April 17, 1944

THE LATE HUGH B. McKINNON

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members will have learned with deep regret of the passing, during the Easter recess, of the hon. member for Kenora-Rainy River, Mr. Hugh McKinnon.

Before resuming our sessional duties, I should like to express the sense of loss we experience to-day as we realize he is no longer with us.

Mr. McKinnon was a member of this house for nearly ten years, having been first returned to parliament in a by-election in September, 1934. He was reelected at the general elections in 1935, and again in 1940.

Mr. McKinnon was bom in Kenora, and at the time of his death had all but completed his fifty-ninth year. His interest in. public life first manifested itself in municipal affairs and, later, in provincial affairs. He was, for a time, member of the town council of Kenora, and at the age of forty-one was a candidate for the Ontario legislature. Though unsuccessful in the contest, he lost none of the personal popularity he enjoyed among those who knew him best, and when first nominated as a candidate for the federal parliament he carried the constituency by a majority of over six thousand.

Mr. McKinnon will be remembered by his fellow-Canadians for his deep interest in and practical knowledge of the problems of labour, and of railway labour in particular. He himself had become a locomotive engineer when he was scarcely twenty-one years of age, and his knowledge of our country's political as well as industrial problems was gained in the school of practical experience. He was a devoted member of the Brotherhood of Loco-

The late Hugh B. McKinnon

motive Engineers. There could be no higher testimony to his ability and , fidelity than the regard in which he was held by the entire membership of this enlightened and powerful organization. Recognition of this confidence found expression as early as 1928 in his appointment as one of the technical advisers to the Canadian delegation to the conference of the International Labour Office of the League of Nations, which was held at Geneva that year.

As we in this parliament recall our association with the late Mr. McKinnon, we think of him as one of the kindliest and most modest of men, faithful in his attendance at house sittings, constant in his interest in its proceedings, and deeply solicitous in his own quiet and unassuming way, of the well-being of his fellowmen wherever opportunities to serve their interests arose.

In my last conversation with him in one of the lobbies of this house, he spoke with great earnestness of some of the problems he saw looming on the horizon and of the manner in which he believed they could be most effectively met. I need hardly add that our conversation had to do with the closest possible cooperation of all classes in the prosecution of the war, and in the solution of post-war problems.

Our country and our parliament owe a great debt to men of the type of the late Mr. McKinnon, who look to what is best in human nature, and whose constant effort it is to remove distrust, and to establish confidence wherever that is possible in the affairs of industry and of the state.

I personally feel very deeply the loss of so loyal a supporter and so true a friend as Mr. McKinnon was to me at all times. This sense of loss I know is shared to the full by my colleagues and by all hon. members who sit on this side of the house. I know I can say, wholly irrespective of party political affiliations, that Mr. McKinnon's passing will be felt by all hon. members as a distinct loss to the membership of this house.

Mr. McKinnon is survived by his wife and seven children, four daughter and three sons, two of 'whom, still young in years, are serving in the armed forces, both have been overseas.

I would ask you, Mr. Speaker, to convey to Mrs. McKinnon and to all the members of her family, the expression of the great respect in which her late husband's memory is held by all members of this house, and of the deep sympathy felt by hon. members for her and for all the members of her family in their bereavement.

Topic:   THE LATE HUGH B. McKINNON
Permalink
NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, the friendship of the various men with whom one comes in contact is one of the treasured prizes of public life. Hugh McKinnon was a member of the house whose friendship I was honoured to have. I liked his approachability, his open manner, and regardless of any political divisions in this parliament I am sure he was beloved by all hon. members. He was one of the workers of Canada who had been raised to high positions of honour by those who knew him best. He was in every respect what is known as a self-made man, and for this we in the House of Commons honour him.

As the Prime Minister has pointed out, Hugh McKinnon was a great exponent of the principles and ideals of the Labour movement. He wTas a member of that movement, and the very last time I heard him speak in this chamber was in connection with that beloved topic of his. His words always carried exceptional weight in this house, despite the fact that the opportunity of debate Was not always his, because every member believed that when he spoke he expressed his true convictions.

Mr. McKinnon represented one of the great developing constituencies in Canada, and his friendship particularly for those who worked with him through the years in the railway brotherhood was something which I think all of us would wish to have brought to the attention of the house, as the Prime Minister has done to-day. His only two sons of military age are in the armed forces, and two Sons-in-law have been overseas in this war, so that what the late Hugh McKinnon himself contributed by way of public service to his country is being continued, and the torch carried by his family to-day.

I want to extend to the Prime Minister and to the government on behalf of His Majesty's Loyal Opposition our sympathy in their great loss of a respected and beloved colleague. To Mrs. McKinnon and the family goes out our deep and genuine sympathy, and I should like to be associated with the Prime Minister, Mr. Speaker, in the message of sympathy which you have been asked to convey to the bereaved wife and family.

Topic:   THE LATE HUGH B. McKINNON
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. COLDWELL (Rosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, we wish to join in this expression of sympathy for Mrs. McKinnon and the family, and also to associate ourselves with those who have expressed sympathy with the Prime Minister in the loss of a faithful friend and follower. From time to time when we

Mutual Aid-French Agreement

reassemble after an adjournment we are shocked to find that one or more of our membership have passed to the great beyond. Indeed, in the midst of life we are in death, and I think that is brought home to us in this house more directly than in most other spheres of peaceful activity.

Mr. McKinnon, as the Prime Minister has said, was a good member of this house, and a good representative of the calling which he followed. I have heard engineers of the town of Kenora say, when I have been visiting there, that Mr. McKinnon was one of the best engineers who served the great railway system which he joined many years ago. I had the privilege of meeting him on the committees of this house more frequently than perhaps in any other parliamentary activity, and I always appreciated his kindly manner and the sense of responsibility which he displayed under all circumstances. We of this party wish to join in the expression of sympathy which you will convey, Mr. Speaker, to his widow and family.

Topic:   THE LATE HUGH B. McKINNON
Permalink
SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. BLACKMORE (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, the words of the Prime Minister and of the two other hon. members who have preceded have pictured a very fine man. I knew Mr. McKinnon personally and have a similar opinion of him, and I desire to join with the Prime Minister and those who have already spoken in words of appreciation of this good man's good life and in words of sympathy to those who are bereaved.

Topic:   THE LATE HUGH B. McKINNON
Permalink
PC

Joseph Henry Harris

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. H. HARRIS (Danforth):

Mr. Speaker, may I be permitted to add a word of tribute to the late Hugh McKinnon? It was my privilege four or five years ago to have him at my home in the city of Toronto for a week, at which time he was very much interested in the transportation problem that we had in that centre, and I must say that we enjoyed having him with us. He was a Christian gentleman of the highest order. He had intensely studied the subject in which he was interested, and it was a great pleasure to be associated with him. While he was in Toronto he gave his earnest attention to some of the industrial problems of that great centre, for he had a conception of what the industrial life of the centre of the central province means to his own community.

I have felt keenly the passing of the late Hugh McKinnon, and I desire that it go on record that we thought highly of him, and that we extend to his good wife and the members of his family our sincere condolences. I trust that you, Mr. Speaker, will find a way of embodying these sentiments in the records of the House of Commons.

Topic:   THE LATE HUGH B. McKINNON
Permalink

MUTUAL AID

TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to table copies of the mutual aid agreement which was signed on Friday last with the French Committee of National Liberation.

Hon. members will recall that on March 16 I gave a lengthy statement on the mutual aid agreements with the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and Australia. Since that time a similar agreement has been signed with China. The present agreement with the French committee is thus the fifth to be concluded. All agreements are substantially the same in form and are identical in purpose and principle. The present agreement differs from the agreement with the United Kingdom only in a few minor particulars-chiefly matters of terminology- arising out of the fact that the committee has not the formal status of a government.

The agreement which I am tabling sets forth the general terms and conditions under which war supplies are being transferred under the Mutual Aid Act. The fact that no agreement has been signed until now does not, of course, mean that no supplies have yet been sent under the principles of mutual aid. The agreement merely sets out in formal terms the conditions under which such aid has already been sent and under which it will continue to be sent in future. As I pointed out on March 16, there will be an opportunity of discussing the terms of the various agreements when the mutual aid legislation is before the house, and at the moment I wish only to acquaint the house with the fact that this further agreement has been signed, and to make public the terms.

It gave me particular pleasure to sign this agreement, just as it now does to lay it before the house. We have, in the provision of mutual aid, a tangible and most practical demonstration of the cooperation between Canada and the French committee in the prosecution of the war. The committee is carrying forward the great traditions of France in its unrelenting fight against our common enemy, and it will be, I am sure, a source of satisfaction to all the people of Canada that we are able to help in this direct and practical way.

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink
NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

May I

ask the Prime Minister to make a statement of some kind with respect to what, if any, extraterritorial rights Canada had in China?

[Mr. Coldwell.l

Canada-China Agreements

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My hon. friend has anticipated the next subject on which I wish to speak.

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury: I beg pardon. Great minds run in the same channels.

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink
LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Regarding the agreement which has just been tabled between Canada and the French Committee of National Liberation, Major-General Vanier is the ambassador of Canada in Algiers, and I see that the agreement is signed for and on behalf of the French Committee of National Liberation by "G. Bonneau." I wonder what is the title of Mr. Bonneau, and how it is that the committee has no ambassador here, as we have one there. I wonder also if the ambassador over there represents the King of Canada as well as the territory of Canada, and what would Mr. Bonneau represent, and why it is not an ambassador who signs? Why does not the French Committee of National Liberation treat Canada as well as Canada treats it?

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

General Vanier has the status of an ambassador, but he is not sent as an ambassador to the French committee. The committee, as I have mentioned, is not in the same position as a recognized government, and Mr. Bonneau in Canada is the representative of the committee. Canada will welcome the opportunity of receiving in accordance with customary diplomatic practice, an ambassador from France just as soon as France again has a duly constituted government.

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink
LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Has Mr. Bonneau the status of an ambassador also?

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

No, he has not the status of an ambassador. He has the status of a representative in Canada of the French national committee.

Topic:   MUTUAL AID
Subtopic:   TABLING OF AGREEMENT WITH THE FRENCH COMMITTEE OF NATIONAL LIBERATION
Permalink

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS

CANADA-CHINA-RELINQUISHMENT OP EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to table three copies of the treaty between Canada and the Republic of China concerning the relinquishment of extraterritorial rights and the regulation of related matters, with exchange of notes, signed at Ottawa on April 14, 1944.

With respect to the treaty which I have just tabled, it is similar in its terms to the British extraterritorial treaty concluded on be-100-130

half of the United Kingdom, Northern Ireland and India on January 11, 1943, and to the United States treaty with China, concluded on the same day.

On the coming into force of the treaty, all international agreements which authorize British or Canadian authorities to exercise jurisdiction in China over Canadian nationals are abrogated. The government of Canada agrees to cooperate w'ith the government of the Republic of China, to the extent that any Canadian interest may be involved, in arrangements for the abandonment by foreign govenments of special privileges hitherto held by them in Peiping, Shanghai, Amoy, Tientsin and Canton.

The relinquishment of extraterritorial rights does not affect existing rights of Canadian nationals with regard to real property in China. It is agreed that Canadian property in China will be subject to Chinese laws concerning taxation and national defence. Real property held by Canadian nationals in China may not be alienated to the government or nationals of a third country without the consent of the government of China. The Chinese government agrees to apply this restriction on alienation in an equitable manner, and undertakes to take over the property in question and pay adequate compensation therefor, if the right to transfer is refused.

Canadian nationals in China are to be accorded the right to travel, reside and carry on trade in China. Each country is to endeavour to accord to nationals of the other, treatment not less favourable than that enjoyed by its own nationals in regard to legal proceedings, the administration of justice and the levying of taxes.

Consular officers of each country may re side in such places as are agreed on. They are to have the right to interview and to communicate with nationals of their country, are to be informed whenever any such nationals are under arrest, and may visit such nationals and receive communications from them.

The treaty provides that, not later than six months after the cessation of hostilities, the two governments will enter into a comprehensive modern treaty of friendship, commerce, navigation and consular rights; meanwhile, questions affecting the rights of Canadian nationals in China and questions affecting the sovereignty of the republic of China, which are not covered by this or previous treaties, will be decided in accordance with generally accepted principles of international law.

Chinese Immigration

This treaty forges yet another bond with our great ally China, which has so long resisted our common enemy. It is evidence, not only of the solidarity of the united nations in the present struggle, but of their determination to preserve the good relations which have been built up during the war and to continue them into a lasting peace.

With regard to the question which the hon. member for York-Sunbury (Mr. Hanson) asked a few moments ago, I would say that the treaty will 'be brought before parliament for the purposes of approval, and will subsequently be ratified. At the time that the treaty is before the house for approval I shall seek to give my hon. friend the answer to the question he has asked.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS
Subtopic:   CANADA-CHINA-RELINQUISHMENT OP EXTRATERRITORIAL RIGHTS
Permalink

CHINESE IMMIGRATION

DRAFT TREATY FOR RECIPROCAL ADMISSION OF NATIONALS FOR TEMPORARY RESIDENCE

April 17, 1944