July 24, 1944

LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. REID:

For a copy of all correspondence passing between Norboru Yamamoto and the Minister of Labour or any of his officials in connection with selective service regulations.

Topic:   JAPANESE NATIONALS-NORBORU YAMAMOTO
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ONTARIO HOURS OP WORK AND VACATIONS WITH PAY ACT

CCF

Joseph William Noseworthy

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NOSEWORTHY:

Topic:   ONTARIO HOURS OP WORK AND VACATIONS WITH PAY ACT
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

SATURDAY SITTINGS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That on Saturday, the 29th July, 1944, and every Saturday thereafter until the end of the present session, the house shall meet at 11 o'clock a.m., and the order of business and procedure shall be the same as on Fridays.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

May I ask the Prime Minister how many Saturdays he has in mind?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I hope there will not be more than one.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CLARENCE GILLIS (Cape Breton South):

Mr. Speaker, the members of this group are not satisfied to let the motion pass without some explanation from the Prime Minister as to how many Saturdays it is anticipated we may be here. If this motion means that we are to sit Saturdays only for the purpose of handling routine business, that we are to sit one or two Saturdays in order to get the business of the house over with, we would be quite satisfied to agree to it. However, there is a lot of important new legislation coming in at the tail end of the session. The house is now sitting morning, noon and night throughout the week, and in order to familiarize ourselves with the new legislation, in order to try to understand what is going through the house, we require at least our Saturdays to catch up with our work. Those of ns who have to remain here all the time while the house is sitting find it rather hard. The business that still has to go through the house is of extreme importance, particularly the new legislation which must be scrutinized carefully if we are to understand what it is all about and protect the Canadian people in the process of its going through.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

You are not the only one who is protecting them.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

You speak for yourself. I am asking the Prime Minister if it is possible for him to indicate what the length of the session will be. Otherwise we are not in favour of this motion to sit on Saturdays, morning, noon and night, in addition to working the rest of the week on the same basis. We figure that we cannot handle the work of the house as it should be handled.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I should like to be able to give my hon. friend a precise answer, but when he asks me how much time will be occupied by hon. gentlemen opposite, I have to say to him that I cannot possibly

Saturday Sittings

tell. The length of the session, onee the sessional programme is announced, depends more on the opposition than it does on the government. Unfortunately I cannot say how much time hon. gentlemen may wish to take in discussing the measures that are before the house. What I would point out to the hon. member is that there will be no legislation coming down that I am aware of at the moment to which reference was not made in the speech from the throne and the introduction of which hon. members have had knowledge of since the beginning of the session, or one or two measures since announced, the purport of which they are already aware. It is quite true that some of the bills have not been before the house, but I think hon. members have a pretty good idea of what will be contained in the bills. I point that out to make clear that the government is not trying to do anything exceptional at the present time.

There are still estimates to pass. These have been before members of parliament since the beginning of the session. There will be nothing new under that heading except the supplementary estimates that may be brought down.

It has always been necessary in the winding up of the business of a session to have morning and Saturday sittings, and I have tried as far as I could to judge what the wish of the house might be and have the wish of hon. members carried out. I think it was July 24, just a year ago to-day, that the previous session of parliament concluded. It looks as though this session, which opened almost the same time in January of this year, is going to run on some little time longer. But I do believe hon. members hope- we may wind up the business without very much in the way of delay.

My hon. friend says, "we are here all the time," but I have not seen either his leader or the leader of the Social Credit group in this house for a week or more past. After all, leaders do count for something, or ought to count for something whenever reference is made to a party as a whole. I would say to my hon. friend that the disposition of the government will be to try to arrange Saturday business in a way that will be generally acceptable. We will not seek to bring on contentious measures on Saturdays, but I think we could get th'-ough a good deal of business in the way of estimates.

I hope there will not be any exception taken to this motion because I really believe it d^0' meet with the general wish of those who desire to wind up the business of this session as soon as possible.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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PC

Agar Rodney Adamson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. ADAMSON:

This shows clearly the folly of the Prime Minister's motion which washed out all sittings on Wednesdays during the body of the session, thus losing much irreplaceable time.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

I would like to make a brief observation with_respect to what has passed between the Prime Minister and the hon. member for Cape Breton South. There is something in what the hon. member for Cape Breton South says with respect to the burden which those of us in opposition have to carry as well as the members of the government. This burden falls particularly upon those of us who have to be in our seats practically all the time in order to watch the legislation. It does not give us very much time to study the legislation.

Perhaps the Prime Minister would be good enough to consider this question a week from Friday. If at that time the house is not within a reasonable distance of concluding its work, perhaps we may have that Saturday off, having in mind the circumstances as they then are. I would have no objection to the motion going through on the understanding that the Prime Minister keep in mind the possibility of thus reviewing the position.

When the Prime Minister says that the length of the session is governed solely by the opposition-

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Not solely.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

I took it from his remark that he had the opposition largely in mind so far as the extending of the length of the session was concerned. I must say to the Prime Minister that the opposition needs a certain amount of time to give proper attention to the measures that come before the house. Having that definitely in mind may I point out to the Prime Minister that this is an unusual session from the government's point of view. I do not think since I came into the house there has been a session in which there were so many bills to be dealt with in the last few moments which had not been seen at all by the members of the house. The government will have to take some responsibility in that regard, because the opposition cannot be expected at the last minute to go through all the estimates and study important bills that have not yet come before the house and conclude the session within a few days. We have to consider that our job first of all is to criticize properly these bills as they come before us, no matter how long we may have to stay here to do it; but that does not mean of course that we should waste time in useless debate and repetition.

Farm Prices

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I take no exception to my hon. friend doing everything possible to protect the full rights of the opposition, and I agree that criticism is helpful. But I do take exception to the attitude that the government is always trying to put something over. The measures which the government is bringing down are obviously in the interests of the people, and I would hope that the opposition would join with the government in seeking to place these measures on the statutes as soon as possible.

As to a week from Friday, may I say to my hon. friend that in reviewing the situation I have been asking myself very seriously whether, if this session is going to ran on very much longer, it would not be better to adjourn over August and September and meet again in October and November. I do not want to do that, because I do not think hon. members wish to do it, but that is an aspect of the situation which will have to be considered in any review that may be made. May I say to my hon. friend, with regard to what may be done a week from Saturday, that sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   SATURDAY SITTINGS
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Motion agreed to.


FARM PRICES ' PROVISION FOR STABILIZATION, PURCHASE OF STAPLE PRODUCTS AT APPROVED PRICES, ETC.


Hon. J. G. GARDINER (Minister of Agriculture) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient for the purpose of supporting farm prices during the transition from war to peace to introduce a measure to establish a board with authority to purchase through agents or otherwise, staple agricultural products at prices recommended by the board and approved by the governor in council, or to make such payments in respect of staple agricultural products as may -be necessary to bring average returns to producers up to the prices so approved, and to give the board such powers as may be necessary for the handling and disposition of products purchased; and further to provide for the appointment of sudh officers, clerks and employees as may be necessary; To _ provide further that the governor in council may authorize from time to time payments^ out of unappropriated moneys in the consolidated revenue fund, up to an aggregate of two hundred million dollars, for expenditures under the said measure, exclusive of administrative expenditures; that there shall be a special account to which all expenditures under the said measure, other than administrative expenditures, are charged, and to which all receipts from the sale or disposition of agricultural products shall be credited, which receipts shall be available in the account for subsequent expenditures provided that the net realized refits in the account in any fiscal year shall e credited to the consolidated revenue fund [Mr. Gmydon.J and any net realized loss in the account in any fiscal year shall be recouped to the said account from an appropriation by parliament for the purpose. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


July 24, 1944