June 5, 1944

CITY OF OTTAWA

JOINT COMMITTEE OF BOTH HOUSES-CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT

LIB

James Ewen Matthews

Liberal

Mr. J. E. MATTHEWS (Brandon-for Mr Gregory) moved:

That the first report of the joint committee of both houses to review the special problems arising out of the location of the seat of government in the city of Ottawa, presented on June 1, be now concurred in.

Topic:   CITY OF OTTAWA
Subtopic:   JOINT COMMITTEE OF BOTH HOUSES-CONCURRENCE IN FIRST REPORT
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Motion agreed to.


ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

RATIONING OF BEER AND SPIRITS-ONTARIO AND QUEBEC-STATEMENT OF PREMIER DREW

LIB

Colin William George Gibson (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Hon. C. W. G. GIBSON (Minister of National Revenue):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to make a statement with reference to an announcement recently made by the premier of Ontario concerning the ration of spirits in

Alcoholic Beverages-Rationing

that province. Colonel Drew referred to the difference in the amounts authorized by the provinces of Quebec and Ontario, and stated:

There may be some good explanation for this striking contrast in ration, but there can be no doubt of the effect of this situation upon the minds of those who come in contact with it.

Under P.C. 11374, the wartime alcoholic beverages order, the provinces are restricted to receiving each year for sale seventy per cent of the spirits which they received during the year ended October 31, 1942.

Each province receives the same percentage. All are treated alike, and there is therefore no foundation for any suggestion of discrimination.

Although this fact is well known, efforts are constantly being made to create an impression that Quebec is receiving preferential treatment over other provinces, particularly Ontario. The following table gives a comparison of spirit and beer consumption in these two provinces during the year ended October 31, 1943, the first complete year under the restriction order: *

Spirits

,

A_________________

Domestic Imported Total (proof (proof (proof

gallons) gallons) gallons) Ontario... 942.640-33 207.178-81 1,149,819-14

Quebec.... 959,948-69 203,698-51 1,163,647-20

Beer

Delivered under 90 per cent quota (gallons)

Ont?rio 36,993,411

Quebec 27,947,571

It will be noted that although Quebec received 13,828 proof gallons of spirits more than Ontario, Ontario consumed over nine million gallons of beer more than Quebec. Expressing it in another way, Quebec received 1-2 per cent more spirits, while Ontario received 32-4 per cent more beer.

One obvious reason for the discrepancy in the ration between, provinces lies in the variation in the number of permits issued. I observe from a recent advertisement of the liquor control board of Ontario that in January, 1943, when the permits issued by the province totalled 155,295 the monthly ration was 160 ounces. According to the same source, in March, 1944, the province had issued 1,282,938 permits, and the ration at that time was 26 ounces. I do not know how many permits are outstanding in Ontario at the present time. In one Ontario city a man has recently been prosecuted for having no less than 63 permits. The best answer to Premier Drew's allusions to the relative ration of Ontario and Quebec seems to be

made by the chairman of the Ontario liquor commission, who says in the advertisement, "It is a problem in simple arithmetic," and goes on to state that:

The increase in the number of permits and the extent to which permit holders are purchasing spirits each month makes it necessary to reduce the amount which can be purchased by permit holders in Ontario.

Attempts are also being made to becloud the issue by drawing attention to the stocks of spirits which are held in warehouses. As far as the federal government is concerned, there has never been any suggestion that the restriction placed on the consumption of spirits was attributable to a shortage of supply. The Prime Minister made it clear in his speech of December 16, 1942, that the restrictions were being imposed to ensure a total w'ar effort, and the reasons which he advanced at that time are not only valid to-day, but as the hour of our greatest trial approaches they possess added significances

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   RATIONING OF BEER AND SPIRITS-ONTARIO AND QUEBEC-STATEMENT OF PREMIER DREW
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Is the minister prepared to table the correspondence which appears to have passed between the premier of the province of Ontario and the federal government relating to this problem?

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   RATIONING OF BEER AND SPIRITS-ONTARIO AND QUEBEC-STATEMENT OF PREMIER DREW
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The correspondence was between the premier and myself. I shall be happy to see that it is tabled.

Topic:   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Subtopic:   RATIONING OF BEER AND SPIRITS-ONTARIO AND QUEBEC-STATEMENT OF PREMIER DREW
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QUEBEC SAYINGS BANKS ACT

DECENNIAL BEVISION


Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance) moved for leave to introduce bill No. 131, to amend the Quebec Savings Banks Act. He said: The Quebec Savings Banks Act is amended each ten years, just as the Bank Act is. I have not before me a list of the proposed amendments, but they will be apparent when the bill is reached. * Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 119, for the relief of William Taf-fert. Mr. Mcllraith. Bill No. 120, for the relief of Belle Bailey Leibovitch.-Mr. Mcllraith. [DOT] Bill No. 121, for the relief of Gertie Shul-man Friedman.-Mr. Mcllraith. Bill No. 122, for the relief of Sarah Slutsky Shapiro.-Mr. Mcllraith. Bill No. 123, for the relief of Jessie Dickson Mackie Toy.-Mr. Hill. Bill No. 124, for the relief of Angele Pauline Edgar Marie Lambert Choux.-Mr. Fulford. Questions Bill No. 125, for the relief of Margaret Kathleen Hollenback Fortin.-Mr. Fulford. Bill No. 126, for the relief of Hulda Van Koughnet Lynch-Staunton.-Mr. Boucher. Bill No. 127, for the relief of James MacMillan McHale.-Mr. Homuth. Bill No. 128, for the relief of Vernon Ross Aiken.-Mr. Boucher. Bill No. 129, for the relief of Frederick Richard Channon.-Mr. Factor. Bill No. 130, for the relief of Ernest Charles Hazard.-Mr. Whitman.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


BICYCLES

NAT

Mr. BLACK (Cumberland):

National Government

1. Has the government or the wartime prices and trade board fixed the sale price and number of bicycles sold in Canada?

2. What are the delivered sale prices and number of such bicycles sold each year an each of the following provinces: Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia?

3. Does the manufacturer, dealer, government or purchaser pay the freight?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BICYCLES
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LIB

Mr. ABBOTT: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

1. Yes. Under the provisions of wartime prices and trade board order A-694, the administrator of fabricated steel and nonferrous metal has jurisdiction over the production, manufacture, and design of bicycles sold in Canada. Prices have been fixed by the board on the basis of the consumer value of the wartime model.

2. The delivered sale prices and number of such bicycles sold in each of the years 1941 to 1943 inclusive are as follows:

Consumer prices Men's Ladies'Ontario and Quebec $42 50 $43 50New Brunswick] Nova Scotia 1. ... 45 00 46 00P.E.I. Number sold 1941 1942 1943Ontario 38,880 28,205 20,608Quebec 20,625 15,325 10,593New Brunswick .... 3,534 2,413 1,638Nova Scotia 3,611 2,728 2,005Prince Edward Is. .. 640 466 297Totals 6S,290 49,137 35,1413. The purchaser pays the freight chargesin the fixed prices established by order A-463.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BICYCLES
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June 5, 1944