April 21, 1944

H. R. H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH GREETINGS FROM PARLIAMENT OF CANADA ON THE OCCASION OF HER EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Hon. members will recall, Mr. Speaker, that to-day is the eighteenth birthday anniversary of Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth. Last night I sent a message to Her Royal Highness on behalf of the government and the people of Canada, but I am sure that Her Royal Highness would be pleased to receive greetings from the par-

H. R. H. Princess Elizabeth

liament of Canada to-day. I would therefore say, if I may; Mr. Speaker, on behalf of hon. members, that this House of Commons sends its warmest and best wishes to Her Royal Highness, and among them the wish that she may have very many very happy returns of the day.

Topic:   H. R. H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH GREETINGS FROM PARLIAMENT OF CANADA ON THE OCCASION OF HER EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Following the Prime Minister's remarks in recognition of this very happy occasion, I should like to take the opportunity of associating the official opposition with the message which he has suggested may properly go from the House of Commons at this time. May I add, to what he has said, that Her Royal Highness celebrates, on this her eighteenth birthday, the occasion on which she becomes officially a councillor of state on the grim and momentous threshold of climacteric events so far as the war is concerned. The royal family has, I think, attained a position in the esteem of the nation and empire more elevated than perhaps it has ever held before, since that family has been sharing in a very intimate way in the trials and tribulations, the sorrows and sadness of the people. One is prompted at this time to make some mention of this, and I should like therefore to associate the official opposition with the remarks of the Prime Minister and to couple therewith our felicitations and expressions of respect, devotion and affection to Her Royal Highness in the very happy event now being celebrated.

Topic:   H. R. H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH GREETINGS FROM PARLIAMENT OF CANADA ON THE OCCASION OF HER EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

May I just say briefly that we too would join in the felicitations to Her Royal Highness Princess Elizabeth. We regard the royal family as a symbol of unity among the nations which comprise this great commonwealth, and as such we honour and respect them.

Topic:   H. R. H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH GREETINGS FROM PARLIAMENT OF CANADA ON THE OCCASION OF HER EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

The members of my group are pleased to join with the Prime Minister and others who have spoken in tendering to Her Royal Highness and the royal family very best wishes for a long and happy time following these dreadful years.

Topic:   H. R. H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH GREETINGS FROM PARLIAMENT OF CANADA ON THE OCCASION OF HER EIGHTEENTH BIRTHDAY
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PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT

PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21

LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. G. A. CRUICKSHANK (Fraser Valley):

I rise to a question of privilege. Under date of April 20 I have received a notice, signed by the Clerk of the House, which I think is unfair to the Clerk himself, in connection with the parliamentary restaurant. As I read the declaration, it actually bars one of the most

responsible officers of the House of Commons, the Clerk himself, from eating in the parliamentary restaurant. Perhaps it is a misprint; I do not know. It is not rationing, but certainly, according to the letter I have received under the date indicated, the Clerk of the House of Commons is barred from admission to the restaurant which he supervises, Mr. Speaker, under your jurisdiction, it also bars Brendan Bracken and Elmer Davis. I do not see why I should not have the privilege of taking these gentlemen to the parliamentary restaurant, or why any member of the press should not be allowed to do so. I do not know of any better way of cementing the friendly relationship between the united nations than that I should have the privilege of taking Elmer Davis and Brendan Bracken to the restaurant.

On the orders of the day:

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I am not quite

certain whether my inquiry should be directed to Your Honour or to the Prime Minister. It concerns a matter which has been made the subject matter of a question of privilege at to-day's sitting. On March 21 last the joint committee on the parliamentary restaurant adopted certain regulations affecting members of the Senate and the House of Commons, deputy ministers, private secretaries, and members of the press gallery, as well as others mentioned in the regulations. I have no desire to reflect upon the wisdom or otherwise of the regulations so passed; that would be highly improper. I should like however to inquire if it is the custom in respect of a joint committee of both houses of parliament for a report to be presented and concurrence asked, the procedure which is followed in respect of the reports of single chamber committees. I raise this point merely to seek information, in view of the fact that the rights and privileges of some of the persons mentioned appear to have been drastically affected by the new regulations, without any opportunity having been given to parliament to express its opinion.

May I add that in my time in parliament I cannot recall a parliamentary joint committee having made a report to the house. I cannot recall on the other hand that there has been any regulation which has so drastically affected certain persons who perhaps have not the same opportunity to express their opinions in the house.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The restaurant committee is not a committee of the house, but is a joint

Parliamentary Restaurant

committee of the Senate and the House of Commons. At several meetings they have had under consideration the conduct of the restaurant, and came to the conclusion that there were many abuses which had to be rectified, more particularly in these days of war. The committee has met, and will again meet. May I say that these are the considered opinions of the committee, and are not those promulgated by the Clerk of the House, who is in fact only acting as the clerk of the committee. These other matters have to be taken into consideration. I rather think the committee may feel that they should make some report to the house respecting their deliberations, and their reasons for coming to this conclusion. That is a matter I shall bring before it, when the proper time comes.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

May I say that I hope

nothing in my remarks would indicate that I was placing any responsibility upon the Clerk. I did not mention that. I realized that it was a resolution of the joint parliamentary committee, as was indicated. However, I do hope that Your Honour will review the situation and perhaps find it possible to have the matter dealt with again by the committee in case there are certain injustices which should be remedied.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I used the words, "promulgated by the Clerk" because they appeared in one of the Ottawa newspapers. If it is suggested that responsibility for what was done rests upon the shoulders of the Clerk, that is entirely wrong. As I have indicated, the matter is before the committee and it will be the subject of further conversation and discussion. I think I can say that the committee may consider that a report be made later to the house.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. A. W. NEILL (Comox-Alberni):

I wonder if I might be allowed to speak a sentence, or at any rate not more than two, in connection with the remarks made by the hon. member for Fraser Valley (Mr. Cruick-shank) and later by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon) on the new rules governing the cafeteria and1 the restaurant. Of course, I must endorse the remark made by the leader of the opposition that the Clerk is in no way responsible. He merely sent out the notice. The committee is responsible. The leader of the opposition is the leader of a party and perhaps he spoke with due care and consideration having regard to the fact that he is a leader. I am not the leader of any party; I am responsible only to my constituents, and I am prepared to take a chance with them.

100-140J

After twenty-eight years of experience in public life I consider the rules suggested here the most colossal piece of snobbery I have ever seen in .print. If the house allows them to go without being changed I shall be ashamed to be connected with a body that has produced this kind of class legislation, which I thought had gone out of fashion fifty years ago. The day before I was first nominated in 1898 to run as a member I was working in a gravel pit shovelling gravel, and none of my constituents thought any the worse of me, nor was I ashamed. Yet apparently we as members of parliament are to be treated as being superior to the people who sent us here.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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LIB

Thomas Vien (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The remarks that have been, made by the hon. member are entirely contrary to what- is intended by the committee. I cannot allow such a statement to go to the country, that a pedestal is being set up for members of the Senate or of the House of Commons. The restaurant is subject to rules which the committee are endeavouring to apply as properly as may be for the convenience of members, senators and others, and such remarks as the hon. gentleman has made are entirely contrary to the whole spirit of the committee. *

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

I challenge the Speaker to put the notice into Hansard so that the public will get it and can judge.

Topic:   PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT
Subtopic:   PRIVILEGE-RESOLUTION ADOPTED AT MEETING OP JOINT COMMITTEE ON MARCH 21
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PRIVILEGE-MR. HANSELL REFERENCE TO REMARK OF MR. KNOWLES IN DEBATE ON APRIL 20

SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. E. G. HANSELL (Macleod):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege respecting what I believe to be a reflection upon the entire Social Credit group in this house.' After I spoke last evening the Minister of Munitions and Supply (Mr. Howe) replied as appears at page 2207 of Hansard. He said:

Just a word in reply to my hon. friend. I have listened with great interest to the foreign policy of the Social Credit party. I think this is the first time it has been expounded in this house.

Then the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) made this remark: "International anarchy". I heard the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre make that remark. He did not say it very loudly. I did not want to make a public example of him by asking him to withdraw it then, as I thought the Hansard reporter did not get it. Evidently he did, since it is recorded here. I ask my hon. friend to withdraw that remark. If he is a gentleman he will do it.

Privilege-Mr. Hansell

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. HANSELL REFERENCE TO REMARK OF MR. KNOWLES IN DEBATE ON APRIL 20
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mt. KNOWLES:

Mr. Speaker, may I say that in making that remark I was simply expressing my view as to what was involved ' in the kind of policy which the hon. members were expounding. It stands.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. HANSELL REFERENCE TO REMARK OF MR. KNOWLES IN DEBATE ON APRIL 20
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

The hon. member is still not a gentleman.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. HANSELL REFERENCE TO REMARK OF MR. KNOWLES IN DEBATE ON APRIL 20
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. KNOWLES:

I rise to a question of privilege-

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. HANSELL REFERENCE TO REMARK OF MR. KNOWLES IN DEBATE ON APRIL 20
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April 21, 1944