonwealth of nations, by the British empire, through every hour of the time I have been serving as Prime Minister of this country.

There is also this other statement of the Prime Minister of Canada, made on the previous day and also reported in Hansard. I quote:

Why does my hon. friend say that Canada will not do her full part in the British commonwealth, .after what she has done during this war ?

That is to say Canada will continue to be a colony of the empire as heretofore.

Besides, the hon. member for Beauharnois-Laprairie said, in his speech, that our group had always hoped that Canada might participate in previous conferences, such as those held at Dumbarton Oaks, Bretton Woods, Yalta, et cetera; this, he claimed, should be a reason to incite us to take part in the San Francisco meeting. However, it is precisely because our country has not taken part in any of these other conferences, and this in spite of our protests, that we are justified in refraining from cooperating in the San Francisco meeting ; for, at all these previous conferences, decisions have been taken without our consent, such as the dismemberment of Poland, the right to veto, and the three votes granted to Russia, the assumption of control over our economic set-up by international finance following the decisions taken at Bretton Woods. All these decisions will be ratified by the San Francisco conference, as the Prime Minister has frankly admitted in his speech.

Why should we pay the price of secret or public agreements to which we have never

TVar Appropriation

given our approval? Why should we allow our country to be drawn into another conflict following decisions which we have never concurred in?

I am not surprised by the stand taken by the hon. member for Beauharnois^Laprairie, for he did not vote against the act mobilizing our human and national resources which has resulted, for our people, in a hypocritical and disguised conscription and the setting up in our country of an economic dictatorship which has sounded the death knell of small businesses and small industrial plants by denying them the quotas of goods and materials to which they were entitled for the benefit of large trusts which, owing to the National Resources Mobilization Act, had representatives on all government bodies who were known as dollar-a-year men.

I respect the views of the hon. member for Beauharnois-Laprairie, but by his stand in regard to the National Resources Mobilization Act he has contributed in setting up in our country the worst economic dictatorship in- our history, the repercussions of which will be felt long after the war is ended.

The representative of a newspaper expressed the wish, in his daily column, that the hon. member for Beauharnois-Laprairie be chosen as one of Canada's representatives to the San Francisco conference. I sincerely believe that he deserves this appointment and I trust that this time he will be more successful than in 193S when he was mentioned for appointment as Canadian- representative in Paris, at the very moment when he voted for the war appropriations which involved our country into a disastrous participation in the war.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER (Mr. Bradette):

Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt the motion?

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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IND

Joseph Sasseville Roy

Independent

Mr. ROY:

On division.

Motion agreed to on division and the house went into committee, Mr. Bradette in the chair.

Topic:   WAR APPROPRIATION BILL
Subtopic:   PROVISION FOR GRANTING TO HIS MAJESTY AID FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE AND SECURITY
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DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR NAVAL SERVICES


Hon. ANGUS L. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence for Naval Services): Mr. Chairman, the estimated amount required by the Department of National Defence for Naval Service for the five months, April to August, 1945, is §140,043,500. Before the committee comes to consider the naval estimates I shall try, following the practice in previous years, to give a general account of the work of the Royal Canadian Navy during the past twelve months. In some respects I feel I could do no better in this regard than to invite the committee to read an article that appears in the Canadian Geographical Journal, for November, 1944, from the pen of Commander William Strange, R.C.N.V.R., brilliant radio writer and journalist, Commander Strange styled his article "The Wonderful Year", taking -his title from the lines of the two-hundred-year-old naval march, "Heart of Oak": Come, cheer up, my lads, 'tis to glory we steer, To add something new to this wonderful year. The last year has been truly a wonderful year of achievement for the Canadian navy. - Ships. When I last spoke to the committee, just a little over a year ago, when the estimates of this department were under consideration, I said that the number of fighting ships in the Canadian navy was roughly 250. To-day our fighting ship strength stands at about 370. Thus, we have added some 120 fighting ships to our navy in the past year. Included in the number are a cruiser, several destroyers, many'- frigates, corvettes, minesweepers and smaller fighting craft. Besides the fighting ships more than 550 patrol and auxiliary vessels now fly the white ensign, an increase of more than 100 of such craft during the year. Personnel. Personnel of the Royal Canadian Navy now number more than 95,000, included in which figure are nearly 6,000 members of the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service. This represents an increase of about 15,000 over the figure of one year ago. The navy has now virtually reached its contemplated full strength in personnel. Recruiting from now on will be limited to the numbers necessary to replace casualties and discharges. While on the subject of personnel, Mr. Chairman, I should like to say that no fewer than six of my colleagues in the cabinet have sons in the Canadian navy, and, in addition, many other hon. members in the House of Commons have sons and daughters in that service. By provinces, enlistments in the navy have been as set out in the following -tables: Officers Ratings Prince Edward Island.. . . 55 1,368Nova Scotia . . 626 6,515New Brunswick . . 162 2,570Quebec .. 1,280 11,792Ontario . . 2.284 41,218Manitoba . . 281 8.110Saskatchewan . . 185 6.782Alberta .. 218 7.792British Columbia . . 1,126 11,868 I take now the next matter, that of operations. particularly of convoys. Our main task in the past year has remained the task of convoy work in the north Atlantic. It was to War Appropriation-Naval Services that task that we bent our energies from the beginning of the war, and it is to that great task that we must devote almost entirely our efforts until the war with Germany is brought to a successful conclusion. The importance of the Atlantic lifeline, the great ocean highway which links the British isles and the American continent, has been stressed' so often and by so many people that I need not at this time emphasize its significance. In the early autumn of 1940 one of our first corvettes was putting out on her maiden voyage from the harbour of Halifax. She was commanded by Lieutenant George Hay Stephen, R.C.N.R., a native of Scotland, but for many years a resident of Montreal. Lieutenant Stephen is now Commander Stephen. He is a winner of the O.B.E., the Distinguished Service Cross, Bar to the Distinguished Service Cross and a Mention in Dispatches. It was felt that some sort of ceremony should be arranged for an occasion that seemed historic and accordingly a band was stationed on one of the great piers of that harbour. As the little ship sailed out from the safety of her port into the perils of the great Atlantic, the band, at the request of the Scottish-Canadian captain of the corvette, played that widely known and justly popular air, "The Road to the Isles". That little ship was indeed taking the road to the Isles. Not, it is true, the road of the song, but the broad high road of ocean that leads to the great isles themselves, the great isles that in those days stood alone in Europe against the might and savagery of German attack. I may tell the committee that since September, 1939, more than two hundred million tons of cargo have been moved over that road. Without that vast amount of food and war material and without the troops which crossed the seas in safety, it is not too much to say that the fight in Europe could not have been carried on. If the nazis had been successful in blocking the great ocean paths to Britain, the liberating armies of the Allies would not be in western Europe at this hour. The invasion, and all events that have followed, were made possible-and let us never forget this- only by the fact that throughout the dark and terrible days when enemy submarines threatened to overwhelm us, the men of the sea held the ocean lanes clear, fought the convoys through, fed and supplied the island fortress of Britain, cheerfully bore the fierce hardships of the North Atlantic, died like heroes when their hour came, and earned the gratitude of all civilized people for their efforts. The task of convoying on the North Atlantic has been one of tremendous greatness and I would not have it understood that the Canadian navy alone has been entirely responsible for its execution. British ships and United States ships have contributed mightily to the success of this vast operation. On the other hand, I am proud to point out that at certain periods within the last few years more than one-half of the entire burden of transatlantic escort work fell upon the shoulders of the Canadian navy. At one stage, during the summer of 1944, Canadian ships did one hundred per cent of close escort work on the north Atlantic and at the same time they formed thirty per cent of the striking forces in that area. Last summer the largest convoy ever to sail the Atlantic, a convoy of 167 merchant ships, carrying more than one million tons of cargo, sailed from North American shores and reached its destination without the loss of a single ship. The protection for this great armada was provided by the escort vessels of the Canadian navy. Invasion. I recall that two years ago when the naval estimates were under discussion some regret was expressed by an hon. member that the Canadian navy did not have ships capable of taking part in an invasion of Europe. That hon. gentleman, I have no doubt, was thinking of larger types of ships than we had in operation at the time. I can say now, however, that when the great assault on nazi held territory was opened on June 6 last the Canadian navy, in addition to all its convoy duties on the broad Atlantic, was able to supply more than 100 ships and nearly 10,090 naval personnel for the task. We allocated for this purpose two fleet destroyers, nine escort destroyers, two support groups of frigates, nineteen corvettes, two flotillas of minesweepers, two flotillas of motor torpedo boats, two landing ships, fourteen assault craft and thirty landing craft for infantry. At the same time, and for some time before, our four tribal destroyers the Iroquois, Atha-baskan, Huron and Haida were engaged with four like ships of the Royal Navy in assault work in the British channel and the bay of Biscay. These ships were all grouped in what was known as the tenth destroyer flotilla and from April to September of last year this flotilla compiled one of the most remarkable records of the entire war. In a little more than four months these eight ships sank thirty-six German ships, including destroyers, minesweepers, trawlers, armed merchant vessels, tankers and) a submarine and damaged fifteen other enemy ships, with the loss of only one of their own ships, the Canadian ship Athabaskan. It is difficult to single out any particular persons for special commendation but the commanding officers of these ships, perhaps, deserve to be particularly mentioned:-Cap-



War Appropriation-Naval Services tain H. G. DeWolf of the Haida who, for his gallantry and skill, was awardted the D.S.O., D.S.C. and four Mentions in Dispatches; Captain Rayner of the Huron, who received a bar to his D.S.C. and two Mentions in Dispatches; Commander J. C. Hibbard of the Iroquois who received a bar to his already won D.S.C.; and Lieut. Commander John Stubbs of the Atha-baskan, who had won his D.S.O. two years before, who received the D.S.C. for preinvasion work and who unfortunately is still missing. I should like to make some mention of the great successes enjoyed before, during and since the invasion day by our two flotillas of motor torpedo boats. These small but extremely fast and effective ships have been operating with coastal forces in the United Kingdom for several yearn. Their work is hazardous and exacting. They operate mainly at night and when they engage the enemy they do so at very close range. These ships are not named but are given a number. I should like to put on the records of this house the name of Lieutenant Commander Anthony Law of Quebec city, who has been awarded the D.S.C. and a Mention in Dispatches, who commands one of the flotillas, and the name of Lieutenant Commander James R. Kirkpatrick of Kitchener, Ontario, who commands the other flotilla, and who also has received the D.S.C. and a Mention in Dispatches. Enemy losses. Since I last spoke to the committee about a year ago Canadian ships have destroyed or shared in the destruction of ten submarines and in the probable destruction of six submarines. Since the beginning of the war Canadian ships have destroyed or shared in the destruction of twenty-two enemy submarines, have probably destroyed eight submarines, and probably damaged seven more submarines. In the same period, that is, since the beginning of the war, our ships have participated in the sinking of forty-four enemy surface vessels, in the severe damaging of twenty-six enemy surface vessels, and in the capture of one enemy surface vessel. The enemy vessels sunk or damaged included destroyers, minesweepers, trawlers, E-boat9 and merchant ships. Add these two achievements together and you will see that Canadian ships of war have sunk, either by themselves or in company with other ships, a total of sixty-six enemy vessels of various types, have damaged twenty-six others, have captured one, have probably sunk eight and probably damaged seven more. Enemy devices. The Atlantic campaign, for it is a campaign rather than a battle, is still being fought out. In recent .months the enemy has adopted certain new tactics and made cer- /Mr. A. L. Macdonald.] tain improvements in his submarines, mention of which has been made several times in official statements as well as in press dispatches. One of the significant new developments is that of the "Schnorkel," or breathing device which enables the submarine to get air and to charge its batteries without coming to the surface. This apparatus makes detection of submarines a great deal more difficult. There is no doubt that the enemy's construction of submarines is still continuing despite air attacks on submarine yards. There is also reason to believe that some of the German submarines have a greater under-water speed than formerly. In recent months enemy submarines have concentrated their efforts, to a greater degree than formerly, in coastal waters. Under a tactic of this kind there is no reason to believe that Canadian coastal waters will be free from these underwater marauders. It may well be that we shall have submarine attacks in Canadian waters on an increased scale. I do not wish to alarm the committee or the country, but I remind the committee of what was said a few days ago by the President of the United States and the Prime Minister of Great Britain in their joint monthly statement on submarine warfare, that an enemy with a large number of submarines is always a threat to our shipping. Where that threat may be manifested in future months no one can predict, but we have no reason to assume that our waters will be immune, and therefore we cannot accept any relaxation in our anti-submarine measures. Merchant ship losses. It may be said now, that in the years 1940,1941 and 1942, the enemy was able to sink more merchant ships than could be replaced. We had not yet gathered our full strength either in escort ships or in merchant ships, but in 1943 the tide turned. In 1943 the united nations' losses of merchant ships were only about one-half of what they had been in 1942. In 1944 merchant ship losses were about one-third of what they were in 1943. These figures prove that our warship strength was growing and that we were able to offer greater protection to our convoys. The year 1943 was remarkable for another fact and it is this; not only were our sinkings of merchant ships less than they had been in the year before, but our construction of merchant vessels was much greater than it had been in the previous year. The same comment may be made about the year 1944. Our merchant tonnage at the end of that year was considerably greater than it was at the beginning. For the present year, 1945, while it 'is true that the enemy has shown greater activity than in the months immediately preceding, nevertheless the loss of merchant tonnage this Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry year is not such as to. cause alarm, and at the same time our successes against enemy submarines last month were satisfactory. Losses of Canadian warships. I regret to have to report that from the time of my last statement to this committee and up to February 28, 1945-that covers a period of nearly one year-we have lost as a result of enemy action the Tribal destroyer Athabaskan, the frigate Valley field, the corvettes Regina, Al-berni, Shawinigan and Trentonian, the minesweeper Clayoquot, and two motor torpedo boats. From the beginning of the war up to February 28, 1945, we lost twenty ships by enemy action and twelve from other causes. Casualties. Our casualties from the beginning of the war up to February 28, 1945, are: Killed on active service 1,498 Other deaths 224 Wounded or injured 388 Prisoners of war 87 Missing 44 The sympathy of the committee and of the house will be with the relatives and friends of these gallant men who have given their lives in their country's service. Decorations. On the other hand, I am proud to say that since the beginning of the war 1,168 Canadian naval officers and men have been recognized by His Majesty the King, and by foreign governments, for their gallantry and devotion to duty. Last year I placed on Hansard a list of those so honoured, and it included some 519 names. In the past year the number of decorations won by the Canadian navy amounted to 649 and therefore surpassed the total number won in all the previous years of the war. This fact alone indicates the growing size and the increased operational scope of this navy. With the consent of the committee I should like to place on Hansard, without reading it, a list of the men so honoured from the time of my last report up to and including March 20 of this year. Operational Honours and Awards Operational awards granted to personnel of the Naval Service from March 7, 1944, up to and including March 20, 1945. Distinguished Service Order 1 Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire 5 Distinguished Service Cross 56 Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire 5 Conspicuous Gallantry Medal 1 George Medal 1 Distinguished Service Medal 57 British Empire Medal 22 Mention in Dispatches- Officers 174 Ratings 261 Foreign Awards 5 Total 588



DeWolf, Harry George, Captain, R.C.N., 123 Range Road, Ottawa, Ont., 3 May, 1944.



Carter, Roderick Chrysler, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N. V.R., Ottawa, Ont. (Toronto), 1 January, 1945. LePage, Theodore Nelson, Lieut. Cdr.. R.C.N. V.R., 2592 Nelson Ave. W., Vancouver, B.C., 3 May, 1944. Palmer, Ivor James Llewellyn, Lieut. Cdr. (E), R.C.N.R., Montreal, Que., 14 November, 1944. Pickard, Anthony Fenwick, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.R., South Porcupine, N.S., 8 June, 1944. Rankin, Angus Hetherington, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N. V.R., Vancouver, B.C. 8 June, 1944.



Balfrey, Charles Patrick, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.R., 165 Longueil St., St. Jean d'Iberville, P.Q., 20 March, 1945. Benoit, Cecil Julian, Lieut., R.C.N., Halifax, N.S., 14 November, 1944. Bishop, Lennox Craig, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Sherbrooke, Que., 14 November, 1944. Bishop, Lennox Craig (1st Bar), 26 December, 1944. _ Boulton, Angus George, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.V.R., Russell, Man., 1 January, 1945. Bradley, James Richard, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Cayuga Avenue, Port Credit, Out., 20 March, 1945. Brock, Frederick, A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.V.R., Rothesay, N.B., 6 March, 1945. Budge, Patrick David, Lieut., R.C.N., Halifax, N.S., 29 August, 1944. Burk, Charles Arthur, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., 43 Gormley Avenue, Toronto, Ont., 2 May, 1944. Burk, Charles Arthur (1st Bar), 14 November, 1944. , Burk, Charles Arthur (2nd Bar), 26 December, 1944. Burke, Cornelius, A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.V.R., 1290 Robson Street, Vancouver, B.C., 30 May, 1944. Burke, Cornelius (1st Bar), 26 January, 1945. Campbell, Hugh, A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.R., Toronto, Ont., 26 December, 1944. Cosh, DigbyRex Bell, A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.V.R., 316 O'Connor St., Ottawa, Ont., 30 May, 1944. Coughlin, Clifton Rexford, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N. V.R., Ottawa, Ont., 18 July, 1944. Davie, John Chapman, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Duncan, B.C., 14 November, 1944. DeWolf, Harry George, D.S.O., Captain, R.C.N., Ottawa, Ont., 29 August, 1944. „ m Draney, Robert William, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.R., New Westminster, B.C., 12 September, 1944. Fraser, James Philip, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.R., Halifax, N.S., 4 July, 1944. Fuller, Thomas George, D.S.C. (1st Bar), A/Cdr., R.C.N.V.R., 300 Somerset St., W„ Ottawa, Ont., 4 April, 1944. Fuller, Thomas George (2nd Bar), 5 September, 1944. Gooderham, William George, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 18 July, 1944. Groos, David Walter, A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., (Surrey, England), 1 January', 1945. Hadrill, Peter Geoffrey, Lieut.. R.C.N.V.R., Montreal, Que., 28 November, 1944. Heslam, Richard Murray, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Halifax, N.S., 14 November, 1944. 408 COMMONS Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry D.S.C.-Con. Hibbard, James C., D.S.C. (1st Bar), Cdr., R.C.N., Halifax, N.S., 14 November, 1944. Howitt, David Mickle, A/Lieut.. R.C.N.V.R., Kings Bridge Road, St. John's, Newfoundland, 20 March, 1945. Kelly, George, Lieut., R.C.N.R., Northumberland, England, 1 January, 1945.King. Clarence Aubrey, D.S.O., D.S.C. (1st Bar), Cdr., R.C.N.R., Oliver, B.C., 24 October, 1944. Kirkpatrick, J. R. H., Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.Y.R., 128 St. George Street, Toronto, Ont., 7 March, 1944. Ladner, Thomas Ellis, Lieut.. R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Ladner, Thomas Ellis (1st Bar), 26 January, 1945. Lavr, Charles Anthony, A/Lieut. Cdr.,R.C.N.V.R., 220 Grande Allee, Quebec, Que.,29 August, 1944. Lincoln, John Hobart, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Calgary, Alta., 4 July, 1944. Mackay, Thomas Colson, Lieut., R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 15 August, 1944. Maitland. John Douglas, A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.V.R.. 1277 West 33 Avenue, Vancouver, B.C., 30 May, 1944. Maitland, John Douglas (1st Bar), 26 January, 1945. Martyn, W. H., D.S.C. (1st Bar), A/Lieut. Cdr., (A), R.N., Calgary, Alta., 5 September, 1944. Mawer. Charles Needham, Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.V.R., Calgary, Alta., 29 August, 1944. Parker, Charles Rodger, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R.. 76 Weyburn Crescent, Toronto, Ontario, 30 May, 1944. Pavillard, Louis Raymond , A/Lieut. Cdr., R.C.N.R.. Halifax, N.S., 19 December, 1944. Plomer, James, D.S.C. (1st Bar), A/Commander, R.C.N.V.R.. 593 McMillan Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 18 April, 1945. Prentice, James Douglas, D.S.O., A/Captain, R.C.N., Victoria. B.C., 28 November, 1944. Prentice, James Douglas (1st Bar), 5 December, 1944. Rayner, Herbert Sharpies, D.S.C. (1st Bar), A/Gaptain, R.C.N., Bedford, N.S., 29 August, 1944. Stacey, William Roland, Lt. Cdr., R.C.N.R., 2045 Whyte Avenue, Vancouver, B.C., 20 March, 1945. . Stead. Gordon Wilson. D.S.C. (1st Bar), A/Lieut. Cdr.. R.C.N.V.R.. 2908 Oak St„ Vancouver, B.C.. 30 May, 1944. Stephen, George Hay, O.B.E., D.S.C. (1st Bar), A/Cdr., R.C.N.R., Montreal, Que., 15 August, 1945. Storrs, Anthony Hubert Gleadow, A/Com-mander, R.C.N.R., Victoria, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Storrs. Anthony Hubert Gleadow, (1st Bar), 13 February, 1945. Stubbs, John Hamilton, D.S.O., Lt. Cdr., R.C.N., Kaslo, B.C., 11 July, 1944. Wadsworth. Rein Boulton, Cdr.. R.C.N.V.R. (ret'd), 6 Castlefrank Road, Toronto, Ont., 30 May, 1944. Webber, Reginald Arnand, Lt. Cdr., R.C.N., Vancouver, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Willson, William Herbert, A/Lt. Cdr., R.C.N., Calgary, Alta., 5 December, 1944. Campbell, Ross, Lieut., R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 15 January, 1945.



Arsenault, James William, Mate, R.C.N.R, Grindstone, Magdalen Island, Que., 8 June, 1944. Baker, Herman, A/Skipper Lt., R.C.N.R., Yarmouth North, N.S., 8 June, 1944. Darrach, Claude Kenneth, Skipper Lieut., R.C.N.R., Herring Cove, N.S., 8 June, 1944. Forster, Dennis Thompson, A/Lt. Cdr. (E), R.C.N., Enderby, B.C., 26 December, 1944. Idiens, Leonard, Sub-Lt., R.C.N.V.R., Campbell River, B.C., 8 June, 1944. C. G.M. Kerwin, Michael Roderick, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-32313, Billings Bridge, Ont., 14 November, 1944. George Medal Robertson, Owen Connor, Captain, R.C.N.R., Halifax, N.S., 8 June, 1944. D. S.M. Abbott, Douglas, C.P.O., R.C.N., 2479, Victoria, B.C., 11 July, 1944. Abbott, Douglas. D.S.M. (1st Bar), Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., 2479, Victoria, B.C., 29 August, 1944. Babineau, D. B., C.P.O., R.C.N., 2857, Halifax, N.S., 3 October, 1944. Badger, Edward, P.O., R.C.N.V.R., V-7899, Toronto, Ont., 18 July, 1944. Barker, Douglas William, C.P.O., R.C.N., 2827, 961 Cowiclian St., Victoria, B.C., 20 March, 1945. Bedard, Paul. C.P.O., Writer, R.C.N., 40828, Greenock, Scotland, and Mattawa, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Bloomfield, G. H., Yeo of Sigs., R.C.N.V.R., V-9856, Winnipeg, Man., 3 October, 1944. Boyle, James, C.P.O., R.C.N., X-1918, Canaan Station, Westmorland County, N.B., 1 January, 1945. Brewster, Bernard Edward, Leading Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-17355, Woodstock, Out.. 1 January, 1945. Brown. Ernest Thomas, A/Leading Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-23731, Lachine, P.Q., 5 December, 1944. Bushfield, William Arthur, Able Seaman, R.C.N., 4657, Stratford, Ont., 29 August, 1944. Candy, George Watson, C.P.O., Torpedo Gunner's Mate, R.C.N. 2360, Victoria B.C., 28 November, 1944. Carroll, George Alvin, P.O., R.C.N., 40563, Bagot. Man., 14 November, 1944. Craig. Frances Dudley, Able Seaman, V-32905, Kamsack, Sask., 18 July. 1944. Deane, Robert Crothers, V-50218, Able Seaman (ty) R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 3 October, 1944. Dublaclc, William, V-47341, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver. B.C., 29 August, 1944. El well, J. B., Ord. Art. II, R.C.N.V.R., V-30802, New Westminster, B.C.. 3 October, 1944. Emberley, Percy, E.R.A., 2nd Class A-2290, R.C.N.R.. Halifax, N.S., 28 November, 1944. Firkins, Whitney, V-30236. C.P.O.. Cook (S), R.C.N.V.R.. Victoria, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Forrester, Thomas Houston, V-50539. A/Ldg. Stoker (M) R.C.N.V.R., 164 Street, Nanaimo, B.C., 20 June, 1944. Gill, Leslie Francis, V-30176. A/Chief Ordnance Artificer, R.C.N.V.R., Victoria. B.C. 14 November, 1944. Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry D.S.M.-Con. Goodhew, W.J., M.M., R.C.N.V.R., V-39152, Halifax, N.S., 3 October, 1944. Gravelle, Joseph, P.O., Steward V-12603, R.C.N.V.R., Edmonton, Alta., 1 January, 1945. Haagenson, Lloyd Palmer Ambrose, A/Ldg. Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-11712, Sanctuary, Saskatchewan, 20 March, 1945. Haywood, James Mervin, 40727, A/Chief Ordnance Artificer, R.C.N., Port Arthur, Ont., 29 August, 1944. Kaminski. John Joseph, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-38104, Stettler, Alta., 19 December, 1944. Lipton, John Francis, C.P.O., R.C.N., 2851, Stellarton, N.S., 10 October, 1944. Longbottom, Arthur, E.R.A. Ill, V-10650, Moose Jaw, Sask., 18 July, 1944. MacIntyre, Roderick James, Acting Petty Officer, R.C.N., 3137, Bawlf, Alta., 24 October, 1944. . Mackenzie, James Wilson McLeod, Leading Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-24415, 758 Whytold Road, St. James, Man., 20 March, 1945. Masters, F. A., A/B, R.C.N.V.R., V-49589, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ont., 3 October, 1944. Montgomery, William Merrill, C.P.O., R.C.N., 2561, Victoria, B.C., 14 November, 1944. Moon, George Cyril, P.O., R.C.N., 3134, Victoria, B.C., 15 August, 1944. Nunn, Allen, A/B. R.C.N., 4118, Vancouver, B.C., 11 April, 1944. Pederson,. Magnus, V-11549. Ordnance Artificer II, R.C.N.V.R., Victoria, B.C., 29 August, 1944. Perkins, Elwyn, Petty Officer, R.C.N., 3449, Victoria, B.C., 15 August, 1944. Reid, William Wilson, A/Ldg. Smn., R.C.N.V.R. V-32837, Calgary, Alta., 29 August, 1944. Richards, Harold Douglas, Chief Stoker, R.C.N., 21925, Victoria, B.C., 15 August, 1944. Richards, Harold Douglas, D.S.M., (1st Bar), 14 November, 1944. Rickard. John Herren, A/B, V-16076, R.C.N.V.R., Port Arthur, Ont., 4 July, 1944. Royds, William Edward, Ldg. Smn., R.C.N.V.R., V-27580, 127 Eastbourne Ave., Toronto, Ont., 20 March, 1945. Salsiccioli. Peter Paul, C.E.R.A., R.C.N., 21602, Trail, B.C., 28 November, 1944. Saunders, Frederick William, C.P.O., R.C.N., 2614, London. England, 14 November, 1944. Starr, John, Ldg. Signalman, V-24919, R.C.N. V.R., Winnipeg. Man., 18 July, 1944. Steen. Charles Scott, A/P.O., R.C.N .V.R., V-24734, Dauphin, Man., 12 September, 1944. Stephenson, Thomas, A/B, V-17675, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ontario, 4 July, 1944. Stone. Daniel George. A/B, R.C.N.V.R., V-9998, 693 Jessie Ave., Winnipeg, Man., 20 March, 1945. . Stone, Leonard Sidney, C.P.O. Tel., R.C.N., 2178, Victoria, B.C., 29 August, 1944. Stoner, Beverley Murray, A/B, V-48169, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 4 July, 1944. Stubbins, Albert George, Ldg. Smn., R.C.N.V.R. V-40004, Humberstone, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Taylor, David Swanson, C.P.O., R.C.N., 3393, New Westminster, B.C., 29 August, 1944. Tennant, D„ A/B, R.C.N.V.R., V-31723, Hamilton, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Walker, Murray Hutchinson, A/P.O., R.C.N., 4019, London, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Watson, William James Brown, A/B. R.C.N. V.R., V-23372, Rosemount, Que., 5 December, 1944. D..S.M.-Con. White, Robert Edward, Ldg. Smn., R.C.N. 4127, Orillia, Ont., 15 August. 1944. Wispinski, Peter Paul, A/Ldg. Smn., R.C.N. V.R., V-43955, Haight, Alta., (Edmonton), 29 August, 1944. Wright, James Bernard, A/A.B., R.C.N.V.R., V-26288, New Glasgow, N.S. 29 August, 1944.



Allan, Peter Christie, C.E.RA., R.C.N.V.R., V-10347, Weyburn, Sask., 8 June, 1944. Aves, Franl? Edward, C.P.O., R.C.N., 2617, Preston, Ont. 8 June, 1944. Ball, James Ramsay, Chief Shipwright, R.C.N. V.R., V-25218, Halifax, N.S., 26 December, 1944. Baulne, Joseph Emile Rene, A/B. R.C.N.V.R., V-6893, Hull, Que., 5 December, 1944. Biddle, Henry, C.P.O., R.C.N.V.R., V-10186, Regina, Sask., 8 June, 1944. Blandin, Rene Alex, A/Stoker, P.O., R.C.N.R., A-1273, Dartmouth, N.S., 12 September, 1944. Boyd. Alfred Albert, E.R.A. IV, R.C.N.R., A-5361, Montreal, Que., 1 January, 1945. Butland, Clarence, A/P.O., R.C.N.V.R., V-5308, Verdun, Que., 1 January. 1945. Campbell, Albert Bruce, A/B., R.C.N.R., (F.R.) F.R. 244, Victoria, B.C., 8 June, 1944. Carson, William Spence, C. Stoker P.O. (F.F.), Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Cox, William John, Shipwright III, R.C.N.V.R., V-40761, Montreal, Que. 12 September 1944. Curtis, Edward George, Shipwright R.C.N. 2nd Class 40811, Victoria, B.C., 19 December, 1944. McNally, Robert Vardon, A/Able Seaman, R.C. N.V.R., V-62756, Toronto, Ont., 6 February, 1945. Pickering, William Clifton, C.P.O., R.C.N.R., A-2654, Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Roberts, Allen John Ldg. Cook (S), R.C.N.V.R., V-36211, Pov'ell River, B.C., 8 June, 1944. Rowe, John Joseph, Chief Stoker, R.C.N.V.R., V-23454, Cornwall, Ont., 27 February, 1944. Sainsbury, Edward Stephen, C.P.O., R.C.N.V.R., V-959g, Halifax, N.S., 19 December. 1944. Scott, Peter Wilson, A/Ldg. Smn., R.C.N.V.R., V-7623 Toronto, Qnt., 12 September, 1944. Smith, William C.P.O., R.C.N., 2333, Winnipeg, Man., 1 January, 1945. Tait, John Rowan, A/Elect. Art. IV, R.C.N.V.R., V-13882. Calgary, Alta., 26 December, 1944. Wenzel, William Max, Able Seaman, R.C.N. V.R., V-38269, Elk Point, Alta., 1 January, 1945. Wilson. Frederick William, A/Ldg., Smn., R.C. N.V.R., V-24839, Transcona, Man., 12 September, 1944. Mention in Dispatches-Officers Annesley, John Crispo Leekie, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Montreal, Que., 29 August, 1944. Annesley, John Crispo Leekie, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Montreal, Que., 15 August, 1944. . Arnason, Steinthor Arni, Warrant Engineer, R.C.N.R., 54 Bloomfield Street, Halifax, N.S., 1 January, 1945. Atherton, Thomas Herbert, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Parry Sound, Ont., 18 July, 1944. Audette, Louis de la Chesnaye, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Quebec, Que., 1 January, 1945. [DOT] _ Baird, Samuel Lawson, A/Lieutenant Commander (E), R.C.N.V.R., Winnipeg, Man., 28 November, 1944. 410 COMMONS Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry Mention in Dispatches-Officers-Con. Barrett, Raiffe Dillon, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Glyn P.O., Victoria, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Barrick, Geoffrey Herbert, Gunner, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 14 November, 1944. Bauld, H. S. D., Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Halifax, N.S., 3 October, 1944. Bell, Gordon, Commissioned Engineer, R.C.N.R., Sudbury, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Bell, Ian Hunter, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 8 June, 1944, Berry, Peter Cushing, A/Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Ottawa, Ont., 28 November, 1944. Biggs, Jeffrey Reginald, Lieutenant, R.C.N.R., Montreal, P.Q., 1 January, 1945. Blanchard, Henry Blair, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., 362 Morris Street, Halifax, N.S., 20 March, 1945. Bolus, Hal Baldwin, Lieutenant (E), R.C.N., Ottawa, Ont., 11 July, 1944. Boyer, Frederick John, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., 257 Inglewood Drive, Toronto, Ont., 23 May, 1944. Boyer, Frederick John (Posthumous), Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R. 21 November, 1944. Boyle, Douglas Seaman, Lieutenant, R.C.N., Revelstoke, B.C., 18 July, 1944. Brock, Jeffry Vanstone, Commander, R.C.N.V.R., 75 fiavard Avenue, Winnipeg, Man. Brooks-Hill, Frederick Bancroft, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Burk, Charles Arthur (D.S.C. and 2 Bars), Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 30 January, 1945. Burke, Cornelius, D.S.C., A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 11 July, 1944. Burrows, Freeman Elkins, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Buxton, Sydney William, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 8 June, 1944. Campbell, Gordon Duncan, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Victoria, B.C., 8 June, 1944. Chaffey, Charles Donald, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Montreal, Que., 26 December, 1944. Charles, D'Arcy Allen Adsit Hughes, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., North Hattig, P.Q., 26 December, 1944. Charles, John Alexander, Lieutenant, R.C.N., Rouleau, Saskatchewan, 2 January, 1945. Chenoweth, Richard Cassels, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Montreal, Que., 1 January, 1945. Chipman, William Pennock, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., 173 Stewart Street, Ottawa, Ont., 13 June, 1944. Clarance. Charles Douglas, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 3 October, 1944. Coates, John Jeffery, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Paris, Ont., 10 October, 1944. Conrad, Ralph Anderson, Commissioned Engineer, R.C.N.R., McNab's Island, Halifax, N.S., 1 January, 1945. Corbett, John Harper, Lieutenant. R.C.N.V.R., 10951-123 Street, Edmonton, Alta., 20 March 1945. Cosburn, Ronald Thomas, Prob. Sub-Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Cosh, Digby Rex Bell (Deceased), A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., 316 O'Connor Street, Ottawa, Ont., 30 May, 1944. Coughlin, Clifton Rexford, D.S.C. (Deceased), Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Ottawa, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Cuthbert. James, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Vancouver, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Davis, Donald, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Victoria, B.C., 26 December, 1944. Davis, James Sinclair, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Oakville, Ont., 8 June, 1944. De Wolf, Henry George, D.S.O., D.S.C., Captain, R.C.N., Bedford, N.S., 10 October, 1944. De Wolf, Henry George, D.S.O., D.S.C., Captain, R.C.N., Ottawa, Out. (Bedford, N.S.), 14 November, 1944. Dolmage, Wilfred Gordon, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., 1835 Barclay Street, Vancouver, B.C., 3 May, 1944. Donald. James Olouston, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., 79 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man., 3 May, 1944. Dunn, James Alexander, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 4 July, 1944. Earnshaw, Eric Phillip, Lieutenant, R.C.N., Ottawa, Out., 1 January, 1945. Easton, A. H., D.S.C., Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R. (T), London, Ont., 3 October, 1944. Edwards, Gordon Cheeseman, A/Lieutenant Commander (A), R.C.N.V.R., Montreal. Que. (Southsea, Hants, Eng.), 1 January, 1945. Edwards, Thomas Bottrell, A/Lieutenant Commander (T), R.C.N.R., Cornwall, England, 28 November, 1944. Ellis, Martin Henry, A/Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Halifax, N.S. (Victoria, B.C.), 1 January. 1945. Evans, Philip Cabell, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Miami, Florida, 8 June, 1944. Everett, A. W„ Lieutenant, R.C.N., Winnipeg, Man., 3 October, 1944. Farmer, James, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., London, Ont., 4 July, 1944, Ferguson, Alexander John, Lieutenant, R.C.N.R. Hantsport, Hants Co., N.S., 8 June, 1944. Flitton, Ralph Johnston, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R. Mount Royal, Que., 5 December, 1944. Fowler, Frederick Knight, Lieutenant. R.C.N. V.R., St. John, N.B., 2 January, 1945. Freeman, Russell, Gunner (T), R.C.N., Hamilton, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Frewer, John De La Fosse, A/Lieutenant Commander R.C.N.V.R., 196 Indian Road, Toronto, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Frewer, Philip George, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 15 August, 1944. Fuller, Thomas George. D.S.C. and 2 Bars, A/Commander R.C.N.V.R., Ottawa, Ont., 5 December, 1944. Gardner, Alan, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Calgary, Alta., 8 June, 1944. Gibson, William Simpson, Lieutenant (E), R.C.N.V.R., 86 Cheritan Ave., Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Gladwell, James William, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., 1 Surrey Gardens, Montreal, Que., 30 May, 1944. Goad, James Barclay, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 26 December, 1944. Godfrey, Valentine Stuart, Captain, R.C.N., Victoria. B.C., 14 November, 1944. Godwin, Donald Harold, Probationary SubLieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Hamilton, Ont., 5 December, 1944. Goodwin. Geoffrey Lionel, Electrical Lieutenant (R), R.C.N.V.R., R.R. No. 3, St. Catharines, Qnt., 8 June, 1944. Gould, Grant Allenby, Surgeon Lieutenant (T), R.C.N.V.R., Winnipeg, Man. (Uxbridge, Ont.) 17 October, 1944. Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry Mention in Dispatches-Officers-Con. Grant, H. T. W., D.S.O., Captain, R.C.N., Ottawa, Ont., 28 November, 1944. Gray, Robert Hampton, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Nelson, B.C., (Transcona, Man.), 16 January, 1945. Groos, David Walter, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 14 November, 1944. Groos, David Walter, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 3 October, 1944. Groos, Harold Victor William, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 18 July, 1944. Hall, George Stanley, A/Commander, R.C.N.R., Esquimalt, B.C. (Halifax, N.S.), 1 January, 1945. Hall, Kenneth William Newman, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Westmount, P.Q., 26 December, 1944. Harding, John, Lieutenant Commander, R.C. N.R., Montreal, Que., 1 January, 1945. Harley, Frank. Lieutenant (E), R.C.N.R., Glasgow, Scotland, 18 July, 1944. Harris, Herbert Cecil, A/Warrant Engineer, Moncton, New Brunswick, 8 June, 1944. Hart, Richard Wallace, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R. Belleville, Out., 8 June, 1944. Hayes, William Prine, Lieutenant, R.C.N., Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 14 November, 1944. Heayberd, Valentine Maxwell, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Montreal, Que., 14 November, 1944. Heslam, Richard Murray, Lieutenant, R.C.N V.R., Montreal, Que., 11 July, 1944. Hill, Henry Knox, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Kingston, Ont., 4 July, 1944. Hill, Henry Knox, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Kingston, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Hinehcliffe, Cecil Irving (R.D.), Commander (E), R.C.N.R., Victoria, B.C., 26 December, 1944. Hunter, Robert Laird Borden. Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Kamsaek, Sask. (East Florence Ville, N.B.), 1 January, 1945. Jackson, Thomas James, A/Pay Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Jeffreys, David E., Lieutenant, R.C.N.R. (discharged), Swansea, Wales. 14 November, 1944. Jess, Robert Edmond, D.S.C., Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Quebec, Que., 1 January, 1945. Johnson, Rendell James Godschall, A/Com-mander, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Jones, Lloyd Irwin, Commissioned Gunner (T), R.C.N,, Vancouver, B.C., 15 August, 1944. Kaizer, George Murray, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Centreville, Kings Co., N.S., 1 January, 1945. Karr, Sand on Alexander, Warrant Engineer, R.C.N.R., Chemainus, B.C., 8 June, 1944. King, Clarence Aubrey, D.S.O., D.S.C., Commander, R.C.N.R., Oliver, B.C., 15 August, 1944. King, Dudley Gawen, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Victoria, B.C., 8 June, 1944. Kirkpatrick, Archibald Miller, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Windsor, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Kirkpatrick, James Ralph Hilborn, D.S.C., Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Kitchener, Ont., 3 October, 1944. Knight, Vadim Michael Shaligo, Lieutenant (g), R.C.N.V.R., Halifax, N.S., 20 February, 1945. Kyle, Lome Samuel, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 14 November, 1944. Ladner, Thomas Ellis, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., 4850 Connaught Drive, Vancouver, B.C., 30 May, 1944. „ , Ladner, Thomas Ellis, D.S.C. and Bar, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 20 February, 1945. , Lamb, James Barrett, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 26 December, 1944. Law, Charles Anthony, A/Lieutenant Commander R.C.N.V.R., 220 Grand Allee, Quebec, P.Q., 30 May, 1944. Lay, Horatio Nelson, Captain, R.C.N., Walker-ton, Ont., 26 December, 1944. ' Layard, Arthur Frank Capel, D.S.O., Commander, R.N. (On loan to R.C.N. (St. John)), 27 February, 1945. Little, Fred, Gunner, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 15 August, 1944. _ _ Lucas, Francis William Tindall, Lieutenant Commander (s), R.C.N.V.R., Victoria, B.C., 27 February, 1945. McCully, W. S. T„ Lieutenant, R.C.N., London, Ont., 3 October, 1944. McKenzie, Ronald Orr, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Victoria, B.C. (Auckland, N.Z.), 1 January, 1945. McPhillips, W. C., Sub-Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., London, Ont., 3 October, 1944. McQuarrie, John Glover, Lieutenant, R.C.N.R., New Westminster, B.C., 8 June, 1944. MacLeod, Donald MacGregor, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Miami, Florida, 25 July, 1944. Mabee, Oliver Band, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 3 October, 1944. Mahoney, Richard Alexander, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Winnipeg, Man., 5 December, 1944. 1 Maitland, John Douglas, D.S.C., A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 12 September, 1944. Mawer, Charles Needham, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Calgary, Alta., 11 July, 1944. Maxwell, Herries Stirling, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Montreal, Que., 1 January, 1945. Mayne, Arthur Hugh Shaw, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Westmount, Que., 8 June. 1944. Meredith, Ralph Morton, Lieutenant. R.C.N.R., Dartmouth,. N.S., 26 December, 1944. Milburn, John Edwards. Lieutenant (T), R.C.N.V.R., Vancouver, B.C., 24 October, 1944. Miller, Jack, A/Warrant Engineer, R.C.N., Halifax, N.S., 18 July, 1944. Minogue, Howard Douglas, Lieutenant (E), R.C.N.V.R., Outremont, Que., 12 September, Moffat, William Purvis. Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Montreal, P.Q., 18 July, 1944. Monteith, Donald Joel, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Aylmer, Ont., 19 December, 1944. Naftel, Frederick Robb Knyvet, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Chateauguay Basin, Que., 8 June, 1944. Nixon, Charles Patrick, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 5 December, 1944. Nixon, Charles Patrick, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C., 18 July, 1944. Noseworthy, Frank George, Commissioned Engineer, R.C.N.V.R., Kenora, Ont., 19 December, 1944. O'Brien, John Barry, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Ottawa, Ont., 8 June, 1944. 412 COMMONS Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry Mention in Dispatches-Officers-Con. Osborne, Fred Francis, Lieutenant, R.C.N.R., Guysboro, N.S., 8 June, 1944. Percy, James Leslie, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Petersen, Charles, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Victoria, B.C., 5 December, 1944. Phillips, Geoffrey, Lieutenant (E), R.C.N., Ottawa, Ont., 29 August, 1944. Phillips, Raymond, Lieutenant, R.C.N., Ottawa, Ont., 29 August, 1944. Pickard, Hervert Marquis, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., 297 Yale Ave., Winnipeg, Man., 30 May, 1944. Platt, John Cleveland, A/Lieutenunt, R.C.N. V.R., Toronto, Out., 10 October, 1944. Pratt, James Charles, A/Lieutenanit Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Windsor, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Pringle, Roderick John Cornell, A/Commander (n) R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont. (Halifax, N.S.), I January, 1945. Quinn, Howard Lee, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Victoria, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Rayner, Herbert Sharpies, D.S.C. and Bar, A/Captain, R.C.N., Bedford, N.S. (St. Catharines), 10 October, 1944. Rayner, Herbert Sharpie®, D.S.C., A/Capbadn, R.C.N., St. Catharines, Ont. (Bedford, N.S.), II July, 1944. Robarts, John Parmenter, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., 931 Waterloo St., London, Ont., 23 May, 1944. Robinson, Stephen Clive, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Duncan, B.C.. 13 March, 1945. Ross, John Donald. A/Warrant Engineer, R.C.N.V.R., Fort William, Ont., 1 January, 1945. _ Ross. James Findlay, Sub-Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., 30 Willow St., Truro, N.S., 16 January, 1945. Russell, P. F. X.. Lieutenant, R.C.N., Halifax, N.S.. 14 November, 1944. Russell, P. F. X.. Lieutenant, R.C.N., Victoria, B.C. (Halifax, N.S.), 3 October, 1944. Scobie, Thomas Keith, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Ottawa, On,t., 14 November, 1944. Shaw, Harold Campbell, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Westmount, P.Q., 26 December, 1944. Spicer, William Wright, Lieutenant, R.C.N. V.R., Calgary, Alta. (Regina, Sask.), 1 January, 1945. Spinney, Charles Wallace, Lieutenant (SB), R.C.N.V.R., Kentville, N.S. 8 June, 1944. Stacey, William Roland, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Vancouver, B.C., 8 June, 1944. Sutton, Arthur William, Lieutenant (T), R.C.N.V.R., Saskatoon, Sask., 31 October, 1944. Sylvester, Roy Howard, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Charlottetown, P.E.I., 1 January, 1945. Taylor, James, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Montreal, P.Q, (Ottawa, Ont.), 1 January, 1945. Thompson, Tbeo Walter, Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Halifax, N.S,, 12 September. 1944. Thomson. George Alexander Victor, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Victoria, B.C., 26 December, 1944. Thomson, Walter Herbert Bruce, A/Lieutenant Commander. R.C.N.V.R., Hamilton, Out. (Kingston. Out.), 1 January, 1945. Timbrel], Robert Walter, D.S.C., Lieutenant (A/S) R.C.N., Hollybum, B.C. (Vancouver, B.C.). 5 December. 1944. Todd. Terence Charles, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., 18 Julv. 1944. Victoria. B.C. Ward. Walter George, Elect. Lieutenant (R) R.C.N.V.R., Peterborough, Ont.. 14 November. 1944. TMr. A. L. Macdonald.] Watson, Alan Graeme, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Out., 29 August, 1944. Watson, John Manuel, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.R., Owen Sound, Ont., 15 August, 1944. Welch, Albert Gordon, Lieutenant (N), R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Welland, Robert Philip, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., McCreary, Man., 14 November, 1944. Weyman, Ronald C., A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 7 November, 1944. Whiting, T., A/Warrant Engineer, R.C.N.V.R., Brantford, Ont., 3 October, 1944. Williams, John Elliott, A/Warrant Engineer, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 18 July, 1944. Williams, Norman Lindsay, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., Winnipeg, Man., 1 January, 1945. Willson, William Herbert, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N., Calgary, Alta., 28 November, 1944. Wilson, Harry Parks, Lieutenant. R.C.N.V.R., 21 Brant Street, Orillia, Ont., 30 May, 1944. Woods, John Robinson, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., 30 Avondale Road, Toronto, Ont., 2 May, 1944. Woods, John Robinson, Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., 30 Avondale Road, Toronto, Ont., 20 June, 1944. Wright, Charles Edmond, A/Lieutenant Commander, R.C.N.V.R., Toronto, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Mention in Dispatches-Ratings Adams, John Sylvester, A/Leading Cook (s). R.C.N.R., A-2077. St. Peters, Richmond Co., Cape Breton, N.S., 1 January, 1945. Alerie, John George, Petty Officer, R.C.N.V.R., V-5626, Pte. St. Charles, Montreal, P.Q., 8 June, 1944. Allan, John Neil Murdoch, Ldg. Sick Berth Attendant R.C.N.V.R.. V-4720, Hollyburn, B.C. (Vancouver), 1 January, 1945. Anderson, Charles Malcolm, Sto. Petty Officer, R.C.N.R., A-2436, Owen Sound, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Anderson. Frank Philip, Sailmakers Mate, R.C.N.R., A-1241, Burgeo, Newfoundland, 26 December, 1944. Andrews, Alfred John, Yeoman of Signals, R.C.N., 2946, Calgary, Alta., 29 August, 1944. Armstrong, Frederick Thomas, A/Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-61371, Utterson, Ontario, 29 August, 1944. Armstrong, Robert Edgar, Petty Officer, R.C.N., 4022, Trenton, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Artmont. Peter, A/Ld. Smn.. R.C.N.V.R., V-17281, London, Ont., 10 October, 1944. Artmont, Peter, London, Ont., 29 August, 1944. Aveling. William Haig, Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., 2908, Burnaby, B.C., 14 November, 1944. Baker. Robert Reginald, A/Petty Officer, R.C.N.V.R., V-18007, Kingston, Ont., 15 August, 1944. Baleh, Kenneth James, E.R.A., 3rd Class, R.C.N.V.R., V-37499, London. Ont., 26 December, 1944. Barker, Robert Alexander, Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., 2112 Esquimalt, B.C., 29 August, 1944. Barrett, Fred, Chief Petty Officer, Cook (s), R.C.N., (Official Number 40455), Victoria, B.C. (Eburne, B.C.). 26 December, 1944. Bazley, Albert Samuel, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-37024, Toronto, Out., 29 August, 1944. . Naval Services-Awards for Gallantry Mention in Dispatches-Ratings-Con. Bell, Clifford John, Petty Officer, R.C.N.V.R., V-531G, Montreal, P.Q., 1 January, 1945. Bell, Percy Alexander. A/C E.R.A., R.C.N.V.R., V-25470, Saint John, N.B., I January, 1945. Belliveau, Joseph Gerald Bernes, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-50977, Campbelltown, N.B., 26 December, 1944. Berryman, John Desmond, A/Leading Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-17162, London Ont., 15 August, 1944. Bingham, Harold Wesley, A/Petty Officer Coxswain R.C.N.V.R, V-24409, Indian Head, Sask., 1 January, 1945. Blackburn, James William, A/'Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-49988, Ottawa, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Blair, Douglas Duncan, A/Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-43301, Oshawa, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Bland, James Gordon, Petty Officer Cook (s), R.C.N.V.R., V-30186, Simeoe, Ontario (Grand Forks, B.C.), 1 January, 1945. Bockus, Donald Roland, Stoker Petty Officer, R.C.N.R., A-4117, Montreal, Que., 26 December, 1944. Boniowski, Bert Thomas, Leading Sick Berth Attendant, R.C.N.V.R., (Official Number, V-37064), East Kildonan, Man., 27 February, 1945. Bourne, Leslie Norman, A/Ldg. Smn., R.C.N., 4023, Vancouver, B.C., 18 July, 1944. Boutilier, Clyde, B.E.M., E.ll.A. 2/c R.C.N.V.R., V-25257, Halifax, N.S. (Bridgeton, Maine, U. S.A.), 14 November, 1944. Bowden, James, Chief Petty Officer (T.C.) R.C. N.R., (Official Number A-4787), Windsor, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Bowyer, M. II., Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R. V-10607, Hazlet, Sask., 3 October. 1944. Boyd Clifford Douglas, A/Petty Officer, R.C.N. V. R. V-2741, Saint John, N.B., 18 July, 1944. Brace, Ernest Robert, A/Petty Officer, R.C.N. V.R. V-23145, Verdun, Que,, 18 July, 1944. Brown, Alexander, Stoker Petty Officer R.N., (Official Number D/KX 81709), Winnipeg, Man,, 4 April, 1944. Brown, David Edgar, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-51452, Eburne, B.C., (Posthumous), 5 December 1944. Brown, David Henry, Leading Seaman, R.C.N. V.R., V-19206, Roseland, Ont., 5 December, 1944. (Posthumous). Brown, Earl Clarence, Petty Officer Steward, R.C.N.V.R., V-25256, Endaka, B.C., 1 January, 1945. Brown, Ernest Thomas, A/Ldg. Smn., R.C.N. V.R., V-23731, Lachine, P.Q., 28 November, 1944. Bryne, John Eugene, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-49186, Toronto, Ont., 26 December, 1944. Bungay, Creighton Benjamin, A/Ldg. Smn., R.C. N.R., A-5101, Cape Breton, N:S., 15 August, 1944. Burch, Charles Philip, Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., X-2016, London, England, 29 August, 1944. Butler, Edmund Harold, A/Ldg. Telegraphist, R.C.N.V.R., V-7054, Toronto, Ont., 18 July, 1944. Cameron, Chester Henry, Ldg. Smn., R.C.N.R., A-2352, Port Colbourne, Ont., 28 November, 1944. Carey, Arthur Rutherford, Stoker, 1/c R.C.N. V.R., V-40856, Winnipeg, Man., 1 January, 1945. Carrington, Arthur John, Chief Petty Officer, Tel. R.C.N.V.R., V-13194, Calgary, Alta., 18 July, 1944. Chapman, Francis Reginald, Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., 3165, 26 December, 1944, Edmonton, Alta. Chipperfield, Walter Francis, Electrical Artificer 4/c, R.C.N.V.R., V-46377, Calgary, Alta., 26 December, 1944. Coke, Robert Henry, Petty Officer, R.C.N.V.R., V-6699, Toronto, Ont., 19 December, 1944. Cole, James William, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-89S9, Hamilton, Ont., 14 November, 1944. Coleman, Charles Robert, Stoker 1/c R.C.N. V.R., V-46725, Victoria, B.C., 5 December, 1944. Connolly, James Francis, Able Seaman, R.C.N., 4264, Vancouver, B.C., 24 October, 1944. Cowan, Ronald, Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., 2670, Winnipeg, Man., 1 January, 1945. Crossi, Jack Alexander, Petty Officer Telegraphist, R.C.N.V.R. (Official Number V-30004), Victoria, B.C., 5 December, 1944. Cummings, William Alfred, A/Ldg. Stoker, R.C.N.V.R., V-947, Toronto, Ont., 15 August, 1944. Cundell, D'Arcy, Able Seaman, R.C.N.V.R., V-6607, Ottawa, Ont., 28 November, 1944. Cuthbert, Thomas Frederick, A/Leading Seaman. R.C.N.V.R., V-24058, Winnipeg, Man., 10 October, 1944. Dann, George William. Able Seaman (Radar I) R.C.N.V.R., V-17463, London, Ont., 1 January, 1945. Davey, John Henry, Petty Officer R.C.N.V.R., V-1071, Charlottetown, P.E.I., 1 January, 1945. Dempster, Lawrence Atherton, Petty Officer, R.C.N., 3782, Calgary, Alta., 11 July, 1944. Desrochers, Gabriel Symon, Stoker Petty Officer R.C.N.V.R., V-7976, Houston, Texas (Penetanguishene, Ont.), 1 January, 1945. Dibnah, Quentin Harold, Chief Petty Officer Writer, R.C.N., 40895, Winnipeg, Man., 1 January, 1945, Doyle, D. F., Chief Petty Officer, R.C.N., 2204, Halifax, N.S., 3 October, 1944. Drew, Gordon Albert, A/Ldg. Smn. R.D.F. 3, R.C.N. 3877, Victoria, B.C. (Calgary, Alta.), 1 January, 1945. Dryden, Albert Gordon, A/E.R.A. 4/c R.C.N. V.R., V-24854, Rainy River, Ont., 8 June, 1944. Dryden, Henry Norris, Chief Stoker, R.C.N., 21304, Halifax, NjS., 12 September, 1944. Duncan. George Edward, Shipwright 3/c R.C.N.V.R., V-39965, Lachute, P.Q., 14 November, 1944. Dunphy, Harold Edward, Chief Stoker Petty Officer, R.C.N.R., A2047, Kingston, Ont., 1 January, 1945, Eakins. John Smiley, Prob.-Sub-Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R., V-34738, Toronto, Ont., 5 December, 1944. Earthv. Bernard Alfred, Stoker Petty Officer, R.C.N.V.R., V-30278, Victoria, B.C., 26 December, 1944. Easter, Kenneth Lome, Stoker 1/c R.C.N.V.R., V-63523, Prescott, Ont,, 5 December, 1944. Edge, Harry, A/Petty Officer, R.C.N.V.R., V-12551. Edmonton, Alta. (Victoria, B.C.), 1 January, 1945. * Erriekson, Leonard Gustave, Chief Stoker, R.C.N.V.R.. V-12381, Edmonton, Alta., 1 January, 1945.


April 3, 1945