May 11, 1944

LIB

Mr. WINKLER:

Liberal

1. By years, what was the price range of raw rubber per pound in Canada since 1919 until the outbreak of the present war?

2. By years, what was the estimated cost of Buna S. (artificial rubber) in Canada since the outbreak of the present war, using as a base, (a) ethyl alcohol; (b) petroleum?

3. At the present price of raw materials, what is the estimated cost of producing ethyl alcohol from, (a) grain; (b) molasses; (c) waste sulphite liquor; (d) wood hydrolysis; (e) petroleum?

4. What is the estimated cost of producing alcohol to-day, using wheat at a price of its low for the last 25-year period as compared with producing it from molasses priced at its low for the same period?

Topic:   PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL-RAW AND SYNTHETIC RUBBER
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SWITLIK CANADIAN PARACHUTES LIMITED-ROMEO VALOIS

IND

Mr. LACOMBE:

Independent Liberal

1. Has Switlik Canadian Parachutes Limited, 3575 St. Lawrence street, Montreal, obtained any contracts from the dominion government, testing silk for the manufacture of parachutes?

2. If so, for what amount, in what year, and at what date?

3. Is one Romeo Valois a director of Switlik Canadian Parachutes Limited, or interested therein ?

4. Have sub-contracts been granted by Switlik Canadian Parachutes Limited to any individuals or companies?

5. If so, to what individuals or companies, and for what amounts in 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944?

Topic:   SWITLIK CANADIAN PARACHUTES LIMITED-ROMEO VALOIS
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CONTRACTS TO J. A. A. LECLAIR AND DUPUIS LIMITED, MONTREAL

IND

Mr. LACOMBE:

Independent Liberal

1. Have J. A. A. Leclair and Dupuis Limited, of Montreal, obtained contracts from the dominion government, either from the Department of Munitions and Supply or any- other department?

2. If so, for what amounts during 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943 and 1944?

3. What kind of work have they performed for the government?

4. What is the total amount of payments made to them up to the present in connection with said contracts for each of the years above-mentioned?

Post-War Civil Aviation

Topic:   CONTRACTS TO J. A. A. LECLAIR AND DUPUIS LIMITED, MONTREAL
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FARM CREDIT

LIMITED GUARANTEE OF BANK LOANS FOR IMPROVEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF FARMS


Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of Finance) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient to introduce a bill to encourage the provision of intermediate term and short term credit to farmers for the improvement and development of farms through bank loans, guaranteed with limitations, by the crown; moneys payable under the act including expenses of administration to toe paid out of the consolidated revenue fund. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. DIEFENBAKER (Lake Centre):

I should like to direct certain questions to the Minister of Munitions and Supply in connection with a Canadian Press dispatch of to-day's date in reference to a statement made by Lord Beaverbrook in the House of Lords yesterday with respect to post-war aviation. Lord Beaverbrook stated that the. united nations would hold a conference, possibly this year, to decide on the post-war international regulation of civil aviation, and also that Great Britain had rejected or abandoned the Canadian-sponsored plan covering this field. The questions I should like to ask the minister are these. Will he inform the house as to whether or not Canada will be represented at a united nations conference, as mentioned by Lord Beaverbrook; also whether he had any knowledge that the draft Canadian convention that was submitted to this parliament was unacceptable to both Great Britain and the United States, and whether the Canadian government intends to submit any convention or plan on civil aviation alternative to the convention already submitted to this parliament.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Hon. C. D. HOWE (Minister of Munitions and Supply):

Since the statement of Lord Beaverbrook in the House of Lords has been referred to it may be well to place the exact statement on Hansard. I happen to have it here in a letter from His Lordship dated April 26, 1944, as follows:

The LTnited States delegation proposed that we should go forward to an international conference on the following lines. That there

should be an international authority to lay down standards for technical requirements and for rates of air carriage and to interchange information. The proposed authority would start on a non-executive basis with no power or means of enforcement of its regulations-at least, during an interim period.

The United Kingdom delegation presented for consideration the Canadian draft convention which has been laid on the table in the Canadian parliament. This draft convention lays down a detailed plan for an international regulatory authority with powers of enforcement. Its provisions include the allocation of frequencies of air services and national quotas for international air traffic.

This Canadian proposal was considered by the Americans to be too rigid as a basis for talks at the proposed international conference. After discussion it was agreed, therefore, that we should go forward to the conference on the basis of proposals for international handling of civil aviation evolved at the commonwealth conversations. These proposals are in some respects open to varying interpretations and were considered by the Americans to be flexible enough to provide a more satisfactory basis for an international conference. The broad purpose would be to draw up an international convention on air navigation to be implemented by an international transport organization which would evolve standards, seek to eliminate uneconomic competition, work out for each nation an equitable participation in world air transport and maintain broad equilibrium between air transport capacity and traffic offering. On these general principles the United States and Great Britain are in agreement. The powers of enforcement of the provisions would be open to further discussion.

In his preamble my hon. 'friend referred to the Canadian proposals, as laid on the table of this house, as being rejected. May I point out that the Canadian proposals were not presented to the United Kingdom-American conference for acceptance or rejection. They were prepared in Canada as a basis for the discussion of international problems. It is rather interesting to note from the statement I have just read that the draft convention as tabled here was presented to the bilateral meeting in London as the view of the United Kingdom government. It then would appear that the United States took the view that its provisions were too rigid, and for that reason another draft upon which the Canadian convention was founded is to be put forward for discussion when the international conference is held.

The first question was whether Canada would be represented at a united nations conference. Canada certainly will be present. I was then asked if I had any knowledge that the Canadian convention submitted to this parliament was unacceptable, both to Great Britain and to the United States. Lord Beaverbrook's statement makes it perfectly clear that the United Kingdom were quite prepared to accept the basis proposed by Canada. The United States simply stated

Post-War Civil Aviation

that in many particulars the convention was too rigid. I think I may say that the position of the United States was known when the statement was laid on the table. It was simply tabled here as Canada's proposed basis for a discussion of an international agreement.

The third question was whether Canada intended to submit an alternative convention or plan. May I say that the Canadian convention is the first attempt by any nation to put forward a detailed plan for the regulation of post-war civil aviation. The amazing thing to me is that the Canadian proposal has received such widespread study. It has been the subject of comment in aviation circles in a good many countries. In my opinion it served a most useful purpose and has become the focal point in the discussion of civil aviation problems. I stated in the house during the course of the debate that no one would be more surprised than I if the convention should be accepted without many changes as a basis for international agreement. It has proved a most useful basis for discussions of post-war civil aviation, and for that reason I think it is a useful document. Canada will not at this time attempt to prepare another document.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. COLDWELL:

Since this convention has not been approved by two of the major powers, will Canada continue to place such a convention before the international conference, at which many other nations will be represented? In other words, will Canada continue to press for a solution of the problem along the lines suggested?

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

The views tabled in this parliament are the views of Canada for a solution of the civil aviation problem. Our view's may be modified as a result of discussion, but we will continue to press them in any conference to which we are invited. I believe it is proposed that a number of bilateral conferences will be held before the general conference, and at those discussions Canada will present the document tabled here as the views of Canada.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

Will the minister, following the usual procedure in a matter of this kind, table the letter from Lord Beaverbrook to himself from which he has quoted?

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

It is not a secret letter, but it is a personal letter. That letter contains the agreed statement that Lord Beaverbrook said was to be made after the discussions in London. I am not going to table this letter; it is personal.

IMr. Howe.]

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Then you should not have read it.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

I did not read the letter.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

You read part of it.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

I read the official statement given in the House of Lords which happened to be conveyed with the personal letter from Lord Beaverbrook to myself. I read the official message, and I am not going to table a private letter.

Topic:   POST-WAR CIVIL AVIATION REFERENCE TO STATEMENT BY LORD BEAVERBROOK IN RESPECT TO CANADLAN DRAFT CONVENTION
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May 11, 1944