July 3, 1944

NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Why pick out Bennett? What about the government in power from 1935 to 1939; what did they do about it?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

As I explained on a previous occasion, the new administration from 1935 to 1939 were more generous.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

You traded a horse for a rabbit.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

The houses built during the Bennett regime in northern Saskatchewan were on a 850 unit basis. Engineers and architects were engaged to draw up blueprints to explain how a $50 house could be constructed,

where the windows should be; and you were required from this $50 to pay for the lumber, the nails, the windows, the roofing and the floors-everything for $50. But the new administration in 1935 increased the amount from $50 to $75.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

They supplied the nails.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

You can build a much better house for $75 than for $50, but it is still a $75 house. The nation which this year is going to spend very large sums of money did not seem able to visualize a more ambitious programme for carpenters and other men in the building trade, who had committed no crime, who were the victims of unemployment. It was the men in the building trade who were hit the hardest. I have in mind three exservicemen of the last war who were carpenters in Regina, who came north to my constituency, and were assisted by the administration of the day-$100 each from the federal government, the provincial government and the city administration-to build fifty-dollar houses. These three men are fighting to-day for the second time in their lifetime and their sons are serving with them. Some people argued a few years ago that these men were lazy and good for nothing, but they demonstrated before and are demonstrating again that they are made of the very best stuff.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Who said they were lazy?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

We heard it in the house.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

The only member who ever said that the unemployed were lazy was the hon. member for Wellington North.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Apparently it was the policy of both administrations to keep the people ground down, living in these log shacks, without floors or adequate windows, for they had no other way of getting the wherewithal to build a house. Although they could get lumber at $5 a thousand cut from trees on their own farms, they could not get from the administration $5 a thousand to cut lumber to put partitions in their houses.

Therefore, it is encouraging to find that some recognition has been made of the deplorable conditions on the farms in Canada. In this connection I note some comments regarding the case for farm electrification:

The report of the Manitoba electrification inquiry commission has made the most substantial contribution to understanding of the subject and to the material needed for formulation of policy, in recent times. Its considered judgment is that electricity on the farm has profound and far-reaching effects upon the social as well as upon the economic aspects of farming. It reduces drudgery upon the farm as it has done

The Budget-Mr. Nicholson

in the factory; it increases income; reduces costs of production and, 'by removing the disparity between the rural and urban way of life, brings a large measure of contentment to people on the farm.

I hope that this administration will be able to carry its pious hopes into practice. I wish that hon. members to my right would support the C.C.F. in our drive to have S2J,- thousand million spent each year for two years after the war is over, with a view to having rural electrification carried out.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

After the next election you will be supporting us.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

What optimism!

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

It is going to be difficult to convince men in the training centres-on Vancouver island, in Newfoundland, on the prairies, at Dafoe-where they have running water and electricity, electric slaves to do much of their hard work, that although we could build power lines, although we could electrify the country during these years, when there was a shortage of man-power, it will be necessary because of the want of money, for them to tighten their belts when they come back and return to the conditions that prevailed in the days of the coal oil lamp. While I was in Saskatchewan recently I visited Island Falls in my riding where we have a large power development. Electricity is so cheap there that the houses are electrically heated and lighted and the citizens have every modern convenience that electric power can furnish. When you think how electricity has transformed that northern country, what it has meant in the development of the Flin Flon, you naturally long for the time when all the people on our farms will have the right to the use of electric washing machines and electrical appliances of all sorts in their homes. The two and a half billions suggested by the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar (Mr. Cold-well) would make available an appropriation so that power lines could be put at the disposal of the people in all parts of rural Canada. But if we are to wait for the farmers to launch the programme they will be in the position where they will not know whether farm prices will fall to very low levels again. It is true we have 'been promised a floor under farm prices, but we are still waiting for details, and unless the administration is more generous in its treatment of farmers in the post-war period than in the years before the war, the farmers will look forward to falling prices of agricultural products and increasing prices of the products they buy.

One other chapter in this book should be mentioned before I get through, namely, the

section dealing with cooperative housing. The hon. member for Cape Breton South (Mr. Gillis) would be much better qualified to discuss this question than I, but members from Nova Scotia, I think, deserve a good deal of credit for the start made in that province in the field of cooperative housing. In 1932 legislation was passed that made available seventy-five per cent of the total cost involved in starting a cooperative housing project, and the staff at St. Francis Xavier college at Anti-gonish deserved most of the credit for selling to the farmers the importance of banding themselves together and working out a solution of the housing shortage. I find here that the costs of these projects are unbelievably low. One project involves monthly amortization payments of only $9.65, which includes interest, insurance and taxes.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

I do not want to interrupt, but would the hon. member give some idea-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. gentleman's

time has expired.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Let him go ahead. I

think he should clear up one question. What is the value of the house, and what does it contain?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

These houses have

been built-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

If the house gives its

unanimous consent, the hon. member may continue.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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NAT

Karl Kenneth Homuth

National Government

Mr. HOMUTH:

Can the hon. member

give us an idea of the value of the house and what it contains?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CCF

Alexander Malcolm Nicholson

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

These are eight-roomed family houses. I have visited them and they are very comfortable. They are built by the miners and would sell at from $3,000 to $4,000. They were built cooperatively in groups of twelve. The provincial government made the money available at 3i per cent over a twenty-year period, and as a result these miners have living quarters such as would rent at from forty and fifty dollars a month in Ottawa, for less than ten dollars a month.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink

July 3, 1944