March 14, 1944

PREMIER DREW


On the order for motions:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KIXG (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to refer to a statement which Premier Drew is reported to have made in the Ontario legislature yesterday, and which has been given general circulation in the press of Canada by the Canadian Press. The dispatch is dated Toronto, March 13, C.P., and reads in part as follows:

After studying the text of Prime Minister King's anouncement, however, Premier Drew issued the following statement:

"Mr. King does some truly remarkable juggling with figures in his attempt to distort the effect of the notices put up by the liquor control board of Ontario.

"All the beer available for sale in Ontario under the restrictions imposed by the dominion government has been sold. The notices simply conveyed the information that the alcoholic beverages available at the sales outlet were restricted by the dominion order. That statement was correct.

"Mr. King has not furthered the cause of dominion-provincial cooperation by misrepresenting the facts to the whole of Canada regarding the action of the Ontario government.

Elsewhere the report states that Premier Drew had said:

Press reports quoted Mr. King as saying the wartime order called for a 10 per cent beer cut and Ontario had made it 25 per cent.

In order that there may be no misrepresentation of the facts or misunderstanding concerning them, may I read what I did say yesterday on this subject, as reported in Hansard, page 1392, with reference to the posting of the alcoholic beverages notices:

In Ontario, on the authority of the liquor control board, notices have been posted in establishments where alcoholic beverages are sold, which read as follows:

"Notice: The quantity of alcoholic beverages saleable at this sales outlet is restricted by reason of order in council No. 11374 passed by the federal government Dee. 16, 1942,-This notice is posted on authority of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario."

There is no indication in these notices that the action of the federal government was a war measure, enacted to increase the country's total war effort. No account is taken or mention made of the fact that the production and consumption of alcoholic beverages in 1942 had reached the highest level in Canada's history. Instead, the poster is designed to have it appear that, in the opinion of the government of Ontario, the action of the federal government is arbitrary, unfair and unnecessary.

Mil M

Alq&hoUc Beverages.

the.; enactment of the dominion wartime alcoholic beverages order, there has during the yea* been released for sale in each province of Canada, ninety per cent of the beer which was released fprfesale in the twelve months ended ^October iS-l. *942. Over the whole country, this JWVttHPt JBs some sixty per cent in excess of w it Which had been released for sale in the rear rfrifer to the outbreak of war. To-day the Leverage rooms of Ontario, where the notices of lha Ontario Liquor Control Board are posted, ere not being allocated 90 per cent by the board, instead, they are being allotted only 75 per cent. It is true that the quantity saleable in the province has been restricted by the dominion order in council, but it was not restricted by 25 per cent. That restriction on the beverage rooms was imposed by the liquor control board of Ontario.

The board's action has the approval of the government of Ontario. It was defended by the Attorney General of Ontario in the Ontario legislature on the 8th of this month. The posting of the notices certainly misrepresents the action of the federal government. It is clearly an attempt to have the federal government held responsible for the whole twenty-five per cent reduction.

That is the entire statement I made in regard to the notices, and it will be seen that I expressly said that it is true that the quantity saleable in the provinces has been restricted by the dominion order in council. That is what Mr. Drew says is true. But what has been omitted altogether from the notices which were posted is any reference to the fact that this is part of a war measure, that the restriction was only 90 per cent, whereas 75 per cent was all that was being given out in the beverage rooms.

Mr. Drew goes on to say, in the report which I have just read:

It is typical of Mr. King that he failed to inform the people of Canada at the same time that I had written to him last Friday asking for an appointment so that the attorney-general, the commissioner of the Liquor Control Board and I could meet him in Ottawa in an effort to find some solution to the unsatisfactory situation which had developed.

I presume I am to accept to-day's announcement as his idea of an appropriate reply designed to encourage cooperation. In dealing with the matter in the legislature, Premier Drew read the letter he had sent to the Prime Minister asking for an early conference on the beer situation.

I have a copy of the letter, and as it has been tabled in the Ontario legislature, I would ask permission to table it here. The previous correspondence was tabled some days ago. What I wish to call to the attention of hon. members is this statement of Mr. Drew:

It is typical of Mr. King that he failed to inform the people of Canada at the same time that I had written to him last Friday-

Et cetera, et cetera. And then:

I presume I am to accept to-day's announcement as his idea of an appropriate reply designed to encourage cooperation.

What are the facts with regard to the receipt of Mr. Drew's letter and the statement I made yesterday? To begin with, it was on Saturday, March 4, that the press of this city and of other parts of the country reported that a notice had been posted in all liquor and beer sale outlets in Ontario. That was on Saturday, March 4, and on Wednesday, March 8, the morning papers reported a statement the provincial treasurer of Alberta, the Hon. Solon Low, made in the legislature; the statement to which I referred yesterday. On the afternoon of that day, having seen the notices, and having observed what Mr. Low was saying in Alberta, I communicated with my colleague, the Minister of National Revenue (Mr. Gibson), and indicated to him that I thought immediate action would have to be taken to prevent further misrepresentation of the position as between the dominion and the provinces and that in my opinion, it would be necessary, to leave the control of restriction on beer wholly within the purview of the provinces so as to give them complete control -in other words, to have single rather than dual control, particularly as the provinces have complete jurisdiction with regard to distribution and sale.

It was on Wednesday, March 8, that I so communicated with my colleague the Minister of National Revenue. On Thursday, March 9, the morning papers reported a statement of the attorney general of Ontario defending the notices posted by authority of the liquor board.

I had hoped it might be possible for me to take up the matter on Friday the 9th, and to make a statement in the house immediately, along the lines of the one which I made yesterday, but I was too pressed with other matters to be able to get a statement prepared in that time. I therefore gave the statement yesterday, having taken part of Saturday to prepare it at some length in order that it might set out all the essential facts. As a matter of fact, therefore, the decision with respect to the action to be taken in regard to restrictions was made two days before Mr. Drew's letter was written. Mr. Drew's letter was written on March 10.

May I say a further word with regard to the time at which I received Mr. Drew's letter.

I did not receive the letter until last night at half past eight o'clock. I think the house will understand very clearly how that came to be

Alcoholic Beverages

when I give to them the particulars which appear from the envelope, and also from what they know of the proceedings in the house yesterday. The letter is dated March 10, 1944. It bears the postmark, "Toronto, March 10, 11.30 p.m., 1944, Ontario"-11.30 p.m. on March 10, which was Friday. It could not possibly have reached Ottawa until late on Saturday at the earliest. The probability is it came on the following day but the Ottawa date stamp is not on to so indicate. The letter would not be sent to my office until Monday morning. But on the envelope it is also marked " personal." My secretaries follow the custom of putting by themselves letters marked "personal," so that when I have had a chance to get through with public communications I may personally look at the letters so marked.

I had no chance yesterday even to look at communications that came in dealing with public business generally until late in the afternoon. I had important matters to take up in the cabinet and I had the statements that were given yesterday, one regarding the wages control order as well as the other on beer restrictions which I had to look over and further revise. I also received from the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon) a communication intimating that he wished to ask a question respecting the communication from Mr. de Valera. The result was that I did not get an opportunity even to have any luncheon before I came into the house. I made the statement I did without any knowledge whatever that there was a communication from Mr. Drew. At about half past four or five I went to my private office here and had a cup of tea and a sandwich-not a glass of beer and a sandwich, but a cup of tea and a sandwich. I was kept in the office until after seven at night. When I got back to my residence I found some personal letters. I took advantage of the opportunity to have a bit of a meal first, and afterwards I opened and read the letters marked " personal." The first letter I noticed on the top was one from the Premier of Ontario, which I have in my hand and which is marked "personal."

With all due respect, I say that this particular statement:

It is typical of Mr. King that he failed to inform the people of Canada at the same time that I had written to him last Friday. . . .

-is hardly the kind of comment that one would expect in the circumstances.

Topic:   PREMIER DREW
Permalink
NAT
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Then further:

I presume I am to accept to-day's announcement as his idea of an appropriate reply designed to encourage cooperation.

All I wish to say as to that is that I do not deal with public business in that particular way.

Topic:   PREMIER DREW
Permalink
NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

Having heard the explanation of the matter covered by the Prime Minister, I should like to say this. The Premier of Ontario could hardly be held accountable for the office arrangements of the Prime Minister of Canada, and it seems to me, while we must respect the explanation which has been given by the Prime Minister with respect to his not having received the letter, nevertheless I think the house and the country will be in agreement that the statement made last night by the Premier of Ontario, having in mind the fact that he had on Friday sent a letter to the Prime Minister, was in every respect a proper and an appropriate statement to make. I hope that the Prime Minister will not attempt, because there is a Progressive Conservative government in Ontario, to pick unnecessary fights with the Premier of Ontario.

Topic:   PREMIER DREW
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

May I say to my hon. friend, I hope he will not attempt to make a lot of petty party politics out of this particular matter. .

Topic:   PREMIER DREW
Permalink
NAT
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am seeking to conduct this discussion on the plane on which it should be carried on. When my hon. friend says to me that the Premier of Ontario is not responsible for the arrangements of my office, may I tell him that the Premier of. Ontario, if he has a letter which is a public communication that is being sent to the Prime Minister to be read immediately, should not mark that letter "personal". More than that, if he attached importance to the letter, he could easily have sent me a telegram informing me of its dispatch or sent, the letter by air mail or special delivery. I hope the day will never come when, so far as office arrangements are concerned, I am to be expected to have all my personal mail opened by secretaries to be dealt with before I have any opportunity of dealing with official business. So far as the statement made by the Premier of Ontario is concerned, all I can say is if the circumstances had been reversed and I had been communicating with Mr. Drew and had felt the matter important enough to refer to publicly, before imputing

Awards for Gallantry

motives, I should have taken care to inquire, first of all, whether my letter had been received, and if not, what the reasons 'were.

Topic:   PREMIER DREW
Permalink

NAVAL SERVICES

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY


Hon. ANGUS L. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence for Naval Services): As I promised last week, I now table a list giving the names and addresses of 452 members of the Royal Canadian Naval Service who have received awards for gallantry or mentions in dispatches since the beginning of this war, together with a further list giving the numbers of non-operational awards.


CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. KNOWLES:

May I inquire whether

the list of names which the Minister of National Defence for Naval Services has tabled will be included in to-day's Hansard as was done in the case of the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force?

Topic:   NAVAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY
Permalink
LIB

Angus Lewis Macdonald (Minister of National Defence for Naval Services)

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD (Kingston City):

I

prepared the list in response to a request from the leader of the opposition (Mr. Graydon). I think I stated last week in my introduction to the naval estimates that I intended to put the table on Hansard. With the consent of the house it will go on Hansard. I assumed that the consent would be granted.

The list of names and awards follows:

Topic:   NAVAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY
Permalink

OPERATIONAL AWARDS


O.B.E 20 M.B.E 10 B.E.M 32 D.S.0 7 D.S.C 49 D.S.M 29 Conspicuous Gallantry Medal 1 George Medal 6 Polish Cross of Valour 4 Norwegian War Medal 2 Greek War Cross, 3rd Class 1Czechoslovak Military Cross, 1939.... 3Commendations 7 Legion of Merit in degree of Legionnaire (U.S. Award) 1 Mentions in Despatches 280


O.B.E.-20


Alleyne. Victor P. Commander. R.C.N. (Temp) 2 June, 1943 322 Armit Road, Esquimalt, B.C. Arnison. Alfred Borden Lieut. Commander (E), R.C.N.R. 1 January. 1943 3884 W i3th. St. Vancouver, B.C. Baugh. Gerald 0. Lieut. Cdr. R.C.N.R. 3 June. 1943 3990 Marguerite Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. [Mr, Mackenzie King.l Bulmer, John Lieut. Cdr. (E), R.C.N.R. (Temp) 1 January, 1944 10 Westoe Avenue, South Shields Durham, England Clark, Norman Vincent Lieut. Commander, R.C.N.R. 14 Ogilvie Street, Halifax, N.S. 1 January, 1943 Copelin. Charles Temp. Lieut. Cdr. R.C.N.R. Liverpool, N.S. 1 January, 1943 Crutchlow, Everett Francis Surg. Lieut. R.C.N.V.R. (Temp) 660 Landsdowne Avenue, Westmount, Que. 1 January, 1943 Despres. Louis Gerard Fabiante Lieut. (E), R.C.N.R. 192 P.O. Box, Montmagny, Quebec 1 January, 1943 Griffiths, George Humphrey Commander, R.C.N. (Temp) Upwood Farm, Berwick, King's Co. Nova Scotia 2 June, 1943 Herman, Ronald James Lieut. R.C.N.V.R. (Temp) 8 Garden Crest Apts. Summer Street Halifax, Nova Scotia 2 June, 1943 Johnson. Bernard Dodds Leitch Lieut. Cdr. R.C.N.R. 1386 Nicola Street, Vancouver, B.C. 1 January, 1944 Kenney. Reginald R. Lieut. R.C.N.V.R. (Temp) 378 West Young St. Halifax, N.S. 2 June, 1943 Lay, Horatio Nelson A/Captain, R.C.N. WTalkerton, Ontario 1 January, 1943 MacNeil], Robert A. S. . Lieut. Cdr. R.C.N.R. (Temp) 19 Inglewood Place, Ottawa, Out. 2 June, 1943 Maheu. Joseph Mobrv Lieut. Cdr. (E) R.C.N.R. 98 McManamy St. Sherbrooke, Quebec 1 January, 1943 Mainguy, Edmond Rollo Captain, R.C.N. Heanitree Farm, Herb Road, Duncar, V.I., B.C. 1 January, 1943 Miles. George Ralph A/Captain, R.C.N. now Commander 33 Seeley St. Saint John, N.B. Pullen, Hugh Francis Commander. R.C.N. Oakville, Ontario 1 January, 1944 Stephen, George Hay, D.S.C. Lieut. Cdr. R.C.N.R. . 2284 Hampton Ave., Montreal. Quebec 18 May, 1943 Awards for Gallantry Woods, William Lieut. Cdr. R.C.N.R. (Temp) 431 Manning Avenue, Verdun, Quebec 1 January, 1944 M.B.E.-10 Armstrong, D. B. 11 Northcliffe Blvd., Toronto, Ontario 1 January, 1944 Blair, David William A/Lieutenant, R.C.N.V.R. 141 Moncton Avenue, Quebec, Quebec Cormier, Joseph Louis Nazaire Chief Skipper, R.C.N.R. 79 Des Prairies St., Quebec City 16 October, 1939 Garrard, William Arthur Bordett Lieut. R.C.N.V.R. 1847 Crescent Road, Victoria, B.C. Gillespie, James Blaine Coxswain, R.C.N.R. (F.R.) 3919 West 13th. Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. 1 January, 1943 LaCouvee, Reginald James Commissioned Engineer, R.C.N.R. (now Lieut. (E) Delaire, Gaspe County, Quebec 1 January, 1943 Milsom. Patrick Sproull Lieut. R.C.N.V.R. 124 Spadina. Toronto 1 June, 1943 Savory. John A. Lieut. (E). R.C.N.V.R. 10 Lumsden Avenue, Hamilton, Ontario 18 May, 1943 Thomas. Herbert Warrant Mechanician, R.C.N. 255 Percy St. Ottawa, Ontario 1 January, 1943 Watson. Douclas Rannie Lieut. R.C.N.R. (Tempi 4451 Western Avenue. Westmount, Que. 10 August. 1943


B.E.M.-32


Batchild*r. William Milford Engine Room Artificer, 3/C, R.C.N.R. 22 Alley Street. Charlottetown, P.E.I. 1 January, 1944 Bell. David George E.R.A. 3/C, R.C.N.R. 430 Quebec Avenue, Toronto, Out. 18 May. 1943 Binnie. E. E. Ab'e Seaman. R.C.N. tt McDougall Court. 100th. Street Edmonton. Alberta 2 June. 1913 Boutilier. Clyde ER A. 3/C. R.C.N.V.R. 94 Wellington St. Halifax. N.S. 1 January, 1943 Brown. John Petty Officer. R.C.N. 18 AVilson St. Woodstock, Ont. 1 January, 1943 Campbell, John Driver Telegraphist, R.C.N. 1272 27 Ave. E., Vancouver, B.C. 2 June, 1943 Chapman, C. M. A/leading seaman, R.C.N.R. Murray Harbour, P.E.I. 2 June, 1943 D'Aubin, Donald Rupert E.R.A. 4/Class, R.C.N.V.R. 81 Victoria Road, Sydney, N.S. 1 January. 1944 Eagle, Frederick William Chief E.R.A. R.C.N. 1032 McGregor Avenue, Victoria, B.C. 1 January, 1943 Fisher, Douglas C. Stoker P.O. R.C.N.V.R. 506 Avenue H. South, Saskatoon, Sask. 2 June, 1943 Fitzgerald, Michael John Signalman, R.C.N.V.II. 512 Dupont Street, Toronto, Ontario 1 January, 1944 Hagen, Edwin Richard Robert E.R.A. 3/Class, R.C.N.R. Brant Hill, Port Dover, Ontario 1 January, 1944 Harding, Walter L. Bond Street, Yarmouth South, Yarmouth County Nova Scotia 2 June, 1943 Helgason, Stefan Chief P.O. R.C.N.R. 206 Almon St. Halifax, N.S. 1 Jan uar y, 1944 Hetherington. William Francis P.O. Electrician. R.C.N.V.R. 174A Laurier Avenue, Asbestos, Quebec 1 January, 1943 Humphries. William George Chief E.R.A. (Now A/Warrant Engineer) Old Lock. 1 East Front St. Port Dalhousie, Ontario 1 January, 1943 Lancien. John Gordon Ordinary Seaman. R.C.N.V.R. 27 Levis Avenue, Quebec, Quebec 10 October, 1943 LeFaive, Urbain Joseph E.R.A. 3/Class, R.C.N.R. Port McNieoll, Ontario 1 January, 1943 Lemieux. Joseph Edward Stoker, P.O. R.C.N. 4554 Sussex St. Ottawa, Ontario IS October, 1940 Mitton. Donald Grant Supply Chief P.O. R.C.N. Nictaux Falls, Nova Scotia 1 January. 1943 Paterson, James A/Chief E.R.A. R.C.N.R. 241 Wright Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 2 June, 1943 Awards jor Gallantry


March 14, 1944