March 19, 1945

NEW MEMBER

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that during the recess the clerk of the house has received from the chief electoral officer a certificate of the election and return of the following member, viz:

Of Wilfred Garfield Case, Esquire, for the electoral district of Grey North.

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NEW MEMBER INTRODUCED


Wilfred Garfield Case, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Grey North, introduced by Mr. Gordon Graydon and Hon. R. B. Hanson.


OATHS OF OFFICE


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved for leave to introduce bill No. 1. respecting the administration of oaths of office. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Governor General this day in the Senate chamber, His Excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses of parliament. To prevent mistakes, I have obtained a copy, which is as follows:

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

You have been called into session for the dispatch of business which it is in the national interest to conclude before the expiration of the present parliament.

Since I last addressed you, the war in Europe and in Asia has continued with relentless fury. In Europe, the Allied forces are rapidly advancing to what there is every reason to believe will be decisive victory. Canada is prouder than ever of the splendid achievements of her fighting forces, at sea, on land, and in the air.

The government has accepted the invitation to Canada to send representatives to a conference of the united nations to be held on April 25, at San Francisco, to prepare a charter for a general international organization for the maintenance of international peace and security. My ministers are of the opinion that the Canadian delegation at the San Francisco conference should be assured of the widest possible measure of support from parliament. A joint resolution of both houses will accordingly be submitted for your approval.

Members of the House of Commons:

The term of the present parliament will have expired on April 17. A general election will be held shortly thereafter. You will be asked to make the necessary financial provisions for the effective conduct of the war, and to meet the ordinary expenses of government, for the period between the end of the present fiscal year and the opening of a new parliament.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

May Divine Providence guide your deliberations in this solemn moment in the history of the world.

The late John Monat Turner

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THE LATE JOHN MOUAT TURNER

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, before we enter upon the business of this session I should like to make a reference to the passing of one who to-day is very much missed in this House of Commons. I refer to our friend the late hon. member for Springfield, John Mouat Turner. As hon. members will recall, Mr. Turner was in this house for some ten years, having been first elected in the general election of 1935 and again in 1940. He had just been renominated in the constituency of Springfield as Liberal candidate to contest the riding at the next general election.

The constituency of Springfield because of its great extent, the variety of its industries and the mixed character of its population, is not an easy constituency either to contest or hold. Agriculture is the principal industry, but there is also much in the way of manufacturing and various business concerns. In the constituency there is also a large number of railway workers. The constituency might be regarded as a cross-section of the province of Manitoba. Mr. Turner followed different occupations in his early years. He was one who always kept closely in touch with his fellow men, enjoyed the sharing of their interests, and sought so far as opportunity afforded to do what he could to further their well-being. The fact that he was able to cany the constituency as he did on two occasions, and to merit the recognition accorded him of being asked again to contest it, proves that he possessed in rare measure personal characteristics of the kind that gained for him not only many friends in his constituency but also friends on all sides in this House of Commons. It might be added that in his election contests he had been opposed by formidable opponents.

Mr. Turner did not take much part in the debates of the house. He was however faithful in his attendance and when he spoke never failed to make clear the breadth of his human sympathies. He was always ready to do what he could to further measures for the well-being of his fellow men, showing particular interest in improving the lot of the less privileged members of society.

I shall always personally be deeply grateful to the late member for his personal loyalty, and for his loyalty to the principles and policies of his party. While some of the government's policies may not wholly have met his views, nevertheless he stood firm in his sup-

port in the belief that the larger and general interest was more important than that of any one particular interest.

Mr. Turner's father, who was of Irish descent, was one of the pioneers of Manitoba. His mother was Scottish. When one recalls the personal characteristics of the late member one realizes that he possessed in full measure the quality of humour and cheerfulness so characteristic of most of the Irish race, and also that of loyalty, which is the very essence of the best Scottish character. This house and particularly the party of which throughout his life he. was so staunch a member, is the poorer today for his passing, all the poorer in that he had not yet completed his forty-fifth year.

I am sure, Mr. Speaker, it will be the wish of all hon. members that you convey to Mrs. Turner, and also to the late Mr. Turner's mother and to his brothers an expression in the loss its membership has sustained in his passing and an expression of sincere sympathy to them in their bereavement.

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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to make only one addition to what has been said by the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), and that is that in the passing of John M. Turner, the late member for Springfield, the house loses a member who upon his return to the house in 1936 was numbered among the seven or eight younger members. While I have not checked the record, certainly this is the first time since I came to the house in 1936 that we have lost a member who was born in this century. I mention this only to indicate the uncertainty of life and to emphasize the sorrow felt by members of this party and members generally at the passing of one so young.

The Prime Minister has referred to Mr. Turner's friendliness. I should like to emphasize what he has said in that regard. After all, in political life, and particularly in parliament, there are certain fundamentals which go much deeper than may appear on the superficial political surface. John Turner passed from this earthly life with perhaps as many personal friends as any other member of parliament. I think no better tribute can be paid a man than that upon leaving his fellow men in parliament or elsewhere, he leaves with the friendship of all and the enemy of none. It is with deep sorrow that we mourn his passing. John Turner was not a man who took a very prominent part in the debates of the house, but when he did speak, to use street parlance, he spoke straight from the shoulder, and did not hide his words under piles of oratorical straw. Not only does

The late John Mouat Turner

he leave behind friends from his own political group, but also friends from this group. Although I did not support his party, and was opposed to him in most political divisions, I considered him a close personal friend. I shall miss him because in the halls and corridors of the house, and in the chamber, I learned to regard him with deep affection, and as one who through the years I was honoured to call a friend.

The sympathy of this party goes out to his wife and the other members of his family. We extend our sympathy to the Prime Minister, to the government and the party to which he belonged in the loss they have sustained. I should like to join in what has been expressed so eloquently by the Prime Minister, and in thus paying tribute to the memory of a fellow member I shall have discharged a duty which would have given me pleasure were he here, but which is a sad one because of this occasion.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, we wish to associate ourselves with the expressions of sympathy to the widow, the mother and brothers of the late Mr. Turner, and we would also express sympathy to the Prime Minister in the loss of a faithful follower.

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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, it seems particularly regrettable that a young man who apparently had such promise should have been called away at such an early age. We deeply sympathize with those who are bereaved, and also with the Prime Minister and the members of his party in the loss of this man.

I had some connection with Mr. Turner, and was led to believe that he represented his constituency sincerely, and worked for what he deemed to be the welfare of Canada as a whole. I am sorry I did not learn to know more about him, but so far as I did learn, I considered him worthy of respect.

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LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. DANIEL McIVOR (Fort William):

Mr. Speaker, from this corner of the house I should like to pay my humble tribute to an old friend, Johnny Turner. As a baseball player he could throw straight and strike hard -characteristics which he carried with him into his life. He called almost daily in my room, and while he and I did not agree on certain things, there was one thing on which we did agree. I can still see the twinkle in his eye when he told me that his father and mother were Christian Presbyterians. When he told me that his health was not good, I could then say to him, as one man to another, "Just one thing counts. It is not your position 32283-1J

in life or the amount of money you can pile up: it is your faith in God that counts." Johnny Turner told me that a man is a big fool if he does not make sure that his faith is fixed in God. That is my tribute to the hon. member who sat in this royal comer of the house.

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LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Minister of Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, as a colleague from Manitoba of the late Mr. Turner who sat in the house for over nine years with him, I wish to pay a tribute of respect to his memory and to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon), the leaders of the other parties and the hon. member for Fort William (Mr. Mclvor) in extending to his family our very deep sympathy.

The constituency that Mr. Turner represented was a difficult one to represent. I doubt if any riding in the whole dominion was more cosmopolitan in character than the riding of Springfield. But in that constituency Mr. Turner had friends among all classes and all racial origins whatever they were. It is a tribute to the character of the man that in his work as representative of the constituency he drew these people together and made them feel that they were Canadians, made them feel that they had their place in the life of this country.

He made no pretence of having all the human virtues. He had his failings like the rest of us poor human mortals. But Mr. Turner was a man of sincere convictions. He was a man of no pretence of any kind. He believed in right as he saw it and he was prepared to fight for it. The great mass of people are just ordinary folk and to lose Mr. Turner is a loss, not only to this parliament but to the great body of people in the country and especially those in the constituency he represented here for so many years.

Mr. JEAN-FRANCOIS POULIOT (Temis-couata): Mr. Speaker, it was my great privilege to consider the late Mr. Turner, the

former member for Springfield, a personal friend. His loss will be felt by all of us, and especially by his constituents who were his friends. There were large numbers of Frenchspeaking Canadians in his constituency and they liked Jack Turner very much. They thought highly of him. While he was in the house he was true to them, and he expressed their views with remarkable courage.

Jack Turner was four-square; he was strongly built, and he was not afraid to say what he thought. In his first year here he made practical and useful and progressive suggestions, some of which have been accepted. In later-

Business of the House-Precedence

years he protested vigorously against certain policies and he met with success. He spoke frankly to the government and urged them to take into consideration what he said, and Jack Turner won his case.

The subject matter of his protests seemed of no importance to some of the members of parliament, but it was of great interest to the army. Jack Turner deserves the tribute of being considered an outspoken member of parliament who did a good and useful job while he was sitting here as the representative of the constituency of Springfield in Manitoba.

May I express to Mrs. Turner, who often came to Ottawa with Mr. Turner, my deepest sympathy in her great loss.

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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION AND GOVERNMENT ORDERS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

After Your Honour has

reported the speech of His Excellency the Governor General to the houses of parliament it has been customary for whoever was leading the house to make a motion to the effect that the speech delivered by His Excellency should be taken into consideration at a subsequent sitting of the house, mentioning the time.

The intention of the government, in order to enable business to be proceeded with as .rapidly as possibly, is to have the debate on the address in reply proceeded with this afternoon, but only to a limited extent. The address will be moved and seconded by two hon. members of the house and the debate will then be adjourned to a subsequent time. Except in that particular there will be no difference in the order of procedure from what has been customary. I might say that what I have just indicated is not a departure, because on several occasions this house as well as the parliament at Westminster has taken time for the consideration of the address immediately following its delivery. What is being done to-day is simply for the purpose of expediting the work of this session. I would move:

That on Tuesday, the 20th March, 1945, to the end of the present session, government notices of motion and government orders shall have precedence at every sitting over all other business except questions by members and notices of motions for the production of papers.

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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, before this motion carries I should like to comment for a moment upon the suggestion of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) with respect to the address in reply to the speech from the throne. I take it that the Prime Minister has in mind

intervening with some other type of public business and postponing the debate on the address to some subsequent period.

I think I should not let this matter go by without registering objection with respect to the debate on the address being dealt with in this way. So far as the debate on the address is concerned it has been the established parliamentary practice that before supply is granted a motion of confidence in the government is placed before the house so that the house may decide upon it. I do not desire to debate the matter at any length beyond raising this objection on behalf of the opposition, and asking the Prime Minister if this procedure which he is now bringing forward has been adopted in previous parliaments. Since I came into the house some nine years ago I cannot recall any time when the government asked that the debate on the address should be postponed to some subsequent time. I should like to ask the Prime Minister what is the underlying reason for the government's proposal.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May I say in reply to my hon. friend that this resolution is being moved to give precedence to the business of the house rather than to a discussion on the address. As my hon. friend well knows, the debate on the address might run on conceivably for weeks. This session cannot continue beyond the sixteenth of next month because the term of parliament expires at that time. I believe it will be the wish of all, certainly of the people of the country, that the house should devote its time to the most important business that will be before it. There are, as my hon. friend is aware, two particular items mentioned in the speech from the throne that are most important; one the resolution with respect to the conference at San Francisco, and the other the financial measures that will have to be considered. It is important that no time should be lost in taking up both these measures.

As to my hon. friend's remark as to precedence, I may say that I anticipated he might raise that question and I asked the Clerk to give me a memorandum. I have the following record of what has taken place-part of it, I might say, during the time my hon. friend has been in the house but which he has possibly forgotten:

After the general elections of 1930, the house met in special session on the 9th of September, 1930. The address in reply to the speech from the throne was moved by Mr. Turnbull and seconded by Mr. Gagnon immediately after the house returned from the senate. No motion

Business of the House-Precedence

was made giving precedence to the debate on the address. The debate continued on the next day when the address was passed.

There was no motion formally to continue the debate.

The motion giving precedence to the debate on the address was passed on the 12th of March, 1931, but on April 1, before the debate on the address was concluded, the house voted interim supply for the past fiscal year and went to the senate for royal assent. An amendment to the address was moved by Mr. Gardiner on April 20. It was negatived on the next day when the address was carried.

That was from March 12 to April 20.

In the session of 1932, Mr. Bennett moved, as shown by the journals under date of the 4th of February, that the speech be taken into consideration on the following Monday. On that Monday, before the debate on the address was resumed, Mr. Guthrie, Minister of Justice, moved that a select committee be apopinted to inquire into certain charges made by the Hon. G. N. Gordon against Mr. Bennett. A debate took place and the motion was agred to on that day. Debate on the address was then resumed and concluded on the next day, February 9, when the address was passed.

In the session of 1932-33. Mr. Bennett moved, on October 6, that the address be taken into consideration on the following Monday. Similar motions were made in the sessions of 1934, January 25, and of 1935, January 17.

It will be seen by these precedents that it is not necessary to move that the address be given precedence, but a day may be fixed for it to be considered later in the session. There is no standing order regulating the procedure to be followed with respect to the days on which the address is to be debated.

I might also quote Anson's Law and Custom of the Constitution, part I, Parliament, which at page 74 says:

The speech from the throne setting forth the causes of summons may be necessary to put in motion the business of both houses, but the addresses in answer are non-essential forms: for parliament is not limited in legislation or discussion by the topics set forth from the throne.

I believe that is sufficient to show that there is no departure being made at the present time but that we are simply giving precedence to the business for which this particular parliament has been called.

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March 19, 1945