March 27, 1945

REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES


On the orders of the day:


PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. M. C. SENN (Haldimand):

Mr. Speaker, before the orders of the day are called I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Agriculture, based on a report in the morning papers respecting proceedings in a senate subcommittee conducting an investigation into food shortages in the United States. It is reported that the

director of supply for the United States Commodity Credit Corporation told the committee that efforts had been made to get large quantities of meat from Canada, but that the Canadian government would not permit exports. In view of the statement made on December 5, 1944, by the Minister of Agriculture in reply to a question asked by the house leader of the Progressive Conservative party (Mr. Graydon) that Washington had suggested that Canada should not send beef cattle to the United States and that the government of Canada was respecting that attitude, will the minister make a state-

ment explaining what appears to be a contradiction of his previous comments in this connection?

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture):

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry I did not notice the question of the hon. member until he had begun reading it and I saw the copy of it on my desk; therefore I have not had time to consider the matter. I should like to say, however, that I noticed in the newspapers this morning the statement reported to have been made by the director of supply for the United States Commodity Credit Corporation, and I find it most difficult to believe that such a statement was made without any statement being made at the same time as to what it may be related to. There may have been some request from the United States Commodity Credit Corporation for beef from Canada at some period or another during the war. However, the reference I made on December 5, 1944, was based upon an inquiry made personally by our own deputy minister in Washington a short time prior to the making of it. Any statement made in the house was in exact accordance with information we had from Washington.

Another question, to which reference was made in the house at the same time, had to do with two different matters, and I believe was referred to by one of the senators in replying to this particular statement. I believe I made the statement to the house in December last-and if I did not, I make it to-day-that at that time, when the peak in delivery was reached last fall, not only did we approach Washington, but we also took the matter up with certain packing plants in St. Paul, Minnesota. We asked them whether or not they would take delivery of a stated number of cattle per week over a short period of time, in order to relieve the Winnipeg stock market.

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

Would that number amount to the quota?

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

No; we simply asked them if they would agree that so many hundred or so many thousand cattle should bt taken off the Winnipeg market during a certain period, and sent down to St. Paul, to be processed in St. Paul plants, instead of at home. The plants were overcrowded in Winnipeg. We received in reply from the cooperative in St. Paul, a telegram, which I could place on the table of the house saying that it would be impossible for them to handle these cattle, and1 advising us to keep them on this side of the line.

Awards for Gallantry

Not only did we consult with officials of the department in Washington but we took the matter up with packing plants as well, and had the same kind of information from both. Of course it is understood by all, I think, in the United States and Canada as well as in Great Britain, that it has been the united wish of all three that as much as possible of surplus meat, not only from Canada but from this continent, should be sent to Great Britain or to other countries requiring it, particularly in these days when other countries are being occupied by the allied forces. We have been cooperating to the greatest extent possible in making the largest amounts available from this country for shipment directly to Britain. That has been understood by the representatives of all three governments. The matter is still under consideration and discussion, even more so now than it was last fall.

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

Is the situation the same to-day as it was in December when the minister made his statement to the house?

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

The situation is somewhat different to-day. I am sure the hon. member for Haldimand realizes, as we all do who are interested in the marketing of live stock, that the rush period of deliveries comes in the fall of the year so far as western Canada is concerned, and there is probably also a rush delivery in the spring of the year in the eastern part of Canada where cattle are grain fed. But the period of which I was speaking was the rush period of last fall, when it was natural that we should be considering the plants at St. Paul rather than in the eastern part of the United States. I presume that a similar situation might develop in the spring of this year, although it has not up to the present moment. Last fall we were not able to get all the hogs and cattle we had coming to market through our plants at the time they should go through. At the present time our plants are not running to capacity with live stock coming in, and for that reason I would say there would be less likelihood than there was last fall of anyone asking that we should ship our live stock to the United States for processing of meats on their way to Britain. We can probably put all that will come for-word in a short period of time through our own plants, and for that reason more meat can be got to Britain by keeping our own plants fully occupied than could be if we shipped more to the United States and kept our own plants only partly busy.

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
PC

Mark Cecil Senn

Progressive Conservative

Mr. SENN:

I hesitate, Mr. Speaker, to ask another question, but evidently the director of

supply over there told the committee that efforts have been made to get larger quantities. Is that correct?

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. GARDINER:

I have checked all the records that have come from the other side and all the records we have here, and now that the question has been raised, I think 1 should say all the records show that there has been more meat consumed in the United States per head of population than there has in Canada. I think that fact should be made known not only in this country but in the United States. There has been so much discussion of this question by people who have not the facts before them that I am afraid some people may have got a wrong impression. The people of the United States appear to have the idea that we consume a much greater quantity of meat in this country in relation to our population than they do. That is not the fact. Their own statistics coming here indicate that while the figures for the two countries are approximately the same, the consumption per head of population has been slightly higher on the other side of the line than in Canada.

The fact remains that on the other side of the line they have a greater difficulty in equalizing the distribution than we have on this side. We have only five or six large cities, while they have a very considerable number of large cities, some of them much larger than ours. On this side of the line we have followed the practice, when there has been a threatened shortage in Toronto, let us say, of shipping meat in and paying the freight on it from some other part of Canada, to make meat available in the shortage area. To apply that same idea to the United States would perhaps be a little more difficult. Nevertheless that practice has resulted in a more equitable distribution of meat in this country, with a lesser per capita consumption that there is in the United States.

Topic:   REQUEST FOR CLARIFICATION IN RESPECT OF SHIPMENTS FROM CANADA TO THE UNITED STATES
Permalink

CANADIAN ARMED FORCES

DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, may I direct a suggestion rather than a question to the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of National Defence, also to the Minister of National Defence for Naval Services and to the Minister of National Defence for Air? At the last session of parliament, approximately a year ago, not during the fall sittings, the three ministers at my suggestion placed upon

Privilege-Mr. Wood

Hansard lists of Canadian service personnel who have been awarded decorations for gallantry. I think it would be appropriate if before the session closes the lists were brought up to date by the three ministers. It would be an admirable idea to have these further names on Hansard.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
Subtopic:   DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY
Permalink
LIB

Colin William George Gibson (Minister of National Defence for Air)

Liberal

Hon. C. W. G. GIBSON (Minister of National Defence for Air):

Mr. Speaker, the list for the Department of National Defence for Air has been prepared and is ready to be placed on Hansard.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
Subtopic:   DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY
Permalink
NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Thank you.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
Subtopic:   DECORATIONS FOR GALLANTRY
Permalink

INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO FARM LEAVE


On the orders of the day:


SC

Charles Edward Johnston

Social Credit

Mr. C. E. JOHNSTON (Bow River):

I would like to direct a question to the appropriate minister, either the acting Minister of National Defence or the Minister of' Labour. As spring is now here and agricultural work is getting under way, especially in the west, what provision, if any, has been made for the release of men from the armed forces, either general service or home defence, to work on the farms?

Topic:   INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO FARM LEAVE
Permalink
LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

This of course is a hardy annual. My hon. friend can rest assured that we will get the crop in and get it off, as we have done every year in cooperation with the provincial authorities.

Topic:   INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO FARM LEAVE
Permalink

March 27, 1945