May 18, 1944

THE PRIME MINISTER

ADDRESS DELIVERED ON MAY 11, TO BOTH HOUSES OP PARLIAMENT AT WESTMINSTER

LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Acting Prime Minister) :

In accordance with a statement I made on Thursday last, I now lay on the table three copies in English and French of the addresses on the occasion of the address of the Prime Minister of Canada to the members of both houses of parliament at Westminster on May 11. As I then indicated, I think it would be the wish of the house that these addresses be printed with the Votes and Proceedings of this house.

Topic:   THE PRIME MINISTER
Subtopic:   ADDRESS DELIVERED ON MAY 11, TO BOTH HOUSES OP PARLIAMENT AT WESTMINSTER
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FISHERIES

ARRANGEMENT WITH NEWFOUNDLAND TO PERMIT CANADIAN FISHERMEN TO LAND PORTION OP CATCH AND SALT

LIB

Ernest Bertrand (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST BERTRAND (Minister of Fisheries):

I wish to make a short statement regarding a privilege that has been granted to Canadian fishermen. Negotiations have been going on for some time between -the Department of External Affairs and the government of Newfoundland with reference to the desirability of permitting Canadian fishing vessels operating on the Grand Banks to land a portion of their catches and salt at Newfoundland ports, following which they would return to the banks for further fishing. They would then pick up their fish and salt before returning to Canada. As the fish gradually pack in the vessel, transferring a portion of the fish catches to shore enables a fuller load to be eventually brought home. The government of Newfoundland has seen fit to grant the request for this year only. The condition attached to their action was that announcement would be made by Newfoundland and

Foreign Exchange Control

Canada simultaneously. It was agreed that the announcement be made at three o'clock to-day.

As a result of negotiations with -the government of Newfoundland, it has complied, for this year only, with a request made to it by the Canadian government. The following conditions are to apply:

1. The privilege is limited to the calendar year 1944, and is restricted to Newfoundland customs ports of entry.

2. The master of each vessel is to report to the collector of customs furnishing that olficer with information as to the quantity of salt and fish to be landed together with the location of the premises to be used for storage.

3. The period of storage is not to exceed six weeks or such period as will allow the vessel to finish its baiting and then return to pick up the landed portion of its cargo for conveyance to a Canadian port.

4. The owner, or operator, of the vessel makes application to the Newfoundland fisheries board for a licence to import salt, in which will be stated the quantity to be stored and the purpose for which it is to be used.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   ARRANGEMENT WITH NEWFOUNDLAND TO PERMIT CANADIAN FISHERMEN TO LAND PORTION OP CATCH AND SALT
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TIE-UP OF HALIBUT FISHING FLEETS ON PACIFIC COAST


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

Mr. Speaker, as conflicting reports are reaching Ottawa regarding the settlement of the difficulty which tied up the Pacific halibut fleet, may I ask the Minister of Fisheries if he has any official information to give the house respecting the settlement of this matter?

Topic:   TIE-UP OF HALIBUT FISHING FLEETS ON PACIFIC COAST
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LIB

Ernest Bertrand (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST BERTRAND (Minister of Fisheries):

A telegram was sent to my deputy minister by the president of the fishemen's union, dated May 17, and reading as follows:

Vancouver and Seattle halibut fleets voted to begin fishing to-night. Minor details with regard to delivery yet to be worked out by Seattle. Vancouver fishermen anticipate leaving for grounds May 20.

Topic:   TIE-UP OF HALIBUT FISHING FLEETS ON PACIFIC COAST
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FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL

BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES

LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance):

I should like to make a statement in connection with the restrictions on pleasure travel under the foreign exchange control regulations.

The traditional freedom of movement between Canada and the United States has contributed very greatly to the neighbourly feeling and understanding between the two countries, and any interference with this freedom could not be lightly undertaken. It was, therefore, with the greatest reluctance that the government accepted the necessity of imposing the travel restrictions in July, 1940, as a means of conserving Canada's United States dollar resources for essential purposes. It is not possible to make an exact estimate of the amount of United States exchange which has been made available for essential war purchases as a result of the restrictions. The amount has, however, been very substantial and there is no doubt that the restrictions played a vital part in seeing us through a period of critical scarcity of United States funds. Those who have had to forego customary visits to the United States may have the satisfaction of knowing that they thereby played no small part in ensuring that exchange considerations have at no time limited our war effort. I should like to pay a tribute here to the good grace with which the travel restrictions have been accepted by the Canadian people and to the intelligent understanding of their necessity shown by all sections of the American public.

Hon. members will recall that on several occasions since the travel restrictions were imposed, both the Prime Minister and I have stated that they would be relaxed as soon as conditions made such a step feasible. It is not yet possible to remove the restrictions entirely, but I am glad to be able to announce that the government now feels that the foreign exchange position is such as to justify some relaxation. Notwithstanding the difficulties with respect to. transportation, the government attaches such importance to the resumption of normal friendly contacts betwen Canadians and Americans that it has now decided that moderate amounts of United States funds should be made available to residents of Canada for travel for any purpose. It should be clearly understood that the government can give no undertaking that transportation will necessarily be available for all who may wish to take advantage of the exchange relaxation.

Residents desiring to travel to the United States will still be required to obtain foreign exchange control board permits. Such permits will in future be granted, however, in the following circumstances:

United Nations Administration

(a) Banks will be given authority to sell up to $75 U.S. and approve a travel permit for travel to the United States for any purpose where the applicant has not obtained a travel permit (except for business or in transit travel) within the preceding six months. In order to meet the case of persons who may wish to make only one trip to the United States during the course of a year, the board will approve applications for up to $150 U.S. for a single trip during a twelve-month period.

(b) Short Form H, which is the common permit used in border communities and which has hitherto authorized the export of $5 Canadian, on condition that the funds may not be spent in the United States except for urban transportation, will be revised to authorize the export of $10, of which not more than $5 may be United States cash acquired as change on previous trips to the United States and the funds exported may be used for any expenditures in the United States connected with the visit there.

The board will, of course, continue to make United States funds available in appropriate amounts where such funds are necessary for travel for business, health or educational reasons.

These relaxations in the foreign exchange control travel restrictions will go into effect as soon as the necessary instructions can be issued by the foreign exchange control board to banks and customs officers. I expect that this will be within the next few days.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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NAT

Percy Chapman Black

National Government

Mr. BLACK (Cumberland) :

Is consideration being given to allowing people from the United States, who wish to come to Nova Scotia for their summer holiday, a greater amount of gasoline? Under the present regulations they are not given enough to permit them to bring their cars to Nova Scotia and return home, with the result that they are not able to make summer visits to that province.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

The matter of the control of

gasoline comes under the jurisdiction of my colleague the Minister of Munitions and Supply.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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NAT

Gordon Knapman Fraser

National Government

Mr. FRASER (Peterborough West):

Would the United States portion of the train fare have to come out of the $75 which you are allowing people who wish to go to the United States?

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

I think, and I am fairly sure I am correct in this, that transportation by

train can be purchased in Canadian funds, so that that would not take any part of the $75 or $150 as the case may be.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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NAT

Gordon Knapman Fraser

National Government

Mr. FRASER (Peterborough West):

In the past if a bank issued $50 in United States currency, or if a person had a cheque for $50 in United States funds, the United States portion of the transportation, amounting to perhaps $24 or $30, would have to come out of those United States funds.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

I do not know what the practice was in the past, but I made inquiry as to the very point on which the hon. gentleman based his question, and was informed that transportation costs could be met in Canadian funds, which would be over and above the $75 or $150 as the case may be.

Mr. MeCANN: Are there to be any changes in the premium or discount rates?

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

That is a matter of government policy to be announced in due course. None is being announced to-day.

Topic:   FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROL
Subtopic:   BELAXATION OF RESTRICTIONS ON TRAVEL TO THE UNITED STATES
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May 18, 1944