March 29, 1945

NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Associating our party with the

remarks of the Prime Minister on the occasion of the ending formally of the British commonwealth air training plan, I should like to indicate to the house that not only has this been a successful adventure in wartime cooperation among the various units of the commonwealth, but, if I may say so, it augurs well for the future relationships between commonwealth nations, because what we have been able to do together in time of war we shall surely be able to do similarly in time of peace in collaboration and cooperation.

The closing of the plan brings to my mind at once two things. One is that while these boys have been trained to the extent, as the Prime Minister has said, of 150,000, there have been, if my memory serves me correctly-I have not the records with me-losses among

Canadian boys who have participated in that plan to the extent of something like 12,000 since the plan went into operation. We must to-day recognize that the loss in men is heavy in war; and the fact that we have lost 12,000 from the flower of our manhood' in air operations shows the heavy drain that is made upon our nation in times like these.

Then there was the other matter mentioned by some of the prime ministers of other dominions, namely, the associations that have been built up and cemented and welded by the fact that so many of the boys from other parts of the commonwealth have been received in such a cordial manner and shown the splendid hospitality of Canadian homes. That seems to me to be one of the practical results of the commonwealth air training plan from the social angle. Therefore, Mr. Speaker, in joining with the Prime Minister's remarks I say to you that we are hopeful in Canada that many of these young men will be Canadian citizens in the future. Having sampled our hospitality and knowing something of the great resources and opportunities of our country, we are hoping that they will come here, settle down and become citizens of Canada. If they do they will be royally welcomed.

Topic:   AIR TRAINING PLAN
Subtopic:   WINDING-UP CEREMONIES THROUGHOUT CANADA- MESSAGES FROM BRITAIN, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

We, too, would like to associate ourselves with the remarks of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) and the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon). As this great plan draws to an end it is indeed gratifying to the people of Canada that the Prime Minister has received the messages he read to the house to-day. As I sat listening to these messages I thought of the young men from all the commonwealth countries, and indeed from countries that were occupied by the enemy, who have not only trained under this remarkable scheme-and I think the department responsible, and if I may say so, the former minister, should be remembered as having played a great part in this scheme-but who have sacrificed their lives. Quite a number of boys whom I had taught, and who were among the brightest lads that I have ever known, were trained under this plan. Many of them have sacrificed their lives. We should remember that- some of these boys could find no place in our social life before this war began. I think that we owe a debt to the educational institutions that prepared these boys. I hope that even if times become difficult again when the war ends, the views sometimes expressed in criticism of what were known as educational frills, or the suggestion that education was too

Air Training Plan

extended, will be largely silenced because of the part played by the products of our educational institutions in this great war.

Those of us who have travelled across the country during the war and have met these fine young Canadians and indeed young men from all the united nations, on the trains and in other places ought to pay tribute to their splendid behaviour. We are glad indeed to join in congratulating the department upon the planning of this remarkable scheme, and to say how pleased we are that we have been able to contribute in this important and successful branch of our armed services. The Prime Minister said it was one of the great contributions of this country. I am inclined to believe that history may regard it as Canada's greatest contribution to the common war effort,.

Topic:   AIR TRAINING PLAN
Subtopic:   WINDING-UP CEREMONIES THROUGHOUT CANADA- MESSAGES FROM BRITAIN, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

This is an occasion on which we can all justifiably feel much satisfaction. No matter what may be the party to which we belong, we must grant and should grant freely without grudging that it was a great move on the part of the government to establish this commonwealth air training plan. I think it calls, too, for a feeling of gratitude that Canada was guided to embark upon this plan which was ultimately found to- be sc* important in the final outcome of the war.

I cannot help thinking, however, that we should perhaps have sounded somewhere in parliament on this occasion a note of warning. I hope that the winding up of the commonwealth air training scheme does not indicate a disposition on the part of our government or of the British commonwealth in general to relax their effort too soon, before they are positive that this war is over. We British peoples have made many grievous mistakes in the past by failing to be adequately prepared for what might be a sudden and unexpected menace. I trust that we just do not wind up too soon, that we keep ourselves girded until we are positively sure that danger's dreadful night is past.

Topic:   AIR TRAINING PLAN
Subtopic:   WINDING-UP CEREMONIES THROUGHOUT CANADA- MESSAGES FROM BRITAIN, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
Permalink
LIB

John Gordon Ross

Liberal

Mr. J. G. ROSS (Moose Jaw):

I have not had an opportunity before to mention this, but this is the opportunity. Along with three other colleagues, the hon. member for Dan-forth (Mr. Harris), the hon. member for Vancouver East (Mr. Maclnnis), and the hon. member for Wood Mountain (Mr. Donnelly) I visited Australia and New Zealand last summer. We went to practically every city in these two dominions, and everywhere we went we were asked to take back with us an

expression of appreciation on the part of the people of those two countries for the way in which the Canadian people had treated the boys who were over here training under the air training plan.

Topic:   AIR TRAINING PLAN
Subtopic:   WINDING-UP CEREMONIES THROUGHOUT CANADA- MESSAGES FROM BRITAIN, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. E. G. HANSELL (Macleod):

I have had reason to observe the progress that has been made in this commonwealth air training scheme, having had no less than six air training schools situated in my constituency. The people of Canada through the respective administrations and the staffs of the various countries involved have indeed done a great job, and I am only a little sorry that the former Minister of National Defence for Air (Mr. Power) was not able to carry out his duties up to the present time. I think a good deal of credit is coming to him. I am pleased that the Prime Minister and others have made reference to those trained under this plan who have given their lives on the altar of sacrifice.

While the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) was reading a tribute to this air training scheme I happened to open a letter from a lady in Edmonton who had just lost a son. Enclosed was a little card in memory of her son, Donald F. McDonald, sergeant observer. As the Prime Minister was paying tribute to the boys who have lost their lives, I could not help thinking of the sacrifices that had been made by the mothers who had given their sons in their country's cause. I wonder if I may be permitted to put on Hansard two or three verses that evidently were written by this boy's mother:

In the sombre land of Germany,

They have laid my son to rest;

The 'wings' he won while here on earth Lie still upon his breast,

But his soul, the indestructible,

Flew far above the sod And joined the throng of worshippers Right at the feet of God!

Sleep peacefully, beloved son In earth's last little bed.

What matter that 'tis German soil Supports your lovely head-

Your Soul, by His eternal grace.

Hath seen the beauty of His face.

So rest, my dearest one, rest,

Your loved "crew" by your side,

That hallowed plot in Germany By your young blood sanctified,

Shall always and forever be Of Canada a part-

Your Canada, our Canada.

To -which you gave your heart!

Topic:   AIR TRAINING PLAN
Subtopic:   WINDING-UP CEREMONIES THROUGHOUT CANADA- MESSAGES FROM BRITAIN, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
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NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

In any air training plan the empire should come first as a unit, and then you can branch into the international field. All the bases should belong to the British empire. It is all right to let others use them, but we should retain sovereignty over all of them.

Labour Conditions-Farm Labour

Topic:   AIR TRAINING PLAN
Subtopic:   WINDING-UP CEREMONIES THROUGHOUT CANADA- MESSAGES FROM BRITAIN, AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND
Permalink

LABOUR CONDITIONS


STATEMENT IN REGARD TO FARM LABOUR On the orders of the day:


LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

On Tuesday the hon. member for Bow River (Mr. Johnston) and the hon. member for Macleod (Mr. Hansell) asked about the provision of labour for the opening farm season, and I would like to supplement what I stated in the course of the discussion on the supplementary estimates last evening.

Instructions were sent to all selective service offices across Canada that farm workers on temporary permits in other essential industries during the winter months must return to agriculture on April 1 or at subsequent dates mutually agreed upon by the provinces and ourselves. We shall appeal to men in other industries to reciprocate by assisting whenever possible during peak seasons on the farm. Local selective service officers have been given authority to direct any male worker from sixteen to sixty-five years of age into specified agricultural employment. Steps will be taken to move farm workers from less to more productive farms. Officials of the Department of Labour have already discussed a draft farm labour agreement with five of the provincial departments of agriculture, and the remaining discussions will be held very shortly.

We expect that the total commitments through these agreements for sharing expenditures on recruiting, transporting and placing farm labour within the provinces will exceed the total of last year, namely 3660,000. We plan again this year to arrange for the movement of workers between provinces to help meet urgent harvesting needs. The cost of this is borne by the dominion government. In addition we expect there will be a greater movement of farm workers within the provinces. One substantial incentive toward this end is a reduction in transportation charges, recently agreed to by the railways. This cost is shared by the dominion and the provinces.

Negotiations have already begun with farm labour officials in the United States for the movement of labour and harvesting outfits across our common border. We are also considering in cooperation with the provinces the recruiting of farm workers in Newfoundland to help in the maritime provinces.

We are now devising methods for a more complete check of men on farm postponements. This is being done to ensure that these men are making the type of contribution to farm production that we have a right to expect of them.

We plan to expand the use of prisoners of war labour in agriculture. Several new projects are now under consideration. No stone

will be left unturned in utilizing all other special sources of labour such as Indians, conscientious objectors and Canadian Japanese.

Members have knowledge of the reinforcements required for overseas. In view of this we cannot depend on as much assistance during the coming summer from the three services as we have secured during the past two seasons. I have, however, discussed this matter with each of the ministers of national defence. In the case of the air force the provisions for spring leave have again been put into effect. In view of increased commitments we shall not be able to count on any substantial assistance from the navy. From the army we have the assurance that the representatives of the district officers commanding appearing before the mobilization boards will be instructed not to oppose the postponement of men who are employed in the production of dairy and live stock products. Farm leaves, including special spring and harvest leaves, will continue to be granted. They will naturally be limited by the fact that many men formerly available have been sent overseas. However, men who have returned from overseas on rotation leaves will be eligible this year to help on the farm.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
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RADIO BROADCASTING

INQUIRY AS TO PERMITS FOR STATIONS IN WESTERN CANADA


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. DIEFENBAKER (Lake Centre):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Munitions and Supply, under whose jurisdiction apparently licences are granted to firms operating radio stations, during the period of the war. A day or so ago the Free Press carried a news item to the effect that a radio station would be opened immediately at St. Boniface, Manitoba, and that stations were planned for Gravelbourg and Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, and Edmonton, Alberta. In view of the fact that there is already a ninety-eight per cent coverage by CBK and the private stations, is it a fact that the minister has granted permits for the opening of these additional stations, as set out in the article to which I have referred? If not, is he now giving consideration to the question whether or not they will be opened?

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PERMITS FOR STATIONS IN WESTERN CANADA
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Mr. Speaker, my duties are

simply the administration of the radio act, which is the technical allocation of air waves. Recommendations in the matter of new broadcasting stations come from the C.B.C., through the Minister of National War Services. My recollection of the facts is that a licence has

Supply-Mines and Resources

been issued for a station at St. Boniface, and that at the same time applications were made for licences for the three other stations referred1 to by my hon. friend. The permit for the station at S't. Boniface was issued, with the distinct understanding that it was without prejudice to the applications for licences at the other points. That was on, the recommendation of the C.B.C. When further recommendations come forward from C.B.C., they will be considered by the government.

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PERMITS FOR STATIONS IN WESTERN CANADA
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

If I may ask a

supplementary question, has the C.B.C. recommended to the minister, who as he says is in charge of the allocation of wave lengths, the issuance of licences for Prince Albert, Gravel-bourg and1 Edmonton?

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PERMITS FOR STATIONS IN WESTERN CANADA
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Reconstruction; Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The answer is no.

Topic:   RADIO BROADCASTING
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PERMITS FOR STATIONS IN WESTERN CANADA
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FARM PUMPS

INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO INCREASED QUOTA


On the orders of the day:


NAT

James Arthur Ross

National Government

Mr. J. A. ROSS (Souris):

Mr. Speaker, I

should like to direct a question to the Minister of Finance, based on a letter from the Brandon Pump and Windmill Works stating that they have ninety orders for farm pumps, some dating back to last October, and that they are definitely needed. They have asked for an increased quota, as they have on hand materials to continue the supply. The application was refused, with instructions that they could make up stock and hold pumps until after July 1. This equipment is urgently needed now by farmers, in Manitoba at least, in order that they may continue to do their part in the food production programme. Will the minister have the order altered so that these pumps can be obtained?

Topic:   FARM PUMPS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO INCREASED QUOTA
Permalink

March 29, 1945