May 12, 1944

SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

No, not particularly. I

should like to ask for a ruling on another matter that affects the public accounts committee. The hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar (Mr. Coldwell) rose on a question of privilege with regard to a number of accounts that were before the public accounts committee. I should like to ask if an hon. member may rise on a question of privilege on a matter that is before the public accounts committee but may not rise on a question of privilege on a matter that is before the radio broadcasting committee?

Topic:   MB. HANSELL-PROCEEDINGS OF RADIO RROADCASTING COMMITTEE
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Whatever may have

happened the facts as set out by the hon. member are these. A statement was made by him in a committee of which he is a member. An article has been published reflecting upon the hon. member. I have ruled that the house cannot deal with a matter that should first come before that committee. If the hon. member will look at Beauchesne's Parliamentary Rules and Forms, second edition, paragraph 665, he will see that that paragraph reads as follows:

Until the report and evidence have been laid upon the table, it is irregular to refer to them in debate, or to put questions in reference to the proceedings of the committee.

At the moment the house has no knowledge of what has happened in the committee, and therefore the hon. member is not in order in rising on a question of privilege on a matter that should be brought before the committee.

Topic:   MB. HANSELL-PROCEEDINGS OF RADIO RROADCASTING COMMITTEE
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

Was it made clear to Your Honour that the hon. member for Macleod referred to a press statement?

Topic:   MB. HANSELL-PROCEEDINGS OF RADIO RROADCASTING COMMITTEE
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LIB
SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. BLACKMORE:

Was it made clear

that the hon. member was referring to a press statement?

Topic:   MB. HANSELL-PROCEEDINGS OF RADIO RROADCASTING COMMITTEE
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. I have ruled.

Post-War Civil Aviation

Topic:   MB. HANSELL-PROCEEDINGS OF RADIO RROADCASTING COMMITTEE
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MR. HOWE-LETTER FROM LORD BEAVERBROOK READ IN THE HOUSE ON MAY 11

LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege on another subject. Yesterday, as reported in Hansard, page 2807, the leader of the opposition asked this question:

I should like the minister to state whether what he read is the letter in full.

I answered "It is." The answer should have been, "It is, with the exception of one sentence." This came to my attention when I was revising my remarks. I read the statement, and in reading it I omitted a sentence which had no relation to the subject matter we were discussing and which I thought, in a hurried reading, might prejudice further, negotiations if it were made public. Your Honour will recall that I was reading a private letteT at the insistence of the leader of the opposition. After the debate I handed the letter in full to the Hansard reporter. It quite escaped my mind that in reading it I had left out that sentence. The sentence was typed into the Hansard record, and, apparently by the Hansard reporter, was checked with my verbal statement and the sentence was deleted. When the record came to me, I checked back, again read the subject matter of the sentence. It seemed to me that the deletion should stand, on the ground that it was not in the public interest to place before parliament that particular sentence.

Topic:   MR. HOWE-LETTER FROM LORD BEAVERBROOK READ IN THE HOUSE ON MAY 11
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POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADIAN DRAFT CONVENTION


On the order for motions:


LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Mr. Speaker, I now have the full text of Lord Beaverbrook's statement in the House of Lords, made on Wednesday, and as it differs slightly from the agreed statement which I read to the house yesterday, perhaps I should place this version on Hansard. It is sent from the High Commissioner for Canada in London to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, and is as follows:

The United States proposed that we should go forward to an international conference on certain lines and I will quote those lines. They were that there should be an international authority to lay down standards for technical requirements and for rates of air carriage and to interchange information. According to the American plan the proposed authority would start on a non-executive basis with no power or means of enforcing its regulations, at least during an interim period. I hope I have made quite clear the position taken up by the United States of America. It proposed an international authority on a non-executive basis with no

2S50

Post-War Civil Aviation

power or means of enforcing its regulations at least during the interim period. The United Kingdom delegation presented for consideration what is known as the Canadian draft convention, which has been laid on the table of the Canadian parliament. This draft convention lays down a detailed plan for international regulatory authority with powers of enforcement. Its provisions include the allocation of frequencies of air service and national quotas for international air traffic. I hope I have made clear the distinction between the two proposals. The Canadian proposal was considered by the Americans to be too rigid as a basis for talks at the proposed international conference. After discussion it was agreed, therefore, that we should go forward to the conference on the basis of proposals for international handling of civil aviation agreed at the commonwealth conversations some six months ago. These proposals are in some respects open to varying interpretations and were considered by the Americans to be flexible enough to provide a more satisfactory basis for an international conference. The broad purpose would be to draw' up an international convention on air navigation to be implemented by an international transport organization which would evolve standards, seek to eliminate uneconomic competition, work out for each nation an equitable participation in world air transport and maintain broad equilibrium between air transport capacity and traffic on offer. On these general principles the United States and Great Britain are in agreement. The powers of enforcement of the provisions will be open to further discussion. There you have the progress towards international "cooperation in civil aviation. I repeat the principles, the elimination of uneconomic competition, the setting up of national quotas in international air transport, equilibrium between the transport capacity and the traffic offering on any international air route. These must be the foundations of an enlightened approach to this subject in the future. But make no mistake; we did not give up the Canadian draft convention without reluctance. We would have preferred it. Mr. Howe, the Canadian minister, has produced an admirable document building up his structure for the regulating authority on the principles agreed at the commonwealth conversations.

It is signed by the high commissioner.

Mr. POULIOT; Nevertheless, I was in agreement for once with Beaverbrook on that.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADIAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

May I ask a question of the minister arising out of the statement he has made to-day? In the statement of His Lordship there is a reference to the commonwealth proposal which apparently was different, in extent and in purport, from the Canadian convention. In view of the fact that His Lordship referred to that proposal, I would ask the minister whether or not, under that proposal, Great Britain and the other dominions were in favour of an all-empire route.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADIAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

I have already stated that I am not in a position to discuss the conversations that took place in London. I have already stated that no agreement was finalized

and that the purpose of the conversations was not to finalize an agreement but to clarify the viewpoint of those attending the conference.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADIAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

May I ask the minister one question on that point? I was not very clear, in connection with the statement by Lord Beaverbrook, as to what the difference was between the Canadian convention and what is referred to here in the words, "instead, we adopted the commonwealth report". What is the difference between the Canadian convention and the commonwealth report?

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADIAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The commonwealth report was a draft prepared by a subcommittee during the conversations, for consideration by the assembly. It was a very brief document. As I stated previously, the Canadian convention was founded on that report, but expanded to form what we considered to be a rounded document on the subject.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADIAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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MAILING OF PRODUCERS' CHEQUES FOR 1940-41 PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATES

LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. MacKINNON (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to announce that the Canadian wheat board is commencing the mailing out of cheques to producers in payment of their 1940-41 participation certificates to-day.

As soon as the mailing of the cheques can be completed on the 1940-41 participation payments, the cheques will be mailed in turn to cover the 1941-42 and 1942-43 payments.

The per bushel payments by grades on the 1940-41 certificates have been fixed at 6-215 cents for No. 1 northern and range all the way from 6-166 cents for No. 2 northern to 20-599 cents for feed wheat and to 26-640 cents for No. 1 mixed grain. The initial advance on this last grade was only 35 cents, basis in store Fort William, Port Arthur.

In general, the rates of payment are higher on the lower grades, owing to the fact that the board was able to realize more on the ultimate sales over the initial advances made on those grades than was realized over the initial advances on the higher grades.

I have in my possession a statement showing the per bushel payments for each of the 1940-41 grades. As this statement is rather lengthy,

I do not wish to place it on Hansard, but I have a number of copies available for any of the hon. members interested, and copies are being sent to the press gallery.

Topic:   MAILING OF PRODUCERS' CHEQUES FOR 1940-41 PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATES
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NAT

James Arthur Ross

National Government

Mr. ROSS (Souris):

Are these cheques

being mailed to all three prairie provinces?

Topic:   MAILING OF PRODUCERS' CHEQUES FOR 1940-41 PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATES
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?

Leslie Gordon Bell

Mr. COLDWELL:

Or just Saskatchewan?

Alaska Highway

Topic:   MAILING OF PRODUCERS' CHEQUES FOR 1940-41 PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATES
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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MacKINNON (Edmonton West):

The cheques are going out in regular order.

Topic:   MAILING OF PRODUCERS' CHEQUES FOR 1940-41 PARTICIPATION CERTIFICATES
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May 12, 1944